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REGIMENTAL LOSSES 



IN 



THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 



1861-1865 



A TREATISE ON THE EXTENT AND NATURE OF THE MORTUARY LOSSES IN THE 

UNION REGIMENTS, WITH FULL AND EXHAUSTIVE STATISTICS COMPILED 

FROM THE OFFICIAL RECORDS ON FILE IN THE STATE 

MILITARY BUREAUS AND AT WASHINGTON. 



BY WILLIAM F. FOX, LT. COL., U. S. V. 

PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY OF THE TWELFTH ARMY CORPS; LATE PRESIDENT OF THE IO7TH N. Y. VKTEKAN 
VOLUNTEERS ASSOCIATION; AND MEMBER OF THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 







ALBANY, N. Y. 

ALBANY PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1889 



COPYRIGHT BY 

WILLIAM F. FOX 

1889 



I 



.* . 




BRANDOW PRINTING COMPANY 
ALBANY, N. Y. 



PREFACE. 



some it may appear that the publication of a work like this belongs properly within the 
province of the General Government, and that a citizen in private life should not 
presume to offer information on official matters. In reply it should be stated that this work 
is offered only as a convenient digest of official publications already issued by the General 
Government, or State Military Bureaus, to which have been added some original exhibits 
deduced from official statistics heretofore published and unpublished. 

The Adjutant-General s office at Washington has been engaged for several years on the 
publication of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. The work is 
admirably done, but it is of surprising magnitude, and cannot be completed for many years. 
It already fills so many large volumes that it is too bulky and costly for the ordinary student. 
Then, again, there are peculiar and interesting deductions which do not come within the scope 
of the Government work, but which find a proper place within these pages. 

The present volume has been undertaken with the belief that a convenient and accurate 
summary of the official statistics would be an acceptable addition to the history of the war. 
Some details of minor importance have been omitted, as the work is designed for the benefit 
of advanced students, and it is assumed that the reader is already familiar with the more 
important points in the history of the events alluded to. 

There has been a dearth of official information regarding a certain class of regimental 
statistics which are essential to the history of the war, and are of interest, not only to the 
surviving participants, but to all who are interested in the story. Regimental affaire are of 
more importance to the average soldier than Corps or Army matters ; and, so, an effort has 
been made to supply within these pages certain facts regarding regimental losses which are 
outside the province of the Government publications. 

It is with pleasure that acknowledgment is made of courtesies extended by the 
Adjutant-Generals of the various State Military Bureaus, and the Adjutant-General s office 
at Washington. Without their kindly assistance the work could not have been completed. 

No statistics are given here that are not warranted by the official records. The work 
represents the patient and conscientious labor of years. Days, and often weeks, have been 
spent on the figures of each regiment. It is hoped that before disputing any essential fact, 
a like careful examination of the records will be made. Having done that, if any fail to 
reconcile facts and statements, they will confer a favor by addressing a communication on 
the matter, so that an opportunity may be afforded to explain the seeming discrepancy, or, 
if an error, to correct it in a subsequent edition. 

ALBANY, N. Y. , May 1, 1888. THE AUTHOR. 



219121 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

PAB. 

THE CASUALTIES OF WAR MAXIMUM OP KILLED IN UNION REGIMENTS -- MAXIMUM 
OF PERCENTAGES 1 

CHAPTER II. 

MAXIMUM OF REGIMENTAL Loss IN KILLED, IN ANY ONE BATTLE PROPORTION OF 
WOUNDED TO KILLED 16 

CHAPTER III. 

PERCENTAGE OF KILLED IN REGIMENTS, IN PARTICULAR BATTLES COMPARISON OF 
SUCH LOSSES WITH THOSE OF EUROPEAN REGIMENTS 20 

CHAPTER IV. 
Loss IN OFFICERS LIST OF GENERALS KILLED SURGEONS AND CHAPLAINS KILLED .. 38 

CHAPTER V. 

AGGREGATE CASUALTIES COMPARED WITH THOSE OF FOREIGN WARS Loss IN EACH 
ARM OF THE SERVICE -- DEATHS FROM DISEASE CLASSIFICATION OF DEATHS BY 
CAUSES 46 

CHAPTER VI. 

THE COLORED TROOPS HISTORY OF THEIR ORGANIZATION THEIR LOSSES IN BATTLE 

AND BY DISEASE 52 

CHAPTER VII. 
MUSTER-OUT ROLLS ANTHROPOLOGICAL STATISTICS 

CHAPTER VIII. 

THE CORPS ORGANIZATIONS IN THE UNION ARMIES A HISTORY OF EACH. 64 



vi CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER IX. 

PAGE. 

FAMOUS DIVISIONS AND BRIGADES - ---- H4 

CHAPTER X. 

THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS STATISTICS AND HISTORICAL SKETCH OF 

EACH.-.. 122 

CHAPTER XI. 

COMPLETE LIST OF BATTLES, WITH REGIMENTS SUSTAINING GREATEST Loss IN EACH, 

AND THEIR CASUALTIES - - - 424 

CHAPTER XII. 

COMPLETE LIST OF REGIMENTS AND BATTERIES IN THE UNION ARMY, WITH MORTUARY 
Loss IN EACH- -THE NUMBER KILLED AND THE DEATHS FROM DISEASE, OR OTHER 
CAUSES 465 

CHAPTER XIII. 

AGGREGATE OF DEATHS IN THE UNION ARMIES, BY STATES TOTAL ENLISTMENT, BY 
STATES PERCENTAGES OF MILITARY POPULATION FURNISHED, AND PERCENTAGES OF 
Loss STRENGTH OF THE ARMY AT VARIOUS DATES CASUALTIES IN THE NAVY. .. 525 

CHAPTER XIV. 



THE GREATEST BATTLES OF THE WAR LIST OF VICTORIES AND DEFEATS CHRONOLOG 
ICAL LIST OF BATTLES WITH Loss IN EACH, UNION AND CONFEDERATE 540 

CHAPTER XV. 

CONFEDERATE LOSSES STRENGTH OF THE CONFEDERATE ARMIES CASUALTIES IN 
CONFEDERATE REGIMENTS LIST OF CONFEDERATE .GENERALS KILLED LOSSES IN 
THE CONFEDERATE NAVY IN CONCLUSION 552 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES 



IN 



THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR, 

1861-5. 



CHAPTER I. 



THE CASUALTIES OF WAR --MAXIMUM OF KILLED IN UNION REGIMENTS - 

MAXIMUM OF PERCENTAGES. 

V\7"A.RS and battles are considered great in proportion to the loss of life resulting from 
them. Bloodless battles excite no interest. A campaign of manoeuvres is accorded 
but a small place in history. There have been battles as decisive as Waterloo and Gettysburg ; 
but they cost few lives and never became historic. Great as were the results, Waterloo and 
Gettysburg would receive but little mention were it not for the terrible cost at which the 
results were obtained. 

Still, it is difficult to comprehend fully what is implied by the figures which represent 
the loss of life in a great battle or a war. As the numbers become great, they convey no 
different idea, whether they be doubled or trebled. It is only when the losses are considered 
in detail by regiments, for instance that they can be definitely understood. The regiment 
is the unit of organization. It is to the army what a family is to the city. It has a well 
known limit of size, and its losses are intelligible ; just as a loss in a family am l>e understood, 
while the greater figures of the city s mortuary statistics leave no impression on the mind. 

The history of a battle or a war should always l>e studied in connection with the figures 
which show the losses. By overlooking them an indefinite, and often erroneous, idea is 
obtained. By neglecting them, many historians fail to develop the important points of the 
contest. They use the same rhetorical description for different attacks, whether the pressure 
was strong or weak ; the loss, great or small ; the fight, bloody or harmless. 

To properly understand the relative importance of the various movements on a battle 
lit -Id, the student must know the loss of life at the different points of the line. He will then 
see where the points of contact really were ; where the pressure was greatest ; where the 
scenes of valor and heroism occurred. There is no better way of doing this than by noting 
the place in the line held by the various regiments and ascertaining the loss of life in each. 

There were over two thousand regiments in the Union Armies. On some of these the 
brunt of battle frll much heavier than on others. \Vhile some were exempted from the 



2 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

dangers of active service, others were continually at the front. While some were seldom 
called upon to face the enemy s fire, others were repeatedly ordered into the thickest of the 
fight. While in some regiments the number of killed was small, in others the Roll of Honor 
was unequaled in the records of modern wars. Who were these men who fought so well in 
defense of their flag ? What were the names and numbers of their regiments ? What were 
the losses in these regiments ? What limit is there to the toll of blood exacted from a 
regimental thousand during a long and bloody war ? 

The one regiment, in. all the Union Armies, which sustained the greatest loss in battle, 
during the American Civil War, was the Fifth New Hampshire Infantry.* It lost 295 men, 
killed or mortally wounded in action, during its four years of service, from 1861 to 1865. It 
served in the First Division, Second Corps. This division was commanded, successively, by 
Generals Richardson, Hancock, Caldwell, Barlow, and Miles ; and any regiment that followed 
the fortunes of these men was sure to find plenty of bloody work cut out for it. The losses 
of the Fifth New Hampshire occurred entirely in aggressive, hard, stand-up fighting ; none of 
it happened in routs or through blunders. Its loss includes eighteen officers killed, a number 
far in excess of the usual proportion, and indicates that the men were bravely led. Its 
percentage of killed is also very large, especially as based on the original enrollment. The 
exact percentage of the total enrollment cannot be definitely ascertained, as the rolls were 
loaded down in 1864 with the names of a large number of conscripts and bounty men who 
never joined the regiment. 

The second highest in the list of infantry regiments having the greatest number killed in 
battle, is the Eighty-third Pennsylvania, which lost 282 officers and men who died while 
fighting for the Union. This was a Fifth Corps regiment, serving in MorelPs afterwards 
Griffin s First Division. Two of its Colonels were killed, and a third was badly wounded 
and crippled for life. It was a splendid regiment, well officered and well drilled. It suffered 
a severe loss in killed, by percentage, as well as in numbers. 

The next regiment on the list is the Seventh Wisconsin Infantry, of the famous Iron 
Brigade, Wadsworth s (First) Division, First Corps. This gallant regiment stands high in 
the list, Because of its many battles and the persistency with which it would hold its ground 
in the face of the deadliest musketry. By glancing at the table of percentages, it will be 
seen that the Seventh occupies an honorable place in that list also. 

Next, among the regiments sustaining the greatest loss in action, stands the Fifth 
Michigan, of the Third Corps, in which 263 were killed ; and next, comes the Twentieth 
Massachusetts, of the Second Corps, with a credit of 260 killed in battle. 

The following table will show clearly the relative position of the leading infantry 
regiments in point of numerical loss. It embraces every infantry regiment in the Union 
Annies which lost over 200 men, killed or mortally wounded in action, during the war. In 
all, there are forty -five : 



h,. 2ritay%&^&* th " ORVy ArtU1Cry WWch - Win " t0 their larffer form of organization, will be considered separately from 



M \\IMIM LosSKS IN KlU,KI>. 



KILLKD 



DIED OF Woi NDS. 



Regiment, 

5th New H;nnpshiro 
83d Pennsylvania 

Ttli Wisconsin 

5th Mi-bigan 
20th Massachusetts 
69th New York 
28th Massiichusetts 
16th Michigan 
105th Pennsylvania 

6th Wisconsin 
15th Massachusetts 
15th New Jersey 

2cl Wisconsin 
40th New York 
Gist Pennsylvania 
llth Pennsylvania 
48th New York 
45th Pennsylvania 
121st New York 
27th Michigan 

2d Michigan 
100th Pennsylvania 

8th Michigan 

2d Vermont 
lllth New York 
18th U. S. Infantry 

9th Illinois 
22d Massachusetts 

5th Vermont 
148th Pennsylvania 

9th Massachusetts 
81st Pennsylvania 

7th Michigan 
55th Pennsylvania 
17th Maine 

3d Vermont 
145th Pennsylvania 
14th Connecticut 
36th Illinois 

6th Vermont 
4 .th Ohio 
51st New York 
_ ; <>th Indiana 
57th Massachusetts 
53d Pennsylvania 



Division- 

Barlow s 

Griffin s 

Wads worth s 

Birney s 

Gibbon s 

Barlow s 

Barlow s 

Griffin s 

Birney s 

Wads worth s 

Gibbon s 

Wright s 

Wadsworth s 

Birney s 

Getty s 

Robinson s 

Terry s 

Potter s 

Wright s 

Willcox s 

Willcox s 

Stevenson s 

Willcox s 

Getty s 

Hays s(Alex.) 

Johnson s 

Dodge s 

Griffin s 

Getty s 

Bai -low s 

Griffin s 

Barlow s 

Gibbon s 

Ames s 

Birney s 

Getty s 

Barlow s 

Gibbon s 

Shendan s 

Getty s 

Wood s (Thos. J.) 

Potter s 

Birney s 

Stevenson s 

Barlow s 



Ctrpt. 


Officers. 


Second 


18 


Fifth 


11 


First 


in 


Third 


16 


Second 


17 


Second 


13 


Second 


15 


Fifth 


12 


Third 


14 


First 


15 


Second 


14 


Sixth 


S 


First 


10 


Third 


9 


Sixth 


L9 


First 


12 


Tenth 


18 


Ninth 


13 


Sixth 


13 


Ninth 


10 


Ninth 


11 


Ninth 


16 


Ninth 


11 


Sixth 


6 


Second 


8 


Fourteenth 


9 


Sixteenth 


5 


Fifth 


9 


Sixth 


11 


Second 


12 


Fifth 


15 


Second 


18 


Second 


11 


Tenth 


7 


Third 


12 


Sixth 


5 


Second 


18 


Second 


17 


Fourth 


11 


Sixth 


12 


Fourth 


14 


Ninth 


9 


Third 


14 


Ninth 


10 


Second 


5 



MfM. 

277 

271 

271 

247 

243 

24G 

2.35 

235 

231 

229 

227 

232 

228 

229 

218 

224 

218 

214 

213 

215 

214 

208 

212 

215 

212 

209 

211 

207 

202 

198 

194 

190 

197 

201 

195 

201 

187 

188 

193 

191 

188 

193 

187 

191 

195 



295 

282 

281 

2(53 

260 

259 

25(> 

247 

245 

244 

241 

240 

238 

238 

237 

236 

236 

227 

226 

225 

225 

224 

223 

221 

220 

218 

216 

216 

213 

210 

209 

208 

208 

208 

207 

20(J 

205 

205 

204 

203 

202 

202 

201 

201 

i>i ii i 



4 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

It may be of interest to state here that on the records of the War Department some of 
these regiments are not credited with quite so many men killed ; and, that if a tabulation 
were to be made from the official figures at Washington, the relative positions of some of 
these regiments would have to be slightly changed. In the first five regiments the Seventh 
Wisconsin would head the list, and the Fifth New Hampshire would stand third instead of 
first ; while the Eighty-third Pennsylvania, the Fifth Michigan and the Twentieth Massa 
chusetts would still hold, respectively, the second, fourth and fifth places, as before. The 
records of the War Department show as follows : 

7th Wisconsin . 280 killed or died of wounds. 

83d Pennsylvania . 278 " " " 

5th New Hampshire 277 " " " " " 

5th Michigan .... 262 " " " " 

20th Massachusetts 257 " " " " " 

This difference arises from the fact that in each regiment there were men borne on the 
muster-out rolls as "missing in action," whose fate had not been determined at the close of 
the war, at which time these rolls were made out. But, since then, many of the States have 
made strenuous efforts to ascertain the fate of these men. New Hampshire, for instance, 
published a supplement to its printed muster-out rolls, m which it accounts definitely for most 
of its missing, the State Adjutant-General having obtained, from various sources, satisfactory 
evidence that these men were killed. But the War Department declines and very properly 
to account for missing men as killed until they receive official information to that effect. The 
official channels, through which such information must come, are the original records of 
the muster-out rolls ; the final statements, as they are technically termed ; and the affidavits 
vvhich may accompany a pension claim. 

Now, the State of New Hampshire, and other States as well, have ascertained definitely 
that many of their missing men were killed, and have revised their records accordingly;* but, 
if these missing men have no heirs to prosecute their claims at the Pension Office, the records 
at Washington will remain unchanged, and the men will still be recorded there, not among 
the killed, but as missing. The mortuary statistics in these pages are compiled largely from 
State records ; hence, the figures in many cases will exceed those of the War Office. The 
variation, however, is not important enough to warrant this digression were it not for the 
honest endeavor to arrive at exactness, and to forestall any possible misunderstanding or 
controversy. 

In treating here of the matter of losses in battle, or otherwise, each regiment will be 
considered by itself. Hence, it is important that the student before going further should 
understand thoroughly the size and formation of a regiment, in order to comprehend the 
extent and nature of the loss. Otherwise, the figures would have little or no meaning. 

The infantry regiments, which formed the bulk of the army, had a maximum of 
organization beyond which recruiting was not allowed. There was, also, a minimum of 
strength which must be obtained before a regiment could be accepted. An infantry command 
consisted of ten companies of foot, and the Field and Staff : the latter were mounted, and 
consisted of the Colonel and such officers as were not attached to the company formations. 
The maximum formation was as follows ; 



* Xew Hampshire- : Adjutant-General s Kuport, 1806 : Vol. I. 



Kt>UM \TIMN AND 



| \ K |.;|MKNT. 



Fit til di! ,S7/// . 

1 Colonel. 

i Lieutenant Colonel 

1 Major. 

1 Adjutant. 

1 Quartermaster. 

1 Surgeon (Rank of Major). 

L Asst. Sur-vons. 

1 Chaplain. 

1 Sergeant-Major. 

1 Quartermaster s Sergeant. 

1 Commissary-Sergeant. 

1 Hospital Steward. 

2 Principal Musicians. 



15 



Company Formation. 

1 Captain. 

1 First Lieutenant 

1 Second Lieutenant. 

1 First Sergeant. 
4 Sergeants. 

8 Corporals. 

2 Musicians. 
1 Wagoner. 

82 Privates. 



101 



Ten companies, 101 each 
Field and Staff 



1010 

15 

Total 102:1 



In the minimum organization the formation, and number of officers, was the same ; but 
the number of privates was placed at 64, making the total of the minimum, 845. The 
newly recruited regiments, accordingly, ranged in numbers from 845 to 1025. The most of 
them left their rendezvous with full ranks, especially those which were raised under the 
second call for troops, in 1862. As their numbers became reduced by disease and wounds, 
fresh recruits were added, so that the total enrollment of a regiment was often increased 
several hundred before its term of service expired. Nominally, an infantry regiment consisted 
of one thousand men, less the depletion incidental to its service, the actual nunnVr of 
effectives being far below the nominal one. 

In addition to the infantry, there were 32 regiments of heavy artillery in the volunteer 
service. It would be unnecessary to mention these were it not that the heaviest loss in 
battle, of any regimental organization, occurred in two of these regiments, each of which lost 
more men killed than the Fifth New Hampshire. But, owing to their larger organization and 
different formation, they must be considered secondly, and in a class by themselves. A 
regiment of heavy artillery contained 1800 men, divided into 12 companies of 150 ; attached 
to each company were five line officers a captain and four lieutenants. The regiment was 
divided into three battalions of four companies, with each battalion under the command 
of a Major. There was but one Colonel and one Lt. Colonel, as in infantry. These troops 
performed garrison duty, serving mostly within the fortifications around Washington, or in 
the coast defences where heavy ordnance was used. In the spring of 1864, most of the heavy 
artillery regiments within the defences of Washington were ordered to the front, where they 
served as infantry, and took an active part in the campaign. 

The heaviest loss in this arm of the service and, also, in any regiment of the army- 
occurred in the First Maine Heavy Artillery, of Birney s Division, Second Corps. During its 
term of service it lost 23 officers and 400 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded in battle. 
This regiment is remarkable, also, for its large percentage of loss ; for the large numl>er of 
officei-s killed ; and, for having sustained in a certain engagement the greatest loss of any 
regiment in any one battle. The First Maine H. A. did not take the field until May, 1864, 



6 KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

having served the two previous years in the fortifications of Washington. Its fighting and 
all its losses occurred within a period of ten months. 

The next greatest loss in the heavy artillery is found in the Eighth New York, of Gibbon s 
Division, Second Corps, in which regiment 19 officers and 342 enlisted men were killed or died 
of wounds during their three years term of service. Like the First Maine, it did not go to 
the front nor see any fighting until the last year of its service, all its losses occuring during 
the last ten months of the war. 

The following list embraces all the heavy artillery regiments in which the number of 
killed, or died of wounds, exceeded two hundred : 

KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 
HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

Regiment. Division. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. 

1st Maine Birney s Second 23 400 423 

8th New York Gibbon s Second 19 342 361 

7th New York Barlow s Second 14 277 291 

2d Connecticut Wright s Sixth 12 242 254 

1st Massachusetts Birney s Second 9 232 241 

2d Pennsylvania Ferrero s Ninth 5 228 233 

14th New York Ferrero s Ninth 6 220 226 

2d New York Barlow s Second 10 204 214 

9th New York Eicketts s Sixth 6 198 204 

The Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery carried, from first to last, over 5000 names on 
its rolls. In fact, it comprised two regiments one in the Ninth, and one in the Eighteenth 
Corps. In the spring of 1864, the regiment, 1800 strong, joined the Second Division of the 
Eighteenth Corps, at Cold Harbor. The surplus men had been previously formed into a 
provisional " regiment with the same designation, and assigned to the Ninth Corps. The 
most of the losses occurred in this provisional command. 

A cavalry regiment numbered 1200 men, nominally, and was divided into twelve 
companies of one hundred each. They did not suffer such severe losses in particular 
engagements as did the infantry, but their losses were divided among a great many more 
battles. The cavalry went into action very much oftener than infantry. Although mounted 
and armed with sabres, much of their fighting was done dismounted, and with carbines. The 
mounted regiments which lost the most men, killed or fatally wounded in action, were the 
following : 

Regiment. Division. Corps. Officers. Men. Tolal. 

1st Maine Gregg s Cavalry, A. P. 15 159 174 

1st Michigan Kilpatrick s Cavalry, A. P. 14 150 164 

5th Michigan Kilpatrick s Cavalry, A. P. 6 135 141 

6th Michigan Kilpatrick s Cavalry, A. P. 7 128 135 

1st Vermont Kilpatrick s Cavalry, A. P. 10 124 134 

1st N. Y. Dragoons Torbert s Cavalry, A. P. 4 126 130 

1st New Jersey Gregg s Cavalry, A. P. 12 116 128 

2d New York Wilson s Cavalry, A. P. 9 112 121 

llth Pennsylvania Kautz s Cavalry, A. P. 11 108 119 

The light artillery was composed of batteries with a maximum strength of 150 men and 
six guns. Before the war closed many of them were reorganized as four-gun batteries. In 



M \\IMIM in KIII.KD IN LHJHT 



some cases then- were regimental or-ani/at ions comprising 12 batteries, hut most of tin- 
troops in (his arm of tin- service were independent commands; even where there was a 
regimental organization, each halt cry acted separately and independently of the others. In 
i lie \olu i ii ei service the leading batteries, in point of loss in battle, were as follows : 

KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 



Sjmonym. 

"Cooper s" 

"Sands " 

"Phillips " 

"Weeden s" 

"Cowan s" 

"Stevens " 

"Ricketts" 

"Boston s" 

" Kern s" 

"Randolph s" 

"Pettit s" 

Bigelow s" 

"Bradbury s" 

"Wood s" 



tt 
tt 
tt 

tt 




LIGHT ARTILLKHY 

Rattfry. 

B" 1st Penn. Artillery 
llth Ohio Battery 
5th Mass. Battery 
C " 1st R. I. Artillery 
1st N. Y. Battery 
5th Maine Battery 
F" 1st Penn. Artillery 
A " 1st Penn. Artillery 
G" 1st Penn. Artillery 
E" 1st R. I. Artillery 
B " 1st N. Y. Artillery 
Dth Mass. Battery 
1st Maine Battery 
A" 1st 111. Artillery 



Corps. 

First 


Officers. 

2 


AffH. 

19 


Total. 

21 


Seventeenth 


., 


20 


20 


Fifth 


1 


IS 


11> 


Fifth 


< 


lit 


19 


Sixth 


2 


i<; 


is 


First 


2 


16 


18 


First 


1 


17 


18 


First 


1 


16 


17 


First 


1 


16 


17 


Third 





17 


17 


Second 


.. 


1<5 


16 


Reserve Art y 
Nineteenth 


2 

2 


18 
L3 


15 
15 


Fifteenth 




15 


15 



The loss in the Eleventh Ohio Battery occurred almost entirely in one action, 1!) of its men 
having l>een killed or mortally wounded at Inka in a charge on the battery. In the other 
batteries, however, the losses represent a long series of battles in which they rendered effective 
service, and participated with honor to themselves and the arm of the service to which they 
belonged. 

Among the light batteries of the Regular Army, equally heavy losses occurred in the 
following famous commands : 



B" 
"K" 
"I" 
"D" 

"C" 
"H" 



4th U. S. Artillery 
4th U. S. Artillery 
1st U. S. Artillery 
5th U. S. Artillery 
5th U. S. Artillery 
5th U. S. Artillery 






Gibbon s" or "Stewart s." 



A & C 4th U. S. Artillery 



DeRussey s" 
"Ricketts" 
"Griffin s" 
"Seymour s" 
"Gunther s" 
"HazzardV 



" "Seeley s." 

" "Kirby s" 

" "Hazlitt s." 

" "Ransom s" 

" "Burnham s." 

" "Cushing s" 



or Woodruff s. 
" "Weir s." 
" "Thomas ." 



The foregoing pages show accurately the limit of loss in the various regimental 
organizations in the civil war. The figures will probably fall below the prevalent idea as to 
the numl)er killed in certain regiments ; but these figures are the only ones that the muster 
out rolls will warrant, and no others can be accepted. True, there are many errors in the 
rolls ; but they have been thoroughly revised and corrected. 

There have been too many careless, extravagant statements made regarding losses in 
action. Officei-s have claimed losses for their regiments, which are sadly at variance with the 
records which they certified as correct at the close of the war muster-out rolls which they 
made out themselves, and on which they accounted for each man in their command. If any 
veteran is surprised at the figures given here and feels disposed to question their accuracy, let 
him first carefully examine the muster-out rolls of his regiment. It will not l>e necessary to 



8 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



exaggerate the result. To the thoughtful, the truth will be sensational enough : the correct 
figures are amply heroic, and are unsurpassed in the annals of war. 

The number of men killed in a regiment during its term of service has thus far been 
considered only in respect to the maximum of loss, and the result is of value only so far as it 
defines the limit of casualties to which regiments of this size are exposed. But, though similar 
in formation, the regiments varied in numbers according to the recruits or transferred men 
received. Some regiments received large numbers of recruits to make good their losses, while 
other commands went through the war with constantly lessening ranks and carried only the 
original thousand, or less, upon their rolls. Some regiments which reenlisted at the end of 
their three years term received large accessions from other commands which, returning home, 
left detachments in the field "composed of recruits with unexpired terms, or reenlisted men. 
Distinction must be made, in the matter of losses in action, between the regiments whose 
ranks were always kept full, and the ones which received no fresh material. 

In short, the proper way to judge of the relative losses of regiments during their term 
of service is to accompany the statement of the losses with the figures of the total enrollment, 
and compare the percentages as well as the losses. The regiments in the following list can 
fairly claim the honor of having encountered the hardest fighting in the war. They may not 
have done the most effective fighting, nor the best fighting ; but they evidently stood where 
the danger was thickest, and were the ones which faced the hottest musketry. They were all 
well-known, reliable commands, and served with unblemished records. The maximum of loss 
is reached in this table : 

KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 
MAXIMUM PERCENTAGES OF ENROLLMENT. 



Regiment. 


Division* 


Corps. 


Enrolled. 


Killed. 


Per ct. 


2d Wisconsin 


Wads worth s 


First 


1203 


238 


19.7 


1st Maine H. Art y 


Birney s 


Second 


2202 


423 


19.2 


57th Massachusetts 


Stevenson s 


Ninth 


1052 


201 


19.1 


140h Pennsylvania 


Barlow s 


Second 


1132 


198 


17.4 


26th Wisconsin 


Schurz s 


Eleventh 


1089 


188 


17.2 


7th Wisconsin 


Wadsworth s 


First 


1630 


281 


17.2 


69th New York 


Hancock s 


Second 


1513 


259 


17.1 


llth Penn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1179 


196 


16.6 


142d Pennsylvania 


Doubleday s 


First 


935 


155 


16.5 


141st Pennsylvania 


Birney s 


Third 


1037 


167 


16.1 


19th Indiana 


Wadsworth s 


First 


1246 


199 


15.9 


121st New York 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1426 


226 


15.8 


7th Michigan 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1315 


208 


15.8 


148th Pennsylvania 


Barlow s 


Second 


1339 


210 


15.6 


83d Pennsylvania 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


1808 


282 


15.5 


22d Massachusetts 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


1393 


216 


15.5 


36th Wisconsin 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1014 


157 


15.4 


27th Indiana 


Williams s 


Twelfth 


1101 


169 


15.3 


5th Kentucky 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1020 


157 


15.3 


27th Michigan 


Willcox s 


Ninth 


1485 


225 


15.1 


79th U. S. Colored 


Thayer s 


Seventh 


1249 


188 


15.0 


17th Maine 


Birney s 


Third 


1371 


207 


15.0 


1st Minnesota 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1242 


187 


15.0 










, mention 



TUTAI, KNKOU.MKNTS. 9 

The loss in tin- Sr. mid \Vismnsiii indicates the extreme limit of danger to which human 
lii e is exposed in a war similar in duration and activity to the American Civil War. It shows 
the ch;m< -es which a man takes when he enlists. The figures, however, are the result of the 
weapons and mode of fighting of twenty years ago. Since then, muzzle-loading rifles have 
l)een dispensed with. Still, in the Franco-Prussian war, in which the troops were armed with 
breech-loaders, there was no increase in the percentage of casualties. In fact, the old muzzle- 
loaders were capahle of delivering a hotter fire than any body of troops could withstand. At 
Marye s Heights and Cemetery Ridge, the bravest of assaulting columns recoiled from their 
fire ; breech -loaders could have done no more. There was a limit of punishment beyond 
which endurance would not go, and the old Springfield rifle was capable of inflicting it. 

Hut the figures of the Second Wisconsin, and of the other regiments as well, fail to show 
the full percentage of loss : the actual percentage was much larger. The figures given are 
based upon the total enrollment of the regiment, and necessarily include the non-combatants- 
the musicians, teamsters, company cooks, officers servants, Surgeon s assistants, and Quarter 
master s men ; also, the sick, the detailed men, and absentees of all kinds. If the percentage 
were based on the numlxn 1 of men who were accustomed to follow the colors into action, 
the figures would be still more startling. But there is no place to draw a dividing line, 
and so the total enrollment must be taken. As all regiments were pretty much alike 
in respect to the number of non-combatants, it shows fairly their relative positions in 
I>oint of loss. 

These figures, let it be remembered, include only the killed and mortally wounded. To 
understand their full significance, one must bear in mind the additional loss of wounded men 
who survived their injuries many of them surviving only to drag their marred and crippled 
lives along a lower plane of existence. In the Second Wisconsin nearly i)oo men were killed 
or wounded, leaving but few unharmed of those who carried arms. 

In stating the total enrollment of a regiment, the statistician is often in doubt as to what 
figures may be fairly used. In the Second Wisconsin there were two companies K. The first 
one remained with the regiment but a few weeks and was then permanently detached. Its 
place was taken by another company which was recruited in October, 1861. It would, 
manifestly, be unfair to include both companies in the enrollment, and so the first was not 
counted. Yet, the first company K was with the regiment in the battle of First Bull Run, 
and lost in that action one man killed and two missing. As this loss is included in the figures 
given for the Second Wisconsin, absolute accuracy would demand their subtraction before 
calculating the percentage. The regiment would, however, still remain at the head of the list 
in the table of percentages. 

In the case of the First Maine Heavy Artillery a careful discrimination was also necessary. 
The enrollment given here includes the original regiment, together with all recruits received 
prior to the close of the war. But, in June, 1865 two months after the war had closed the 
regiment received a large accession from the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Maine Infantry. 
These latter commands had been mustered out, upon which the recruits with unexpired 
terms of service were transferred to the First Maine Heavy Artillery. These men trans 
ferred after the war had ended are not included in the enrollment, as they formed no part 
of the body under consideration in the matter of percentage of loss. Their number had 
already entered into the calculation of the regiments in which they had previously served. A 
careful examination of the rolls of the First Maine Heavy Artillery, name by name, shows 
that 2202 men only were enrolled prior to the surrender at Appomattox. 

A similar case is found in the Fifty-seventh Massachusetts, which carried 1052 names, 
officers and enlisted men, on its rolls up to the close of the war. On the !>th of August, 1865- 
four months after the fighting had ceased its rolls were increased by a transfer of the 



10 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Fifty-ninth Massachusetts, which was consolidated with it. The names thus added were not 
included in the enrollment under consideration. 

In the following table will be found every regiment in which the loss in killed and died of 
Avounds exceeded ten per cent, of the total enrollment : 

REGIMENTAL PERCENTAGES OF KILLED 

DURING ENTIRE TERM OF SERVICE. 



Regiment. 


Division.* 


Corps. 


Enrolled. 


Killed. 


Per Ct. 


2d Connecticut (H. A.) 


Wright s 


Sixth 


2506 


254 


10.1 


Tth Connecticut 


Terry s 


Tenth 


1657 


169 


10.1 


14th Connecticut 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1724 


205 


11.8 


9th Illinois 


Dodge s 


Sixteenth 


1493 


216 


14.4 


12th Illinois 


Dodge s 


Sixteenth 


1207 


148 


12.2 


20th Illinois 


Logan s 


Seventeenth 


1092 


139 


12.7 


22d Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


1123 


147 


13.0 


27th Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


1078 


115 


10.6 


35th Illinois 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


987 


109 


11.0 


36th Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


1376 


204 


14.8 


40th Illinois 


C. R. Woods 


Fifteenth 


1017 


125 


12.2 


41st Illinois 


Lauman s 


Sixteenth 


1029 


115 


11.1 


42d Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


1622 


181 


11.1 


44th Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


1344 


135 


10.0 


55th Illinois 


Blair s 


Fifteenth 


1099 


157 


14.2 


73d Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


994 


114 


11.4 


82d Illinois 


Schurz s 


Eleventh 


956 


102 


10.6 


84th Illinois 


Stanley s 


Fourth 


987 


124 


12.5 


88th Illinois 


Sheridan s 


Fourth 


926 


103 


11.1 


89th Illinois 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1318 


133 


10.0 


93d Illinois 


Quinby s 


Seventeenth 


1011 


151 


14.9 


104th Illinois 


Carlin s 


Fourteenth 


999 


116 


11.6 


6th Indiana 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1091 


125 


11.4 


14th Indiana 


French s 


Second 


1134 


150 


13.2 


19th Indiana 


Wadsworth s 


First 


1246 


199 


15.9 


20th Indiana 


Birney s 


Third 


1403 


201 


14.3 


27th Indiana 


Williams s 


Twelfth 


1101 


169 


15.3 


30th Indiana 


Stanley s 


Fourth 


1126 


137 


12.1 


32d Indiana 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1283 


171 


13.8 


36th Indiana 


Stanley s 


Fourth 


1118 


113 


10.1 


40th Indiana 


Newton s 


Fourth 


1473 


148 


10.0 


3d Iowa 


Lauman s 


Sixteenth 


1099 


127 


11.5 


5th Iowa 


Quinby s 


Seventeenth 


1042 


117 


11.2 


6th Iowa 


Corse s 


Sixteenth 


1102 


152 


13.7 


9th Iowa 


C. R. Woods s 


Fifteenth 


1229 


154 


12.5 



* Most regiments served under more than one division commander, and some of them in more than one corps : for lack of space, mention 
Is made here only of the division which will best assist the reader in identifying the regiment and its campaigns. 



RK<;IMKNTAI, PKIU KNT.UJES OF KILI.I i> 



11 



Ktgimtnt. 
13tll low; I 

22d Iowa 
24th Iowa 

3d Kentucky 

5th Kentucky 

6th Kentucky 

15th Kentucky 

1st Maine <H. A.) 

4th Maine 

6th Maine 

7th Maine 
17th Maine 
19th Maine 
31st Maine 

2d Massachusetts 
9th Massachusetts 
10th Massachusetts 
12th Massachusetts 
15th Massachusetts 
16th Massachusetts 
20th Massachusetts 
21st Massachusetts 
22d Massachusetts 
25th Massachusetts 
28th Massachusetts 
34th Massachusetts 
36th Massachusetts 
37th Massachusetts 
56th Massachusetts 
57th Massachusetts 
58th Massachusetts 

1st Michigan (S. S.) 

1st Michigan 

2d Michigan 

3d Michigan 

4th Michigan 

5th Michigan 

7th Michigan 

8th Michigan 
16th Michigan 
17th Michigan 
2()th Michigan 
iMth Michigan 
iMth Michigan 
-!7th Michigan 



Division. 

Me Arthur s 
G rover s 
G rover s 

Newton s 
T. J. Wood s 
T. J. Wood s 
Johnson s 

Birney s 

Birney s 

Wright s 

Getty s 

Birney s 

Gibbon s 

Potter s 

Williams s 

Griffin s 

Getty s 

Robinson s 

Gibbon s 

Humphreys s 

Gibbon s 

Stevenson s 

Griffin s 

Weitzel s 

Barlow s 

Tlioburn s 

Potter s 

Getty s 

Stevenson s 

Stevenson s 

Potter s 

Willcox s 

Morell s 

Willcox s 

Birney s 

Griffin s 

Birney s 

Gibbon s 

Willcox s 

Griffin s 

Willcox s 

Willcox s 

Wads worth s 

Barlow s 

Willcox s 



Corps. 

Seventeenth 


Enrolled. 

1118 


Killed. 
119 


Per Ct. 
10.7 


Nineteenth 


1067 


114 


10.6 


Nineteenth 


1207 


128 


10.6 


Fourth 


1035 


109 


10.5 


Fourth 


1020 


157 


15.3 


Fourth 


960 


115 


11.9 


Fourteenth 


956 


137 


14.:{ 


Second 


2202 


423 


19.2 


Third 


1440 


170 


11.8 


Sixth 


1213 


153 


12.6 


Sixth 


1505 


152 


10.0 


Third 


1371 


207 


15.0 


Second 


1441 


192 


13.3 


Ninth 


1395 


183 


13.1 


Twelfth 


1305 


1-7 


14.3 


Fifth 


1654 


209 


12.6 


Sixth 


1218 


134 


11.0 


First 


1522 


193 


12.6 


Second 


1701 


241 


14.1 


Third 


1335 


150 


11.2 


Second 


1978 


260 


13.1 


Ninth 


1178 


159 


13.4 


Fifth 


1393 


216 


15.5 


Eighteenth 
Second 


1371 
1778 


161 

250 


11.7 
14.0 


Eighth 
Ninth 


1309 
1073 


135 
111 


10.3 
10.3 


Sixth 


1324 


169 


12.7 


Ninth 


1047 


126 


12.0 


Ninth 


1052 


201 


19.1 


Ninth 


1032 


139 


13.4 


Ninth 


1101 


137 


12.4 


Fifth 


1329 


187 


14.0 


Ninth 


1725 


225 


13.0 


Third 


1238 


158 


12.7 


Fifth 


1325 


189 


14.2 


Third 


1883 


263 


13.9 


Second 


1315 


20S 


15.S 


Ninth 


1770 


223 


12.5 


Fifth 


1929 


247 


12.8 


Ninth 


1137 


135 


11.8 


Ninth 


1114 


124 


11. 1 


First 


1654 


189 


11.4 


Second 


1210 


121 


10.0 


Ninth 


1485 


225 


15.1 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment. 

1st Minnesota 

10th Missouri 
llth Missouri 
12th Missouri 
15th Missouri 
26th Missouri 

3d New Hampshire 

7th New Hampshire 

12th New Hampshire 

1st New Jersey 

3d New Jersey 
14th New Jersey 
15th New Jersey 

5th New York 

8th New York (H. A.) 

44th New York 

48th New York 

49th New York 

51st New York 

61st New York 

64th New York 

69th New York 

70th New York 

72d New York 

73d New York 

76th New York 

82d New York 

83d New York 

84th New York 

86th New York 

88th New York 
100th New York 
109th New York 
lllth New York 
1 14th New York 
115th New York 
121st New York 
124th New York 
126th New York 
137th New York 
148th New York 
149th New York 
155th New York 
164th New York 



Division. 


Corps. 


Enrolled. 


Killed. 


Per Ct. 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1242 


187 


15.0 


Quinby s 


Seventeenth 


977 


101 


10.3 


Mower s 


Sixteenth 


945 


104 


11.0 


Osterhaus s 


Fifteenth 


931 


112 


12.0 


Newton s 


Fourth 


904 


115 


12.7 


Quinby s 


Seventeenth 


972 


118 


12.1 


Terry s 


Tenth 


1725 


198 


11.4 


Terry s 


Tenth 


1718 


184 


10.7 


Humphreys s 


Third 


1450 


181 


12.4 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1324 


153 


11.5 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1238 


157 


12.6 


Ricketts s 


Sixth 


1312 


147 


11.2 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1702 


240 


14.1 


Sykes 


Fifth 


1508 


177 


11.7 


Gibbon s 


Second 


2575 


361 


14.0 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


1365 


182 


13.3 


Terry s 


Tenth 


2173 


236 


10.8 


Getty s 


Sixth 


1312 


141 


10.7 


Potter s 


Ninth 


2020 


202 


10.0 


Barlow s 


Second 


1526 


193 


12.6 


Barlow s 


Second 


1313 


173 


13.1 


Barlow s 


Second 


1513 


259 


17.1 


Hooker s 


Third 


1226 


190 


15.4 


Hooker s 


Third 


1250 


161 


12.8 


Hooker s 


Third 


1326 


156 


11.7 


Wadsworth s 


First 


1491 


173 


11.6 


Gibbon s 


"Second 


1452 


181 


12.4 


Robinson s 


First 


1413 


156 


11.0 


Wadsworth s 


First 


1365 


162 


11.8 


Birney s 


Third 


1524 


172 


11.2 


Barlow s 


Second 


1352 


151 


11.1 


Terry s 


Tenth 


1491 


202 


13.5 


Willcox s 


Ninth 


1353 


165 


12-. 1 


Barlow s 


Second 


1780 


220 


12.3 


Dwight s 


Nineteenth 


1134 


121 


10,6 


Ames s 


Tenth 


1196 


135 


11.2 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1426 


226 


15.8 


Birney s 


Third 


1320 


148 


11.2 


Barlow s 


Second 


1036 


153 


14.7 


Geary s 


Twelfth 


1111 


127 


11.4 


Brooks s 


Eighteenth 


1065 


116 


10.8 


Geary s 


Twelfth 


1286 


133 


10.3 


Gibbon s 


Second 


830 


114 


13.7 


Gibbon s 


Second 


928 


116 


11.4 



REGIMENTAL | KKCKNTA<;I-:S <>K KII.I.KD. 



13 



AVj;/w<7//. 


Division. 


Corps. 


Enrolled. 


KilU-d. 


Ptr Ct. 


170th New York 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1002 


129 


12.S 


1st Ohio 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1160 


121 


10.4 


7th Ohio 


Geary s 


Twelfth 


1365 


184 


13.4 


8th Ohio 


(ribbon s 


Second 


1032 


132 


12.7 


14th Ohio 


Brannan s 


Fourteenth 


1404 


146 


10.3 


loth Ohio 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1654 


179 


lo.s 


21st Ohio 


Johnson s 


Fourteenth 


1398 


172 


12.8 


30th Ohio 


Blair s 


Fifteenth 


1115 


128 


11.4 


33d Ohio 


Baird s 


Fourteenth 


1284 


137 


10.6 


41st Ohio 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1423 


176 


12.3 


46th Ohio 


Hazen s 


Fifteenth 


1111 


134 


12.0 


49th Ohio 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1468 


202 


13.7 


55th Ohio 


Steinwehr s 


Eleventh 


1392 


143 


10.2 


65th Ohio 


Newton s 


Fourth 


1216 


122 


10.0 


73d Ohio 


Steinwehr s 


Eleventh 


L267 


171 


13.4 


93d Ohio 


T. J. Wood s 


Fourth 


1068 


113 


10.5 


98th Ohio 


Davis s 


Fourteenth 


1152 


120 


10.4 


110th Ohio 


Ricketts s 


Sixth 


1165 


126 


10.8 


113th Ohio 


Davis s 


Fourteenth 


1113 


120 


10.7 


120th Ohio 


Ricketts s 


Sixth 


1254 


152 


12.1 


5th Ponn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1046 


141 


13.5 


(5th Perm. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1059 


110 


10.3 


8th Perm. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1062 


158 


14. s 


9th Penn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1088 


137 


12.5 


loth Penn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1150 


160 


13.9 


llth Penn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1 1 79 


196 


16. 6 


13th Penn. Reserves 


Crawford s 


Fifth 


1165 


162 


13.9 


llth Pennsylvania 


Robinson s 


Fii-st 


2052 


236 


Ll.fi 


45th Pennsylvania 


Potter s 


Ninth 


I960 


227 


Ll.fi 


46th Pennsylvania 


Williams s 


Twelfth 


1 7 .4 


17 . 


In. ii 


49th Pennsylvania 


Wright s 


Sixth 


131** 


193 


i4.<; 


55th Pennsylvania 


Ames s 


Tenth 


1820 


208 


n.i 


61st Pennsylvania 


Getty s 


Sixth 


1987 


237 


L1.9 


62d Pennsylvania 

mf 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


1571 


169 


lo.7 


63d Pennsylvania 


Birney s 


Third 


1 34 1 


186 


13.8 


69th Pennsylvania 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1715 


178 


10.3 


72d Pennsylvania 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1596 


193 


12.9 


81st Pennsylvania 


Barlow s 


Second 


1608 


208 


12.9 


83d Pennsylvania 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


1808 


282 


15.5 


84th Pennsylvania 


Humphreys * 


Third 


1241 


125 


10.0 


96th Pennsylvania 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1 1 53 


132 


11.4 


looth Pennsylvania 


Stevenson s 


Ninth 


2014 


224 


11.1 


105th Pennsylvania 


Birney s 


Third 


L992 


245 


12.2 


106th Pennsylvania 


Gibbon s 


Second 


1004 


104 


10.3 


118th Pennsylvania 


Griffin s 


Fifth 


i27; 


141 


ll.o 


ll . th Pennsylvania 


Wright s 


Sixth 


1216 


141 


ll.fi 



14 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment. 

121st Pennsylvania 
139th Pennsylvania 
140th Pennsylvania 
141st Pennsylvania 
142d Pennsylvania 
143d Pennsylvania 
145th Pennsylvania 
148th Pennsylvania 
149th Pennsylvania 
1 84th Pennsylvania 
188th Pennsylvania 

2d Vermont 

3d Vermont 

5th Vermont 

6th Vermont 
10th Vermont 
17th Vermont 

7th West Virginia 

1st Wisconsin 

2d Wisconsin 

3d Wisconsin 

6th Wisconsin 

7th Wisconsin 

21st Wisconsin 

24th Wisconsin 

26th Wisconsin 

36th Wisconsin 

37th Wisconsin 



Division. 

Doubleday s 

Getty s 

Barlow s 

Birney s 

Doubleday s 

Doubleday s 

Barlow s 

Barlow s 

Doubleday s 

Gibbon s 

Brooks s 

Getty s 

Getty s 

Getty s 

Getty s 

Ricketts s 

Potter s 

Gibbon s 

Baird s 

Wadsworth s 

Williams s 

Wadsworth s 

Wadsworth s 

Johnson s 

Newton s 

Schurz s 

Gibbon s 

Willcox s 



1st U. S. Sharpshooters* Birney s 
2d U. S. Sharpshooters Birney s 

79th U. S. Colored Inf. Thayer s 



Corps. 

First 

Sixth 

Second 

Third 

First 

First 

Second 

Second 

First 

Second 

Eighteenth 

Sixth 
Sixth 
Sixth 
Sixth 
Sixth 
Ninth 

Second 

Fourteenth 

First 

Twelfth 

First 

First 

Fourteenth 

Fourth 

Eleventh 

Second 

Ninth 

Third 
Third 

Seventh 



Enrolled. 

891 
1070 
1132 
1037 

935 
1491 
1456 
1339 
1454 

959 
1201 

1811 
1748 
1533 

1568 
1304 
1137 

1008 

1386 
1203 
1333 
1940 
1630 
1171 
1077 
1089 
1014 
1110 

1392 
1178 

1249 



Killed. 

109 
145 
198 
167 
155 
151 
205 
210 
169 
113 
124 

224 
206 
213 
203 
149 
147 

142 

157 
238 
170 
244 
281 
122 
111 
188 
157 
156 

153 
125 

188 



Per Ct. 

12.2 
13.5 
17.4 
16.1 
16.5 
10. 1 
14.1 
15.6 
11.8 
11.7 
10.3 

12.3 
11.7 
13.8 
12.9 
11.3 
12.9 

14.0 

11.3 
19.7 
12.7 
12.5 
17.2 
10.4 
10.3 
17.2 
15.4 
14.0 

10.9 
10.6 

15.0 



In some of the regiments of the preceding list, a part of the enrollment has been omitted, 
and the percentage was calculated on the number enrolled during the period of active service. 
In some cases deduction was made for large bodies of conscripts which never joined the 
regiment, although their names were borne upon the rolls ; also, for accessions of substitutes 
and drafted men who did not reach the regiment until the fighting had practically ended. 
Partial enrollments were used in calculating the percentages of the Second Massachusetts, 
Third Wisconsin, Twentieth Massachusetts, Seventh West Virginia, Eighty-second New York, 
and Eighty-third New York. 

There were many regiments which would appear in the preceding table of high percentages 
were it not that their rolls were unduly swelled by useless names ; by conscripts and merce- 

* Berdau s Sharpshooters. 



RKGIMKNT.M. PKKCKNT A<;KS <n KII.I.I ,i> 15 

naries wh<> deserted on their way to the front ; and by transfers from disbanded regiments, 
in which t<>.> large a nnml>er of the men appeared on the transfer papers only. An attempt 
has been made in the succeeding pages to render justice to such regiments by tabulating the 
original enrollment separately, and stating the percentage of killed as based on that. In the 
Fifth New Hampshire, which does not ap}X3ar in the table of high percentages, 17.!) jnjr cent, 
of the original regiment were killed or mortally wounded. 

Care was necessary, also, to avoid counting names twice, as in many regiments men were 
transferred from one company to another, their names appearing on the muster out rolls of 
each company. In the printed rolls of the New Jersey troops these men are counted twice in 
the recapitulation which appears at the end of each regimental roll, thereby increasing, appar 
ently, the quota of men furnished, but lowering the percentage of killed. Still, the printed 
rolls of the New Jersey regiments are in better shape than those of any other State, and are 
highly creditable to the authorities who had charge of the publication In the regimental 
rolls published by Massachusetts, the names of those who reenlisted appear twice ; and in all 
the State rolls names are duplicated more or less as the result of transfers or consolidation of 
companies. On the War Department records, a man who reenlisted was counted as two 
men, and so credited on the quota of the State. 

In the figures given here, pains have been taken to avoid counting a man more than once, 
the intention being that the total enrollment should show exactly the number of individuals 
who served iu each regiment. 



H 



CHAPTER II. 



MAXIMUM OF REGIMENTAL LOSS IN KILLED IN ANY ONE BATTLE - 

PROPORTION OF WOUNDED TO KILLED. 

AVING- arrived at the maximum of killed in a regiment during its term of service with 
its many battles, the question naturally arises as to the greatest number killed in any 
one action. There has been a great deal of exaggeration regarding regimental losses in 
particular battles, especially in instances where the loss was comparatively small ; while some 
regiments which really sustained heroic losses are never mentioned in this particular. The 
figures in connection with this subject are interesting, as they show the extreme limit of loss 
in human life during a battle, in a regiment of the size common to the American Armies. 
Larger figures, of course, may be found in the casualty lists of the German regiments in the 
Franco-Prussian war, but these regiments contained three times as many men. 

Although the casualty lists of a regiment are always stated in killed, wounded, and 
missing, the appended list shows only the killed, including those who died of their wounds. 
Farther on, in the "List of Battles, with Regiments sustaining Highest Loss in Each," these 
same losses are given again, showing the number of killed, wounded, and missing ; but in 
that table the mortally wounded are included with the wounded instead of with the killed. 

The surviving wounded and the missing are omitted in the following list, in order to 
emphasize the more important feature of the loss, and the consequent relative position of the 
various regiments in this respect. The losses of the different commands can be compared 
better by eliminating the somewhat indefinite factor of the wounded and missing, and tabu 
lating the regiments with regard only to the killed and died of wounds. 

This list has been prepared after a careful examination of the muster-out rolls of every 
regiment whose losses would indicate that they might possibly have a place in this column. 
In each case the rolls have been examined name by name, in order to count the ones recorded 
there as killed or mortally wounded in the battles mentioned. The list includes every regiment 
in the Union Armies which sustained, in any one battle, a loss in killed or mortally wounded 
of fifty or more. 

The First Maine Heavy Artillery took 050 officers and men into the assault on Petersburg, 
June 18th, ISfJ-t, and the Fifth New York took 4-iM) into the fight at Manassas. These figures 
must be borne in mind in case of a comparison with the maximum battle-loss of regiments in 
foreign wars. Still higher percentages, however, occurred at times during the Civil War, 
and will be found recorded farther on. 



M \\IMIM <>! 



Loss IN I AKTK i i. AK ENGAGEMENTS. 



17 



MAXIMUM OF REGIMENTAL LOSS IN KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS IN 

PARTICULAR ENGAGEMENTS. 



HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Regiment. 

1st Maine* 
8th New York 
1st Maine 
2d Connecticut 
7th New York* 
1st Massachusetts* 
9th New York* 
3d Pennsylvania 
Uth New York 
7th New York 
1st Massachusetts 
2d New York 
Oth New York 



5th New York * 
15th New Jersey 
49th Pennsylvania 
15th Massachusetts^ 

1st Kansas 

1st Missouri 

9th Illinois* 
ISth U. S. Infantry* 
llth Illinois 
121st New York* 
70th New York 
24th Michigan 
57th Massachusetts 
61st Pennsylvania 
145th Pennsylvania 
11 1th New York* 
22d Michigan 
20th Wisconsin 

9th Massachusetts 

8th U. S. Colored 
32d Iowa 
55th Illinois 

4th Vermont 
22d Massachusetts 



Battle. 

Petersburg! 
Cold Harbor 
SpotsylvaniaJ 
Cold Harbor 
Cold Harbor 

8potsylvania$ 

Cedar Creek 

Petersburg^ 
Petersburg 
Petersburg 
Petersburgf 
Petersburg^ 
Monocacy 



Division. 

Birney s 

Gibbon s 

Tyler s 

Russell s 

Barlow s 

Tyler s 

Ricketts s 

Willcox s 

W illcox s 

Barlow s 

Birney s 

Barlow s 

Ricketts s 



INFANTRY. 



Manassas 
Spotsylvania \ 
Spotsylvania || 
Antietam 
Wilson s Creek 
Wilson s Creek 
Shiloh 

Stone s River 
Fort Donelson 
Salem Church 
Williamsburg 
Gettysburg 
Wilderness 
Fair Oaks 
Fredericksburg 
Gettysburg 
Chickamauga 
Prairie Grove 
Gaines s Mill 
Olustee 
Pleasant Hill 
Shiloh 
Wilderness 
Gaines s Mill 



Sykes s 

Russell s 

Russell s 

Sedgwick s 

Lyon s 

Lyon s 

W. H. Wallace s 

Rousseau s 

McClernand s 

Brooks s 

Hooker s 

Wadsworth s 

Stevenson s 

Couch s 

Hancock s 

Alex. Hays s 

Morgan s 

Herron s 

Morell s 

Seymour s 

Mower s 

Sherman s 

Getty s 

Morell s 



Corps. 

Second 

Second 

Second 

Sixth 

Second 

Second 

Sixth 

Ninth 

Ninth 

Second 

Second 

Second 

Sixth 



F. J. Porter s 
Sixth 
Sixth 
Second 



Fourteenth 



Sixth 

Third 

First 

Ninth 

Fourth 

Second 

Second 

Reserve 

Fifth 

Tenth 

Sixteenth 



Sixtli 
Fifth 



Killed. 

210 

207 

147 

129 

127 

120 

64 

64 

57 

55 

54 

54 

51 



117 

110 

109 

10S 

10<5 

103 

103 

102 

102 

97 

97 

94 

94 

92 

91 

88 

- 

88 

87 

87 

86 

86 

84 

84 



* This regiment api>ears again in this same list. t Assault of June 18, 10M. t rYederk-ksburx Pike, May 19, 18M. 

$ Assault of June 17, ISM. Includes losses from May 8th to May I3th. 

1 1ncludes a company of the " Andrew Sharpshooters." whiuti was jnjrmanently attached to this regiment. 

2 



18 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment, 

13th U. S. Colored 
10th Ohio 
49th Ohio 

2d Wisconsin 
48th New York 
15th Kentucky 
36th Wisconsin 
24th New York 
23d U. S. Colored Inf. 

8th Illinois 
16th Wisconsin 
43d Illinois 
16th Michigan 
118th Pennsylvania 

7th New Hampshire* 
72d New York 

1st Wisconsin 
12th U. S. Infantry 
16th Maine 

1st Minnesota 

2d Vermont 
21st Illinois 
24th Iowa 
12th Massachusetts 
25th Massachusetts 

7th Iowa 

9th Iowa 
18th Illinois 
35th Massachusetts 
12th New Hampshire* 

5th Vermont* 
19th Iowa 

9th Ohio 
38th Ohio 
81st New York 
93d New York 
llth Pennsylvania 
59th New York 
69th New York 
llth Penn. Reserves 
23d Pennsylvania 
75th Illinois 
77th Ohio 
40th Illinois 

loth Illinois 



Battle. 

Nashville 
Chaplin Hillsf 
Pickett s Mills 
Manassas \ 
Fort Wagner 
Chaplin Hills 
Cold Harbor || 
Manassas 
Petersburg Mine 
Fort Donelson 
Shiloh 
Shiloh 
Games Mill 
Shepherdstown 
Fort Wagner 
Williamsburg 
Chaplin Hills 
Games Mill 
Fredericksburg 
Gettysburg 
Wilderness 
[Stone s River 
Champion s Hill 
Aiitietam 
Cold Harbor 
Belmont 
Pea Ridge 
Fort Donelson 
Antietam 
Chancellors ville 
Savage Station 
Prairie Grove 
Chickamauga 
Jonesboro 
Cold Harbor 
Wilderness 
Manassas ** 
Antietam 
Antietam 
Games Mill 
Cold Harbor 
Chaplin Hills 
Shiloh 
Shiloh 
Shiloh 



Division. 

Cruft s 

Rousseau s 

T. J. Wood s 

Hatch s 

Seymour s 

Rousseau s 

Gibbon s 

Hatch s 

Ferrero s 

McClernand s 

Prentiss s 

McClernand s 

MorelPs 

Morell s 

Seymour s 

Hooker s 

Rousseau s 

Sykes s 

Gibbon s 

Gibbon s 

Getty s 

Davis s 

Hovey s 

Ricketts s 

Martindale s 

Grant s 

E. A. Carr s 

McClernand s 

Sturgis s 

Whipple s 

W. F. Smith s 

Herron s 

Brannan s 

Baird s 

Brooks s 

Birney s 

Ricketts s 

Sedgwick s 

Richardson s 

McCall s 

Russell s 

Mitchell s 

Sherman s 

Sherman s 

Hurlbut s 



Corps. 



Fourth 
First 
Tenth 

Second 

First 

Ninth 



Fifth 
Fifth 
Tenth 
Third 

Fifth 

First 

Second 

Sixth 

Fourteenth 

Thirteenth 

First 

Eighteenth 



Ninth 
Third 
Sixth 



Fourteenth 

Fourteenth 

Eighteenth 

Second 

First 

Second 

Second 

Fifth 

Sixth 



Killed. 

84 
84 
83 
83 
83 

82 
81 

81 
81 
81 
79 

78 
78 
78 
77 
77 
77 
76 
76 
75 
75 
75 
75 
74 
74 
74 
74 
74 
73 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
70 



* This regiment ap]>ears again in this same list. t Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 18G2. % This loss occurred at Gainesville on the 29th 

The First Corps was designated in that campaign the "Third Corps, Army of Virginia." 
.Time 1st. 49 killed ; June 3d, 32 killed. 1. Includes loss at Knob Gap. ** Includes 22 killed at Thoroughfare Gap. 



MAXIMIM OK UKCJIMKNT VL Loss IN I AKTHILAK ENGAGEMENTS. 



19 



Regimatt, 

73d New York 

147th New York 

16th Connecticut 

93d Illinois 

22d Iowa 

97th Pennsylvania 

203d Pennsylvania 

/ 

6th Vermont 

5th New Hampshire* 

9th New Hampshire 
19th Maine 

:id Vermont 

7th U. S. Colored 
Uth Ohio 

8th Iowa 
32d Illinois 
84th Illinois 

6th New Hampshire 
67th New York 
148th Pennsylvania 
149th Pennsylvania 
18th Kentucky 
96th Illinois 

3d New Hampshire 
12th New Hampshire 
30th New York 
100th New York 
142d Pennsylvania 
ir> 1st Pennsylvania 

2d Michigan 

26th Pennsylvania 
36th Illinois 
82d New York 
146th New York 

46th Ohio 

28th Pennsylvania 

72d Pennsylvania 

4th New York 
126th New York 

3d Ohio 
21st Wisconsin 

5th U. S. Colored 

5th Vermont 

8th New York 

6th Iowa 
105th Ohio 

5th Iowa 



Rattle. 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Antietam 

Champion s Hill 

Vicksburg (May 22) 

Bermuda Hundred 

Fort Fisher 

Wilderness 

Cold Harbor 

Spotsylvania 

Gettysburg 

Wilderness 

Fort Gi liner 

Chickamauga 

Shiloh 

Shiloh 

Stone s River 

Manassas 

Fair Oaks 

Spotsylvania 

Gettysburg 

Richmond 

Chickamauga 

Drewrv s Bluff 

V 

Cold Harbor 

Manassas 

Fort Wagner 

Fredericksburg 

Gettysburg 

Petersburg t 

Gettysburg 

Stone s River 

( i.-n \ sburg 

Wilderness 

Shiloh 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Chaplin Hills 

Chaplin Hills 

Chaffin s Farm 

Wilderness 

Cross Keys 

Shiloh 

Chaplin Hills 

luka 



Division, 


Corps. 


Kilted. 


Huiuphreys s 


Third 


70 


Wadsworth s 


First 


76 


Sturgis s 


Ninth 


7o 


Crocker s 


Seventeenth 


70 


E. A. Carr s 


Thirteenth 


70 


Ames s 


Tenth 


7i 


Ames s 


Tenth 


6!i 


Getty s 


Sixth 


69 


Barlow s 


Second 


69 


Potter s 


Ninth 


68 


Gibbon s 


Second 


68 


Getty s 


Sixth 


68 


Paine s 


Eighteenth 


6S 


Brannan s 


Fourteenth 


68 


W. H. Wallace s 




6s 




Hurlbut s 




68 




Palmer s 


Fourteenth 


67 


Reno s 


Ninth 


67 


Couch s 


Fourth 


67 


Barlow s 


Second 


67 


Doubleday s 


First 


67 


Nelson s 




66 




Steed man s 


Reserve 


r.6 


Terry s 


Tenth 


66 


Brooks 


Eighteenth 


66 


Hatch s 


First 


66 


Seymour s 


Tenth 


66 


Meade s 


First 


66 


Doubleday s 


First 


66 


Wlllcox s 


Ninth 


65 


Humphreys s 


Third 


t;;. 


Sheridan s 


Fourteenth 


65 


Gibbon s 


Second 


65 


Ay res s 


Fifth 


65 


Sherman s 




65 




Greene s 


Twelfth 


64 


Gibbon s 


Second 


64 


French s 


Second 


64 


Alex. Hays s 


Second 


64 


Rousseau s 





64 


Rousseau s 





64 


Paine s 


Eighteenth 


68 


Getty s 


Sixth 


63 


Blenker s 





63 


Sherman s 





63 


Jackson s 




75 




Hamilton s 





62 



* This 



:ii>| tears a^ain hi tins same list. 



t Assault uf.Iim. 17, ltd. 



20 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAK. 



19th 
141st 
8th 
98th 
140th 
83d 
Oth 
87th 
10th 
125th 
8th 
26th 
121st 
134th 
27th 
14th 
6th 
lllth 
63d 
76th 
83d 
96th 
2Sth 
31st 
47th 
55th 
125th 
26th 
54th 
3d 
42d 
157th 
118th 
124th 
14th 
7th 
143d 
150th 
22d 
46th 
7th 
37th 
1st 
2d 
28th 
6th 



Regiment. 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania 

Michigan 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 

U. S. Colored 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Illinois 

Kansas 

Wisconsin* 

New York 

New York 

Michigan 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania* 

Pennsylvania 

Illinois 

Illinois 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts (Col d) 

New Jersey 

New York 

New York 

New York 

New York 

New Jersey 

Michigan 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin* 

Wisconsin* f 

Delaware 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts 

Maine 



Battle. 

Manassas 

Chancellorsville 

James Island 

Chaplin Hills 

Gettysburg 

Games Mill 

Chaffin s Farm 

Chickamauga 

Champion s Hill 

Kenesaw 

Chickamauga 

Gettysburg 

Spotsylvania 

Gettysburg 

Spotsylvania 

Opequon 

Williamsburg 

Wilderness 

Antietam 

Fort Wagner 

Spotsylvania 

Spotsylvania 

Shiloh 

Fort Donelson 

Cedar Creek 

Drewry s Bluff 

Antietam 

Opequon 

Fort Wagner 

Games Mill 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Drewry s Bluff 

Chancellorsville 

Cold Harbor 

Antietam 

Wilderness 

Gettysburg 

Chaplin Hills 

Shiloh 

Wilderness 

Petersburg 

Antietam 

Cedar Mountain 

Manassas 

Rappahannock Sta. 



Division. 

Hatch s 

Birney s 

Stevens s 

Jackson s 

Caldwell s 

Morel! s 

Paine s 

Brannan s 

Crocker s 

Davis s 

Davis s 

Schurz s 

Russell s 

Steinwehr s 

Willcox s 

Grover s 

Hooker s 

Barlow s 

Richardson s 

Seymour s 

Griffin s 

Wright s 

Hurlbut s 

McClernand s 

Dwight s 

Ames s 

Williams s 

Grover s 

Seymour s 

Slocum s 

Sedgwick s 

Schurz s 

Brooks s 

Whipple s 

Ricketts s 

Sedgwick s 

Wadsworth s 

Doubleday s 

Mitchell s 

Hurlbut s 

Wadsworth s 

Willcox s 

French s 

Williams s 

Stevens s 

Wright s 



Corps. 

First 
Third 



Second 

Fifth 

Eighteenth 

Fourteenth 

Seventeenth 

Fourteenth 

Twentieth 

Eleventh 

Sixth 

Eleventh 

Ninth 

Nineteenth 

Third 

Second 

Second 

Tenth 

Fifth 

Sixth 



Nineteenth 

Tenth 

Twelfth 

Nineteenth 

Tenth 

Sixth 

Second 

Eleventh 

Eighteenth 

Third 

Sixth 

Second 

First 

First 



First 

Ninth 

Second 

Twelfth 

Ninth 

Sixth 



Killed. 

62 

62 

61 

66 

61 

61 

61 

61 

61 

61 

61 

61 

60 

60 

60 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

59 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

57 

56 

56 

56 

56 



This regiment appears again in this same list + Assault of Juno 17, 1864. % Assault of July 11, 186-1 not the main assault. 

S Banks Corps, then designated but for a short time only the " Seeond Corps, Army of Virginia." 



MAXIMUM OF RKUIMKNTAL Loss IN PARTICULAR KNUAUKMKNTS. 



"21 



Rfgintfnt. 

7th New York 
164th New York 
69th Pennsylvania 
105th Pennsylvania* 
1 19th Pennsylvania 
46th Pennsylvania* 
188th Pennsylvania 
Oth Illinois 
38th Illinois 
37th Wisconsin 
5th New York 
140th New York 
155th New York 
Oth New York 
21st New York 
40th New York 
1 12th New York 
115th New York 
120th New York 
17th Maine 
18th Massachusetts 
37th Massachusetts 
1st Michigan 
4th Michigan 
7th Ohio 

18th U. S. Infantry 
10th Vermont 
2d Iowa 
71st Indiana 
79th Pennsylvania 
105th Pennsylvania 
26th Michigan 
26th Wisconsin 
10th Wisconsin 
38th Ohio 
26th Indiana 
llth Iowa 
13th Iowa 
15th Indiana 
4th New Jersey 
24th New Jersey 
49th New York 
137th New York 

1st Michigan (S. S.) 
26th Ohio 
65th Ohio 



Battle. 

Fredericksburg 

Cold Harl)or 

( Jettyshurg 

Wilderness 

Spotsylvania 

Cedar Mountain 

Cold Harhor 

Fort Donelson 

Stone s River 

Petershurg Mine 

Games Mill 

Wilderness 

Cold Harlwr 

Antietani 

Manassas 

Wilderness 

Cold Harbor 

Olustee 

Gettysburg 

Wilderness 

Manassas 

Wilderness 

Manassas 

Malvern Hill 

Cedar Mountain 

Chickamauga 

Cold Harl>or 

Fort Donelson 

Richmond 

Chaplin Hills 

Fair Oaks 

Spotsylvania 

Chancellorsville 

Chaplin Hills 

Chickasaw Bluffs 

Prairie Grove 

Shiloh 

Atlanta (July 22d) 

Stone s River 

Games Mill 

Fredericksburg 

Spotsylvania 

Gettysburg 

Spotsylvania 

Chickamauga 

Stone s River 



Division. 

Hancock s 

Gibbon s 

Gihlxm s 

Birney s 

Russell s 

Williams s 

Brooks s 

C. F. Smith s 

Davis s 

Willcox s 

Sykes s 

Griffin s 

Gibbon s 

Rodman s 

Hatch s 

Birney s 

Devens s 

Seymour s 

Humpbreys s 

Birney s 

Morell s 

Getty s 

Morell s 

Morell s 

Augur s 

Baud s 

Ricketts s 

C. F. Smith s 

Nelson s 

Rousseau s 

Kearny s 

Barlow s 

Schurz s 

Rousseau s 

Steele s 

Herron s 

McClernand s 

Giles A. Smith s 

T. J. Wood s 

Slocum s 

French s 

Getty s 

Geary s 

Willcox s 

T. J. Wood s 

T. J. Wood s 



Corps, 

Second 

Second 

Second 

Second 

Sixth 

Twelfth f 

Eighteenth 

Fourteenth 

Ninth 

Fifth 

Fifth 

Second 

Ninth 

First 

Second 

Tenth 

Tenth 

Third 

Second 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Fifth 

Fifth 

Twelfth 

Fourteenth 

Sixth 



Third 

Second 

Eleventh 



Fifteenth 



Seventeenth 

Fourteenth 

Sixth 

Second 

Sixth 

Twelfth 

Ninth 

Twenty-first 

Fourteenth 



Kitted. 

5C 
56 
5C 
56 
60 
55 
65 
55 
55 
55 
65 
55 
55 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 

. 54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
53 
53 
53 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
62 
52 
52 
52 
52 



* This regiment api>ears again in this same list. 

t Banks Corps, then designated but for a short time only the " Second Corps, Army of Virginia. 



22 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE ClVIL WAR. 



6th 

21st 
101st 

8th 
47th 
12th 

7th 

5th 
46th 
14th 
20th 
80th 
26th 
26th 
64th 
83d 
12th 

2d 
24th 



Regiment. 

Ohio 

Ohio 

Ohio 

Connecticut 

Indiana 

Wisconsin 

New Hampshire 

New Hampshire 

Pennsylvania 

Illinois 

New York 

New York 

New York* 

New York 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

Missouri 

Minnesota 

Indiana 



Battk. 

Stone s River 

Chickamauga 

Stone s River 

Antietam 

Champion s Hill 

Atlanta (July 22d) 

Olustee 

Fredericksburg 

Peach Tree Creek 

Shiloh 

Antietam 

Manassas 

Fredericksbur 

Antietam 

Fair Oaks 

Malvern Hill 

Vicksburg (May 22) 

Chickamauga 

Champion s Hill 



Division. 

Palmer s 

Negley s 

Davis s 

Rodman s 

Hovey s 

Leggett s 

Seymour s 

Hancock s 

Williams s 

Hurlbut s 

W. F. Smith s 

Hatch s 

Gibbon s 

Ricketts s 

Richardson s 

Morell s 

Steele s 

Brannan s 

Hovey s 



Corps. 

Fourteenth 

Fourteenth 

Fourteenth 

Ninth 

Thirteenth 

Seventeenth 

Tenth 

Second 

Twentieth 



Sixth 

First 

First 

First 

Second 

Fifth 

Fifteenth 

Fourteenth 

Thirteenth 



Killed. 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



There are certain regiments which do not appear in the foregoing table, and yet they 
were regiments which had encountered an unusual amount of hard fighting. They had been 
in too many battles and sustained heavy losses in too many of them, to allow a surpris 
ing loss in any one. Notably among such were the Twentieth and Twenty-eighth Massachu 
setts, the Fourteenth Connecticut, the Ninth Maine, the Second New Hampshire, the Forty- 
fourth, Fifty-first, and Sixty-first New York, the Forty-fifth, Fifty-third, Eighty- first, and 
One Hundredth Pennsylvania, the Fifth Michigan, the Fifth and Sixth Wisconsin, the 
Twentieth and Twenty-seventh Indiana, the Fifteenth Ohio, and the Forty-second Illinois. 

In these figures the mortally wounded are included with the killed, as the object is to 
state clearly the loss of life in each instance instead of the total casualties. The proportion 
of the wounded to the number killed or died of wounds is very near 2.5. This ratio is based 
on the figures, after the mortally wounded have been deducted from the wounded and added 
to the killed. 

This ratio of 2. 5 must not be confounded with the one representing the usual propor 
tion of wounded to killed, as shown in statements of aggregate losses in battle. In such 
losses the proportion of wounded to the killed is about 4.8, the mortally wounded being 
always included with the wounded ; for the casualty lists are made up at the close of the 
battle, and with the killed are included only those who died on the field. In all such state 
ments of killed, wounded, and missing the mortally wounded are necessarily included 
with the wounded, and the word killed refers only to those who were killed outright, or died 
within a few hours. 

The proportion of 4. 8 is an average ratio as regards the aggregate of losses in battle, but 
is not a constant one. It varies somewhat, the proportion of killed increasing where the 
fighting is close and destructive, while in long range fighting the proportion of wounded 
increases. 



* This regiment appears again in this same list. 



PROPORTION "1 \VOUNDKD TO KlI.I.Kh 



PROPORTION OF WOUNDED TO KILLED. 



Rattles. Killed. 

Shiloh. 1,754 

Mill Springs . 30 

Fort Donelson . 500 

Pea Ridge . 203 

New Berne 90 

Kernsto wn 118 

Williamsburg... 45(5 

Fair Oaks 790 

Seven Days. 1,734 

Cedar Mountain . 314 

Manassas - 1 , 747 

South Mountain . 325 

Grampton s Gap . 113 

Antietam. 2,108 

I uka . 141 

Corinth . 355 

Chaplin Hills . 845 

Chickasaw Bluffs . 208 

Arkansas Post. 134 

Gettysburg . 3,063 

Vicksburg Campaign. 1,514 

Port Hudson ... 707 
Rappahannock Station . 

Fort Wagner (July IS) . 240 

Mine Run . 173 

Missionary Ridge 752 

Wilderness . 2,246 

Spotsyl vania . 2, 725 

North Anna and ) 

.,, f 591 

Totopotonioy 

Cold Harbor and ) ^. 
Bethesda Church I 

Petersburg, June 15-18. 1,688 

Deep Bottom 327 

Atlanta Campaign . 4,423 

Opequon 697 

Cedar Creek . 644 

21 Minor Engagements. 835 

Total. 34,532 



Wounded, 
including mortally. 

8,408 

207 
2,108 

980 

380 

450 
1,410 
3,594 
8,062 
1,445 
8,452 
1,403 

418 
9,549 

613 
1,841 
2,851 
1,005 

898 

14,492 

7,395 

3,336 

328 

880 

1,099 

4,713 

12,037 

13,416 

2,734 

9,077 

8,513 
1,851 

22,822 
3,983 
3,430 
4,597 



168,777 



Captured 
and Mining. 

2,885 

224 

201 

1 

22 

373 

647 

6,053 

622 

4,263 

85 

2 

753 

36 

324 

515 

563 

29 

5,435 

453 

819 

6 

389 

381 

349 

3,383 

2,258 

661 

1,816 

1,185 

721 
4,442 

338 
1,591 

461 

41,786 



Ratio of Wounded 
/< Killed. 

4.7 
5.3 
4.2 

4.8 
4.2 
3.H 
3.0 
4.5 
4.6 
4.5 
4.s 
4.3 
3.6 
4.5 
4.3 
5.1 
8.3 
4.8 
6.7 
4.7 
4.s 

4.7 
3.9 
3.5 
6.3 
6.2 
5.3 
4.9 

4.6 

4.9 

5.0 
5.6 
5.1 
5.7 
5.3 
5.5 

4.8 



Included in the "Captured and Missing" are many wounded men, also a large numtor 
of killed. Their relative proportion cannot 1x3 ascertained, but it probably would not differ 
enough from the usual ratio to change the average to any extent. In the preceding table the 
losses at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Cliickamauga, and Drewry s Bluff are omitted. 



24 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

In those battles the Union Armies lost possession of the field, and consequently a large 
number of the killed are included with the missing so large a number that any ratio based 
on the casualties of these battles would be misleading. 

In the German army, during the Franco-Prussian war, the proportion of wounded to 
the killed was 5.4, and the proportion of wounded to the killed and mortally wounded was 

3.02.* 

Mr. Kirkley, the statistician of the War Department, states the deaths from battles 
during the Civil War at 110,070, of which 67,058 are classified as killed in action, and 43,012 
as having died of womids. From this it appears that, 011 the average, the mortally wounded 
are equal to 64 per cent, of the killed, f Hence, the proportion of wounded to killed may be 
expressed by the following formulas, the first showing the proportion where the mortally 
wounded are included with the wounded, and the second where they are included with the 
killed. 

Killed. Wounded. Killed. Wounded. 

(a) 100 + 480 : : 580 or as 1 : 4.8 

(6) 164 + 416 : : 580 or as 1 : 2.5 

The first represents the common form used in stating the casualties at the close of an 
action ; the second represents the same loss, after the number of those who died of wounds 
has been ascertained from the muster-out rolls, and added to the killed outright. The first 
is the common one used in all military reports and histories. 

In the Surgeon-General s Report of the War, it appears that out of 235,585 cases of gun 
shot wounds treated in the hospitals, 33,653 died of their injuries a ratio of 14 per cent., and 
one which agrees closely with the conditions expressed in the preceding formulas. 

From the second formula it may be deduced, that if 110,070 were killed or mortally 
wounded in the war, the total of casualties may be further stated as : - 

Killed and Died of Wounds (official) . 110,070 

Wounded, not mortally. 275,175 



Total of killed and wounded 385,245 

If these formulas are correct they are of value, as there is no other way of arriving at the 
total number of killed and wounded in the war. There were so many minor engagements for 
which no official returns of casualties were made, that any summary of the casualties by 
battles would fall far short of the correct amount. 

The number of wounded treated at the hospitals during the war was 246,712, which, 
according to the Surgeon-General s estimate, embraced nine-tenths of all the wounded. Of 
these hospital cases, only 922 were wounded by sabres or bayonets, and a large proportion of 
these originated in private quarrels, or were inflicted by camp-guards in the discharge of 
their duty. 

This ratio of 4.8, though true in the aggregate, varies greatly in particular instances; 
though generally correct as to the loss of an army in battle, it will not always hold good for 
a particular regiment. Still, the same regiment which in some one engagement may show a 



* The loss in tho German army was 17,572 killed, 9C.187 wounded, and 14,138 missing ; total, 127,897. With the killed are included 6,210 who 
were trortally wounded, hut died within 24 hours. Tho deaths from wounds prior to May 1, 1871, increased the number of killed to 28.277. The 
missing were subsequent! y accounted for, with tho exception of 4,000. The total deaths in the German army in the field during the war were 
2H.37T killed ; died of disease or other causes, 12.400 ; total, 40.743. Total strength of the armies, 887,876. Percentage of killed, 3.1; percentage of 
deaths from all other causes, 1.4. (Dr. Engel, Director des koniglich preussisohen statistischen Bureaus.) 

t In the German Arniy-Franco-Prussian War there were 17,572 killed, and 10,707 who died of their wounds, the mortally wounded being 
equal to 01 per cent, of the killed. 

t In the Crimean War, 13.7 of the wounded died of their wounds. (Wm. Barwick Hodge, Journal of the London Statistical Society.) 



NUMBKK KILLED AT GETTYSBURG. 25 

fur different proportion, will in its aggregate of battles, show the usual ratio; particularly so 
if its losses are not complicated by too large a number of missing. 

The exact number of wounded who die of injuries received in any l>attle is an important 
element in this matter of losses in action. The man who dies under the surgeon s knife should 
be included with the killed as well as the one who, a few hours before, slowly bled to death 
upon the field. The mangled soldier who survived a day belongs with the killed as much 
as the one who was buried where he fell. And, yet, they never are. Take Gettysburg, for 
instance. The official figures for the Union loss at Gettysburg have lately been revised and 
corrected at the War Department, This final statement shows that the Union Army lost at 
Gettysburg 3,003 killed, 14,402 wounded, and 5,435 missing. But, as usual, the mortally 
wounded are included in the 14,41)2 wounded. As no further statement of this loss will he 
made by the War Department, the question arises as to how many of the wounded died of 
their injuries. How many of the Union Army were killed or died of their wounds as a result 
of the battle of Gettysburg ? What was the actual loss of life ? 

Hitherto, this hn{>ortant question has never been answered. The writer, impressed with 
its importance, has examined the rolls of each regiment which fought at Gettysburg, and 
picked off, name by name, the number of those who were killed or died of wounds in that 
greatest of historic battles. As a result, it api>ears that 5,291 men lost their lives, fighting for 
the Union on that field. To the recapitulation of losses, as published by Mr. Kirkley in 1886, 
I have attached here the numl>er of killed, as increased by those who died of wounds, three- 
fourths of whom died within a week, 

GETTYSBURG, JULY 1-3, 18G3. 



Captured Killed and 

Killed. Wounded. or Missing. Total. Died oj 

Wounds. 



General Headquarters 4 4 

1st Army Corps 503 3,200 2,222 (5,024 1,008 

2d Army Corps 700 3,180 30S 4,350 1,238 

3d Army Corps 578 3,026 000 4,2 lo 1,050 

5th Army Corps 365 1,611 211 2,187 503 

6th Army Corps 27 185 30 242 46 

llth Army Corps 368 1,022 1,511 3,801 724 

12th Army Corps 204 810 67 1,081 32o 

Cavalry Corps 00 352 407 840 152 

Reserve Artillery 4i> 187 13 242 7<> 

Total 3,063 14,402 5,435 22,000 5,201 

From these figures it appears that the Second Corps sustained the greatest loss in killed, 
although the First Corps is credited with the largest numter of casualties. The strength of 
each Corps, in infantry, present for duty equipped, June 30, 1863, was :- 

First Corps, 0,403 Fifth Corps, 11,054 Twelfth Corps, 8,103 

Second Corps, 12,363 Sixth Corps, 14,516 Cavalry Corps 14,073 

Third Corps, 11,247 Eleventh Corps, 0,107 Artillery, 6,602 

It is extremely doubtful, however, if any one of these corps carried into action four-fifths 
of this reported strength. The returns for the First Corps do not include Sk-unianl s Vermont 
Brigade (three regiments), which joined July 2d ; the two other regiments of this brigade 
were with the wagon train. 



CHAPTER III. 



PERCENTAGE OF KILLED IN REGIMENTS IN PARTICULAR BATTLES COM 
PARISON OF SUCH LOSSES WITH THOSE OF EUROPEAN REGIMENTS. 

r ~pHE loss sustained by a regiment in any battle can be properly estimated, only when the 
number of men engaged is known and taken into consideration. The small battalion in 
which fifty men were killed must not be classed, in point of loss, with the large regiment 
losing the same number. The 31 men killed in the One Hundred and Forty-first New York, 
at Peach Tree Creek, was as severe a loss as the 102 killed in the Eleventh Illinois at Fort 
Donelson. The percentage of loss in each case was the same, and the one faced as hot a fire 
as the other. 

In proportion to the number engaged, the greatest loss sustained by any regiment, during 
the war, was that of the First Minnesota at Gettysburg. This regiment was then in 
Harrow s Brigade, Gibbon s Division, Second Corps. On the afternoon of the second day at 
Gettysburg, the Union line was driven back in confusion from its position along the Emmetts- 
burg road. While Hancock w r as " patching " up a second line, he perceived a column of the 
enemy (Willcox s Brigade) emerging suddenly from a clump of trees near an unprotected 
portion of his line. The First Minnesota, alone and unsupported, was in position near by, 
and Hancock, desirous of gaining time until reinforcements could be brought forward, 
rode up to Colonel Colville and ordered him to take the enemy s colors.* A desperate 
fight ensued, in which the enemy was forced back, leaving their colors in the hands of the 
First Minnesota. Speaking of this affair afterwards, General Hancock is reported to have 
said : 

" There is no more gallant deed recorded in history. I ordered those men in there because 
I saw that I must gain five minutes time. Reinforcements were coming on the run, but I 
knew that before they could reach the threatened point the Confederates, unless checked, 
would seize the position. I would have ordered that regiment in if I had known every man 
would be killed. It had to be done, and I was glad to find such a gallant body of men at 
at hand, willing to make the terrible sacrifice that the occasion demanded. " 

The regiment took 202 officers and men into this affair, f It lost 50 killed and 174 
wounded, total, 224 casualties, nearly all of which occurred in this fight. A remarkable 
feature of this loss is that none were missing. Seventeen officers were killed or wounded, 

* " Dashing up to the Colonel, and pointing to the Confederate, column, he exclaims: Do you see those colors? Take them ! "(Gen. 
Francis A. Walker: Hist. Second Army Corps.) 

t The morning report of the First Minnesota for June 80th the last return made before the battle shows 27 officers and 358 men " present 
for duty," not including a company of sharpshooters attached (Co. L), which was not present, having been detailed as a support to Kirby s 
Battery. This number " present for duty" included the non-combatants, the Chaplain, Quartermaster, three Surgeons, Quartermaster- 
Sergeant, Commissary-Sergeant and his assistants. Hospital Steward and assistants, from ten to twenty musicians, ten company cooks, officers 
servants, and other details. Some, also, may have fallen out on the forced march to the field. 

The regiment took eight companies into this affair of July 2d. Company C was on duty at Headquarters as a provost-guard, and Company F 
had been detailed elsewhere on the field. Colonel Colville states that "the. loss on the 2d was 215 killed and wounded, out of 2(52 "; and that on 
the 3d, " Companies F and C, having rejoined, brought the number in that day s fight up to about 100 men." (Letter to Major II. D. O Brien, 
published in the " Picket Guard.") The casualties on the 8d increased the loss to 224. There were 8 officers and 91 men for duty at the close of 
the third day s battle. The number present in action on the 2d (262) is the one on which the percentage of loss should be based, or at least the 
loss for that day. The sharpshooters (Company L) did not rejoin until after the battle ; neither their number present nor their casualties have 
been included. 9 



PKUCI.M -.\;K OK KILLKD IN PARTICULAR ENGAOKMRNTS. 27 

lln- lattrr iiu -hiding the Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, Major, and Adjutant. The killed, with 
i In >se who died of their wounds, numlxM-ed 75, or over 28 per cent, of those engaged a per- 
centago of killed unequalled in military statistics.* 

The next largest percentage of killed occurred at Spotsylvania, in the Fifteenth New 
Jersey. This regiment helonged to the First Jersey Brigade, Wright s Division, Sixth 
Corps, and lost 1H killed or mortally wounded at Spotsylvania. Unlike the sudden loss of 
the First Minnesota at Gettysburg, its casualties occurred in three different actions : 31 were 
lost on May 8th, 5 on May loth, and 80 on May 12th, at the Bloody Angle. It may he urg<d 
that, these IxMiig three different affairs, the losses should not IK) consolidated. If they had 
occurred at different places, as, for instance, South Mountain and Antietam, the criticism 
would hold good ; but this fighting was done at one place, and the continuous nervous strain 
made it as heroic as if the loss had occurred in one brief charge. This regiment crossed th<> 
Itapidan May 5th, with 444 effective men.f It sustained hut a slight loss at the Wilderness, 
and took 432 officers and men into action at Spotsylvania, of whom 1 16 were killed or died of 
wounds a loss of 20 per cent. Within nine days after breaking camp, it was reduced to 5 
officers and 136 men available for action. 

Next, in percentage of killed in particular engagements, is the Twenty-fifth Massa 
chusetts at Cold Harlxn*, then in Stannard s Brigade, Martindale s Division, Eighteenth Corps. 
This loss (x:curred in the assault on the earthworks at Cold Harbor, where it was subjected 
to a terrible fire. . A Confederate officer, describing the advance of the Twenty-fifth against 
his works, writes that the heroic regiment struggled forward under a fire which seemed to 
literally annihilate them ; that the whole line seemed to disapjxar ; and he expresses wonder 
that any could have survived. The loss was 53 killed, 13!) wounded, and 2S missing, "out of 
310 reported for duty that morning. " On the following day there were only 4 officers and 
62 men left on duty. Many of the missing were killed. The muster-out rolls of the Twenty- 
fifth bear the names of 74 officers and men who were killed or mortally wounded during the 
quarter of an hour which covered that assault ; a loss of 24 per cent, in killed, and over two- 
thirds in killed and wounded. The small number taken into this action was owing to the 
heavy losses which the regiment had just sustained, a few days previous, in the Drewry s 
Bluff campaign. The Confederate officer just referred to, states further that his men were 
massed five ranks deep behind their breastworks ; that the front rank alone fired, while the 
others passed up loaded rifles, which were discharged as rapidly as they could 1x3 fired ; that, 
in addition to this, the artillery posted in the salients, poured a flanking fire of canister into 
the ranks of the doomed regiment. 

A smaller loss as to the number killed, but equally remarkable as to percentage, is found 
in the record of the One Hundred and Forty-first Pennsylvania at Gettysburg, This regiment 
was, at that time, in Graham s Brigade, Bimey s Division, Third Corps. It had already lost 
at Chancellorsville 235 (killed, wounded, and missing) out of 417 engaged there. At 
Gettysburg, only 198 answered to the morning roll call,$ of whom 25 were killed, 103 wounded, 
and 21 missing ; total, 140. The killed, with those who died of wounds, numl>ered 49, or 24 
per cent, of those engaged. The One Hundred and Forty-first fought at Gettysburg in the 

famous Peach Orchard. 

One of the most remarkable losses in the war, both in numlx rs and j>ercentage, occurred 
at Manassas, in Gen. Fitz John Porter s Corps, in the celebrated Duryee Zouaves (Fifth New 
York), of Warren s Brigade, Sykes Division. General Sykes, in his official report, states 



There have been affairs known as " massanvs," In wl.i.-Ii all. or nearly all. have lost th.-ir lives. In the hattle ..f the Uttle tt\g Horn (I 
a fight between some hostile tribes of Indians and a d.-Uwhnu-nt ..f the Seventh U. 8. Cavalry under (ten. Custer. tho entire coraman.! 
latter was annihilated. Fourteen officers and 230 enlisUxl men were killed, including (Jen. CusUjr. Not one escaped 
and fought to the death. 

t Foster : New Jersey in the Rebellion. t Capt. J. W. Denny : Hist. 25th Ma*. Vote. | 8. P. Bate. : Hlt. Pennsylvania Voto. 



28 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



that the regiment took 490 into action. It lost 79 killed, 170 wounded, and 48 missing ; total, 
297. Many of the missing were killed. The deaths from wounds increased the number 
killed to 117,* or 23 per cent, of those engaged, the greatest loss of life in any infantry 
regiment during the war, in any one battle. The regiment held an exposed position, and 
Gen. Warren states that when he endeavored to extricate them, " they were unwilling to make 
a backward movement." This is the regiment which, at Games Mill, having been badly 
thinned, closed up its ranks and counted off anew "with great coolness while exposed to 
a most terrific fire !"- -(Official Eeport.) 

The following list of percentages will indicate fairly the extent of loss in killed, to which 
a regiment is liable in battle. The number engaged is, in most cases, taken from the official 
reports. In some instances, however, the number given was ascertained from statements in 
regimental histories. 



PERCENTAGES OF KILLED IN REGIMENTS, IN PARTICULAR ENGAGEMENTS. 



Regiment. 

5th Connecticut 

7th Connecticut 

17th Connecticut 

27th Connecticut 

7th Illinois 

8th Illinois 

9th Illinois 

llth Illinois 

llth Illinois 

12th Illinois 

22d Illinois 

22d Illinois 

28th Illinois 

34th Illinois 

35th Illinois 

38th Illinois 

41st Illinois 

43d Illinois 

51st Illinois 

53d Illinois 

55th Illinois 

75th Illinois 

79th Illinois 

82d Illinois 

84th Illinois 

93d Illinois 

14th Indiana 
15th Indiana 



Battle. 

Cedar Mountain 
Fort Wagner 
Gettysburg 
Gettysburg 

Allatoona Pass 

Fort Donelson 

Shiloh 

Fort Donelson 

Shiloh 

Allatoona Pass 

Stone s River 

Chickamauga 

Shiloh 

Stone s River 

Chickamauga 

Chickamauga 

Jackson 

Shiloh 

Chickamauga 

Jackson 

Shiloh 

Chaplin Hills 

Stone s River 

Chancellorsville 

Stone s River 

Alatoona Pass 

Antietam 
Stone s River 



Division. 

Williams s 
Seymour s 
Barlow s 
CaldwelPs 



Engaged. 

424 
191 
369 

74 



Corse s 291 

McClernand s 613 
W. H. Wallace s 578 

McClernand s 500 

McClernand s 239 

Corse s 161 

Sheridan s 342 

Sheridan s 297 

Hurlbut s 558 

Johnson s 354 

Davis s 299 

Davis s 301 

Lauman s 338 

McClernand s 500 

Sheridan s 209 

Lauman s 219 

Sherman s 512 

Mitchell s 709 

Johnson s 437 

Schurz s 359 

Palmer s 357 

Corse s 290 

French s 320 

T. J. Wood s 440 



Killed, f 

48 
28 
39 
13 

48 

81 
103 
102 

24 

17 

43 

42 

58 

36 

34 

33 

44 

78 

26 

33 

83 

71 

44 

47 

67 

34 

49 

52 



Per Ci. 
11+ 

14+ 
10+ 

17+ 

16+ 
13+ 
17+ 
20+ 
10+ 
10+ 
12+ 
14+ 
10+ 
10+ 

11+ 
10+ 

13+ 

15+ 

12+ 

15 + 

16+ 

10+ 

10+ 

13+ 

18+ 

11 + 

15 + 
11+ 



* Includes four who were " wounded and missing in action," and who never returned. The names of the killed (117) are irtrai with their 
companies, in Davenport s History of the Fifth. New York. 

t Including mortally wounded. 



RKUIMKNTAI, PERCENTAOKS OK KILLED IN PAUTICULAU ENGAGEMENTS. 



29 



Ktgimmt, 

15th Indiana 
19th Indiana 
10th Indiana 
19th Indiana 
22d Indiana 
26th Indiana 
27th Indiana 
27th Indiana 
48th Indiana 
73d Indiana 
87th Indiana 

3d Iowa (Cavalry) 

3d Iowa (Inf.) 

5th Iowa 

7th Iowa (8 Cos) 

9th Iowa 
13th Iowa 
32d Iowa 
39th Iowa 

1st Kansas 
Sth Kansas 
8th Kansas 

5th Kentucky 
17th Kentucky 

1st Maine (H. A.) 

3d Maine 

4th Maine 

4th Maine 

6th Maine 

7th Maine 

Sth Maine 

9th Maine 
16th Maine 
16th Maine 
17th Maine 
19th Maine 
20th Maine 

2d Massachusetts 

2d Massachusetts 

10th Massachusetts 

12th Massachusetts 

15th Massachusetts 

15th Massachusetts 



Battle. 

Mission Ridge 

Manassas 

Autietain 

Gettysburg 

Chaplin Hills 

Prairie Grove 

Antietain 

Gettysburg 

luka 

Stone s River 

Chickamauga 

Pea Ridge 
Jackson 
luka 
Belmont 
Pea Ridge 
Atlanta (July 22) 
Pleasant Hill 
Allatoona Pass 

Wilson s Creek 
Chickamauga 

Nashville 

Stone s River 
Shiloh 

Petersburg 

Gettysburg 

Fredericksburg 

Gettysburg 

Rappahannock Sta 

Antietain 

Ware Bottom Ch. 

Petersburg 

Fredericksburg 

Gettysburg 

Wilderness 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Cedar Mountain 

Gettysburg 

Spotsylvania 

Antietain 

Antietain 

Gettysburg 



Division. 


Engaged. 


Killed. 


Per Ct. 


Sheridan s 


334 


45 


13+ 


Hatch s 


423 


02 


14 + 


Doubleday s 


202 


28 


13+ 


Wads worth s 


288 


41 


14 + 


Mitchell s 


303 


57 


18+ 


Huston s 


445 


52 


11 + 


Williams s 


409 


41 


10+ 


Williains s 


339 


40 


11 + 


Hamilton s 


434 


48 


11 + 


T. J. W r ood s 


331 


38 


11 + 


Brannan s 


380 


61 


10+ 





235 


27 


11 + 


Lainnan s 


241 


30 


14 + 


Hamilton s 


4S2 


02 


12 + 


Grant s 


410 


74 


18+ 


E. A. CUIT S 


560 


74 


13+ 


Gresham s 


4K> 


55 


13 + 


Mower s 


420 


80 


20 + 


Corse s 


280 


43 


15+ 


Lyon s 


644 


106 


10+ 


Da vis s 


406 


61 


15-f 


Beatty s (S.) 


140 


16 


11 + 


Johnson s 


320 


32 


10+ 


Hurlbut s 


250 


27 


10+ 


Birney s 


950 


210 


22 + 


Birney s 


210 


30 


14 + 


Birney s 


211 


33 


15 + 


Birney s 


2(>2 


27 


13+ 


Wright s 


321 


50 


17+ 


W. F. Smith s 


181 


25 


13+ 


Ames s 


190 


19 


10+ 


Ames s 


102 


20 


19+ 


Gibbon s 


427 


70 


17+ 


Robinson s 


248 


27 


10+ 


Birney s 


507 


54 


10 + 


Gibbon s 


440 


68 


15 + 


Barnes s 


380 


41 


10 + 


Williains s 


474 


56 


12 + 


Williains s 


816 


45 


14 + 


Getty s 


210 


20 


12 + 


Ricketts s 


334 


74 


22 + 


Sedg wick s 


606 


108 


17+ 


Giblnm s 


239 


38 


15+ 



30 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment. 


Battle. 


Division. Engaged. 


Killed. 


Per Ct. 


18th Massachusetts 


Manassas 


Morell s 


421 


54 


12 + 


19th Massachusetts 


Gettysburg 


Gibbon s 


141 


17 


12 + 


20th Massachusetts 


Fredericksburg 


Howard s 


238 


48 


20 + 


25th Massachusetts 


Cold Harbor 


Martindale s 


310 


74 


23+ 


57th Massachusetts 


Wilderness 


Stevenson s 


545 


94 


17 + 


9th Massachusetts Bat y 


Gettysburg 


Reserve Artillery 


104 


11 


10 + 


5th Michigan (Cavalry) 


Hawes Shop 


Torbert s 


150 


15 


10+ 


6th Michigan (Cavalry) 


Hawes Shop 


Torbert s 


140 


17 


12+ 


1st Michigan (Infantry) 


Manassas 


Morell s 


320 


55 


17+ 


2d Michigan 


Knoxville 


Ferrero s 


150 


28 


18 + 


3d Michigan 


Manassas 


Kearny s 


260 


41 


15 + 


4th Michigan 


Gettysburg 


Barnes s 


342 


40 


11 + 


5th Michigan 


Fair Oaks 


Kearny s 


330 


43 


13+ 


7th Michigan 


Gettysburg 


Gibbon s 


165 


27 


16+ 


8th Michigan 


James Island 


Stevens s 


534 


61 


11 + 


13th Michigan 


Stone s River 


T. J. Wood s 


225 


32 


14 + 


13th Michigan 


Chickamauga 


T. J. Wood s 


217 


26 


11 + 


16th Michigan 


Gettysburg 


Barnes s 


218 


29 


13 + 


17th Michigan 


Spotsylvania 


Willcox s 


226 


30 


13+ 


22d Michigan 


Chickamauga 


Steedman s 


584 


88 


15+ 


24th Michigan 


Gettysburg 


Wadsworth s 


496 


94 


18 + 


1st Minnesota 


Gettysburg 


Gibbon s 


262 


75 


28+ 


12th Missouri 


Vicksburg (May 


22) Steele s 


360 


39 


10 + 


2d New Hampshire 


Manassas 


Hooker s 


332 


37 


11 + 


2d New Hampshire 


Gettysburg- 


Humph reys s 


354 


48 


13+ 


3d New Hampshire 


Deep Bottom 


Terry s 


198 


28 


14+ 


5th New Hampshire 


Fredericksburg 


Hancock s 


303* 


51 


16+ 


5th New Hampshire 


Gettysburg 


Caldwell s 


177 


34 


19+ 


5th New Hampshire 


Cold Harbor 


Barlow s 


577 


69 


11 + 


6th New Hampshire 


Manassas 


Reno s 


450 


68 


15+ 


7th New Hampshire 


Fort Wagner 


Seymour s 


480 


77 


16 + 


9th New Hampshire 


Spotsylvannia 


Potter s 


502 


68 


13+ 


12th New Hampshire 


Chancellors ville 


Whipple s 


558 


72 


12 + 


12th New Hampshire 


Cold Harbor 


Brooks s 


301 


66 


21 + 


2d New Jersey (5 Cos.) 


Games Mill 


Slocum s 


261 


34 


13+ 


8th New Jersey 


Chancellorsville 


Berry s 


258 


32 


12 + 


llth New Jersey 


Gettysburg 


Humphreys s 


275 


40 


14 + 


14th New Jersey 


Monocacy 


Ricketts s 


350 


40 


11 + 


15th New Jersey f 


Spotsylvania 


Russell s 


432 


116 


26 + 



* In Hancock s official report, the number unsaved is stated at 303 ; but, Colonel Cross in his official report says that lie " took into action 19 
Commissioned Officers and 247 bayonets." 

t Chaplain Haines, in his history of the 15th New Jersey, states that the regiment broke camp the week before, with 16 officers and 429 
muskets. lie gives the uaiues yf the officers, After deducting the slight loss at the Wilderness, there would be 432 left, as present at Spotsyl- 



vaiiia. 



KKUI.MKNTAL I UUCKNTAUKS OF KILLKD IN PAHTICULAK KMJ.UJKMKNTS. 



31 



Jlegimtttt. 

4th New York 
5th New York 
5th New York 
7th New York 
8th New York 
9th New York 

13th New York 

22d New York 

25th New York 

20th New York 

28th New York 

30th New York 

34th New York 

38th New York 

40th New York (5 Cos.) 

40th New York 

42d New York 

44th New York 

48th New York 

49th New York 

49th New York 

:>7th New York 

57th New York 

59th New York 

61st New York 

63d New York 

64th New York 

66th New York 

(57th New York 

69th New York 

69th New York 

70th New York 

71st New York 

73(1 New York 

76th New York 

80th New York 

82d New York 

82d New York 

83d New York 

88th New York 

88th New York 

93d New York 

96th New York 
100th New York 
101st New York 
105th New York 
107th New York 
lllth New York (8 Cos.) 



Rank. 

Aiitietum 

Games Mill 

Manas-sat- 

Fredericksburg 

Cross Keys 

Antietam 

Mnnassas 

Manassas 

Hanover C. H. 

Fredericksburg 

Cedar Mountain 

Manassas 

Antietam 

Fredericksburg 

Fair Oaks 

Manassas 

Antietam 

Malvern Hill 

Foil Wagner 

Wilderness 

Spotsylvania 

Antietam 

Fredericksburg 

Antietam 

Fair Oaks 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Fredericksburg 

Wilderness 

Antietam 

Fredericksburg 

Williamsburg 

Manassas 

Manassas 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Fredericksburg 

Antietam 

Fredericksburg 

Wilderness 

Fort Harrison 

Fort Wagner 

Manassas 

Fredericksburg 

New HOJM; Church 

Gettysburg 



Division. 

French s 

Sykes s 

Sykes s 

Hancock s 

Blenker s 

Rodman s 

Morell s 

Hatch s 

Morell s 

Gibbon s 

VVilliams s 

Hatch s 

Sedgwick s 

Birney s 

Kearny s 

Kearny s 

Sedgwick s 

Morell s 

Seymour s 

Getty s 

Getty s 

Richardson s 

Hancock s 

Sedgwick s 

Richardson s 

Richardson s 

Caldwell s 

Hancock s 

Wright s 

Richardson s 

Hancock s 

Hooker s 

Hooker s 

Hooker s 

Wadsworth s 

Doubleday s 

Sedgwick s 

Gibbon s 

Gibbon s 

Richardson s 

Hancock s 

Birney s 

Stannard s 

Seymour s 

Kearny s 

Giblwm s 

Williams s 

Alex. Hays s 



M&W-J. 


KilUd. 


Per Ct. 


540 


64 


1 + 


450 


55 


2 + 


490 


117 


23+ 


488 


56 


1 + 


548 


63 


1 + 


373 


54 


4 + 


240 


45 


8 + 


379 


4<; 


2 + 


349 


41 


1 + 


300 


51 


7 + 


339 


H 


2 + 


341 


66 


19 + 


311 


41 


13+ 


374 


41 


KI + 


231 


24 


10 + 


244 


37 


15 + 


: ,4: 


58 


115+ 


225 


23 


10 + 


516 


83 


16 + 


384 


39 


10 + 


284 


52 


18+ 


309 


53 


10 + 


192 


20 


10+ 


381 


71 


18+ 


435 


44 


10 + 


341 


59 


17+ 


205 


31 


15 + 


238 


24 


! + 


270 


28 


K> + 


317 


71 


22 + 


238 


: .4 


14 + 


700 


97 


13 + 


250 


37 


14 + 


107 


17 


15+ 


: ,74 


48 


12+ 


287 


47 


6 + 


339 


41 


2 + 


461 


68 


4 + 


292 


35 


1 + 


302 


38 


2 + 


252 


38 


4 + 


433 


72 


<> + 


H ,7 


33 


3+ 


47S 


66 


3 + 


168 


26 


5+ 


177 


22 


2 + 


35S 


47 


13+ 


390 


88 


22+ 



32 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment. 

lllth New York 
114th New York 
114th New York 
121st New York 
121st New York 
124th New York 
124th New York 
126th New York 
134th New York 
137th New York 
141st New York 
147th New York* 

3d Ohio 

4th Ohio 

5th Ohio 

6th Ohio 

7th Ohio 

7th Ohio 

8th Ohio 

Sth Ohio 
10th Ohio 
14th Ohio 
25th Ohio 
38th Ohio 
41st Ohio 
41st Ohio 
40th Ohio 
63d Ohio (9 Cos.) 
65th Ohio 
73d Ohio 
73d Ohio 
82d Ohio 
101st Ohio 
llth Ohio Battery 

Sth Penn. Reserves 

llth Penn. Reserves 

26th Pennsylvania 

45th Pennsylvania 

46th Pennsylvania 

49th Pennsylvania 

52d Pennsylvania 

53d Pennsylvania 

56th Pennsylvania 

58th Pennsylvania 

61st Pennsylvania 

62d Pennsylvania 



Battle. 

Wilderness 

Opequon 

Cedar Creek 

Salem Heights 

Spotsylvaiiia 

Chancellorsville 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Wauhatchie 

Peach Tree Creek 

Gettysburg 

Chaplin Hills 

Fredericksburg 

Cedar Mountain 

Stone s River 

Cedar Mountain 

Ringgold 

Antietam 

Gettysburg 

Chaplin Hills 

Chickamauga 

Gettysburg 

Jonesboro 

Shiloh 

Pickett s Mills 

Pickett s Mills 

Corinth 

Stone s River 

Manassas 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Stone s River 

luka 

Fredericksburg 
Fredericksb urg 
Gettysburg 
Cold Harbor 
Cedar Mountain 
Spotsylvaiiia 
Fair Oaks 
Fredericksburg 
Gettysburg- 
Fort Harrison 
Fair Oaks 
Gettysburg 



Division. 

Barlow s 

Dwight s 

Dwight s 

Brooks s 

Russell s 

Whipple s 

Birney s 

Alex. Hays s 

Steiiiwehr s 

Geary s 

Williams s 

Wadsworth s 

Rousseau s 

French s 

Augur s 

Palmer s 

Augur s 

Geary s 

French s 

Alex. Hays s 

Rousseau s 

Brannan s 

Barlow s 

Baird s 

Nelson s 

T. J. Wood s 

T. J. Wood s 

Stanley s 

T. J. Wood s 

Schenck s 

Steiiiwehr s 

Schurz s 

Davis s 

Hamilton s 

Meade s 

Meade s 

Humphreys s 

Potter s 

Williams s 

Russell s 

Casey s 

Hancock s 

Wadsworth s 

Stannard s 

Couch s 

Barnes s 



Engaged. 


Killed. 


Per Ct. 


386 


59 


15+ 


315 


44 


13+ 


250 


39 


15+ 


453 


97 


21+ 


346 


60 


17+ 


550 


57 


10+ 


238 


32 


13+ 


402 


64 


15 + 


400 


60 


15+ 


206 


31 


15+ 


142 


31 


21 + 


380 


76 


20+ 


502 


64 


12 + 


113 


12 


11 + 


275 


31 


11 + 


383 


51 


13+ 


307 


55 


17 + 


206 


25 


12 + 


341 


43 


12 + 


209 


28 


13+ 


528 


84 


15+ 


449 


81 


18 + 


220 


25 


11 + 


360 


72 


20 + 


371 


43 


11 + 


271 


40 


14+ 


475 


83 


17+ 


275 


39 


14+ 


405 


52 


12 + 


335 


39 


11 + 


300 


40 


13+ 


312 


35 


11 + 


460 


51 


11 + 


105 


19 


18 + 


264 


44 


16+ 


394 


49 


12 + 


382 


65 


17 + 


315 


41 


13 + 


504 


55 


10 + 


478 


109 


22+ 


249 


29 


11 + 


283 


39 


14+ 


252 


31 


12+ 


237 


34 


14+ 


574 


92 


16+ 


426 


45 


10+ 



REGIMENTAL PERCENTAGES OP KILLED IN PARTICULAR ENGAGEMENTS. 



33 



Jtegiment. 


PattU. 


Division. 


Engaged. 


KilltX. 


Per Ct. 


68th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Birney s 


320 


47 


14+ 


69th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Gibbon s 


258 


56 


81+ 


72d Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Gibbon s 


473 


64 


13 + 


75th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Schurz s 


206 


33 


16+ 


81st Pennsylvania 


Fredericksbnrg 


Hancock s 


261 


46 


17 + 


83d Pennsylvania 


Seven Days 


Morell s 


554 


111* 


20 + 


83d Pennsylvania 


Manassas 


Morell s 


224 


26 


10+ 


84th Pennsylvania 


Kernstown 


Shield s 


260 


30 


11 + 


97th Pennsylvania 


Bermuda Hundred 


Ames s 


311 


56 


18+ 


105th Pennsylvania 


Wilderness 


Birney s 


351 


56 


15 + 


107th Pennsylvania 


Antietam 


Kicketts s 


190 


27 


14 + 


lllth Pennsylvania 


Antietam 


Greene s 


243 


33 


13+ 


115th Pennsylvania 


Chancellors ville 


Berry s 


244 


25 


10+ 


116th Pennsylvania 


Fredericksbnrg 


Hancock s 


247 


25 


10+ 


118th Pennsylvania 


Shepherdstown 


Morell s 


737 


78 


10 + 


121st Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Doubleday s 


263 


29 


11 + 


132d Pennsylvania 


Fredericksburg 


French s 


251 


26 


10+ 


140th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Caldwell s 


589 


61 


10+ 


141st Pennsylvania 


Chancellorsville 


Birney s 


417 


62 


14 + 


141st Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Birney s 


198 


49 


24 + 


142d Pennsylvania 


Fredericksburg 


Meade s 


550 


66 


12 + 


145th Pennsylvania 


Fi edericksburg 


Hancock s 


505 


91 


18 + 


145th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Caldwell s 


202 


27 


13+ 


148th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Caldwell s 


210 


31 


14 + 


149th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Doubleday s 


450 


67 


14 + 


150th Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Doubleday s 


400 


57 


14 + 


151st Pennsylvania 


Gettysburg 


Doubleday s 


467 


66 


14 + 


2d Vermont 


Wilderness 


Getty s 


700 


80 


11 + 


3d Vermont (4 Cos.) 


Lee s Mills 


W. F. Smith s 


192 


35 


18 + 


3d Vermont 


Wilderness 


Getty s 


:,:::< 


68 


12+ 


3d Vermont 


Cold Harbor 


Getty s 


293 


30 


10 + 


4th Vermont 


Wilderness 


Getty s 


575 


84 


14 + 


5th Vermont 


Savage Station 


W. F. Smith s 


400 


72 


18 + 


5th Vermont 


Wilderness 


Getty s 


475 


63 


13 + 


6th Vermont 


Wilderness 


Getty s 


441 


69 


15 f 


8th Vermont 


Cedar Creek 


Dwight s 


156 


26 


16+ 


10th Vermont 


Cedar Creek 


Kicketts s 


277 


27 


10 + 


1st Wisconsin 


Chaplin Hills 


Rousseau s 


407 


77 


18+ 


2d Wisconsin 


Manassas 


Hatch s 


511 


87 


17 + 


2d Wisconsin 


Gettysburg 


Wadsworth s 


302 


46 


15 + 


3d Wisconsin 


Antietam 


Williams s 


340 


41 


12+ 


4th Wisconsin 


Port Hudson 


Pai ne s 


222 


45 


20+ 


10th Wisconsin 


Chaplin Hills 


Rousseau s 


376 


52 


13+ 


14th Wisconsin 


Vicksburg(May22) 


Me Art bur s 


256 


30 


11 + 


15th Wisconsin 


Dallas 


T. J. Wood s 


160 


26 


16+ 



Of this number, Cl were killed or mortally wounded at Galucb Mill ; the remaining 50 were lost at Malvern HilL 

3 



34 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Regiment. 

19th Wisconsin 
26th Wisconsin 
26th Wisconsin 
36th Wisconsin (4 Cos.) 
37th Wisconsin 

7th U. S. Infantry 
10th U. S. Infantry 
llth U. S. Infantry 
17th U. S. Infantry 
18th U. S. Infantry 

5th U. S. Colored 

6th U. S. Colored 

79th U. S. Colored 



Battle. 

Fair Oaks (1864) 
Chancellorsville 
Gettysburg 
Bethesda Church 
Petersburg Mine 

Gettysburg 
Gettysburg 
Gettysburg 
Gettysburg 
Stone s River 

Chaffin s Farm 
Chaffin s Farm 
Poison Springs 



Division. 

Marston s 

Schurz s 

Schurz s 

Gibbon s 

Willcox s 

Barnes s 
Barnes s 
Barnes s 
Barnes s 
Rousseau s 

Paine s 
Paine s 
Thayer s 



Engaged. 

197 
471 

508 
240 
251 

116 
93 

286 
260 
603 

550 
367 
463 



Killed. 
26 

53 
61 
49 
55 

19 

22 

35 

43 

102 

85 

61 

111 



Per Ct. 
13+ 

11 + 

12 + 

20+ 
21 + 

16+ 
23+ 
12+ 
16+ 
16+ 

15+ 

16+ 
23+ 



Unlike other tabulations in these pages, the above list is not an exhaustive one. Although 
showing losses of over ten per cent., it does not include every loss which exceeded that ratio. 
It is impossible, in many cases, to ascertain the number of muskets taken into action ; regi 
mental commandants seldom stated it, although it always would have formed an important 
item in their official report. 

Morning reports are of little assistance in this matter, for there w r as always a wide 
difference between the number of men reported as " present for duty " and the number taken 
into action. Although the morning reports stated the " present for duty" separately from the 
"aggregate present," there were still a large number of non-combatants included in the 
"present for duty"; a large number of men detailed on special duties too often, contrary 
to orders ; and in case of a hard march, immediately preceding a battle, many fell out from 
inability to keep up, to say nothing of disinclination. General McClellan, in his official 
report of the battle of Antietam, carelessly states the strength of his army at 87,164, when it 
is doubtful if he had 60,000 muskets on the field." Yet the morning reports would justify 
his statement. 

Let it be hoped that, in the future wars of the Republic, the army may have its corps of 
intendants, as in the German Army ; that every wearer of the national uniform shall be a 
man-at-arms, serving as such only ; and that the men attached to the trains and all other 
subsidiary departments shall be enlisted for such service and wear a different uniform. Then 
a morning report will be some indication of the strength of a regiment or of an army. 

The Confederates managed these things better. They counted their men as they went 
into action, and were careful to report no larger number. They were quick to see the 
important point involved. In General Cheatham s official report for Stone s River, he not 
only tabulates the number of killed and wounded in his division, but adds other columns in 
which he states the number of men taken into action by each regiment and the consequent 
percentage of loss. 

This mention of the actual force engaged is a frequent item in the reports of the Confed 
erate colonels, while in the Union A.rmy it is correspondingly rare. In the latter there were 
so many men detailed contrary to order officers servants, for instance that, too often, a 
colonel did not care to call attention to the discrepancy between his morning report and his 



* Gen. F. W. Palfrey : The Antietam and Fredericksburg, p. 70. 



HANCOCK S DIVISION. 

effective strength. The Union Armies generally outnumbered the Con f ederates, but the 
disparity was not so great as the official figures always implied. 

Although the reports of the Union commanders seldom mentioned the number taken into 
action by each regiment, General Hancock was thoughtful enough in his re|K>rt for Freder- 
icksburg to specify the number present on the field in each regiment of his division. As the 
loss in Hancock s Division, in its memorable assault on Marye s Heights, was one of the 
severest of the war, it is given here in full. In addition to the official figures, the number of 
killed, as increased by those who died of their wounds, is also given the number having 
been ascertained by examining the muster-out rolls of each regiment. 

Having the exact number engaged, these casualties are of interest as showing the outside 
limit of loss to which troops are subjected in action. There are on record some higher per 
centages in cases of individual regiments in certain engagements, but no greater percentage 
in any division. 

HANCOCK S DIVISION. 
FREDERICKSBURO, DF.C. 13, 1S62. 



If KOI MB NT*. 


Casualties. 


Nnmlwr 
Kneaded. 


I eroentaRe 
of 
Casualties. 


Killed HIM) 
Died of 

\Viimnls. 


PWii litiijci* 
Killed. 


Killed. 


Wounded. 


Missing. 


Toiul. 


Caldwcll s Brigade. 
Staff 


20 
26 
9 
4 
15 
34 

14 
2 
10 

17 

m 

i 

10 

4 
6 
8 
11 
21 
1 


3 
154 
184 
27 
68 
141 
152 

124 
38 
95 
97 
67 

S3 
41 
37 
78 
55 
133 
4 


r. 

33 

20 
43 

20 
4 
23 
13 
14 

20 
9 

1 
9 
1 

229 


3 
193 

243 
36) 

72 f 
176 
229 

158 
44 

128 
127 

88 

113 

54 
43 

87 
75 
155 

y 

2,029 


303 

488 

435 

261 
500 

416 
162 

238 
252 
247 

3*4 
244 
160 
192 
238 
314 

4,834 


63.6 
4V). 7 

24.8 

07.4 
45. s 

37.9 

27. 1 
53. 7 
50.3 
35.6 

20.4 
22. 1 
26. S 
45.3 
31.5 
49.3 

41.9 


51 
56 

26 

46 
91 

OT 

3, 
11 
34 
38 
25 

36 

15 
12 
20 
24 
39 


16.8 
11.4 

5.9 

17.6 
lb.2 

8.8 
6.7 
14.2 
15.0 

lo.l 

9.3 
6.1 
7.5 
10.4 
10.0 
12.4 


5th New Hampshire . 
7th New York. 


61st New York 


61th New York 


81st Pennsvlvania. 


145th Pennsylvania 


Irish Brigade. 
28th Massachusetts .. 


63d New York 


69th New York . 


88th New York 


116th Pennsylvania 


w 

Zook s Brigade. 
27th Connecticut 


2d Delaware 


52d New York 


57th New York 


66th New York 


53d Pennsylvania 


4th U.S. Artillery "C" 


Total 


219 


1,581 


561 


11.6 





Nearly all the missing ones were killed or wounded men, who M\ in front of the 
wall at Marye s Heights. Most of them belong with the killed, and were buried by the 
enemy. The number engaged may appear small ; but it should IK- remembered that this 
division had already lost 3,290 men on the Peninsula and at Antietam. 



36 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



It may be of interest to know the maximum of percentage, as based on the total of 
killed, ivounded and missing, instead of on the killed and mortally wounded alone. Such 
percentages, however, are apt to be unsatisfactory, as the missing includes the captured men. 
In the following table the missing are mostly, if not all, killed or wounded men. 



MAXIMUM PERCENTAGE OF CASUALTIES. 



Regiment. 

1st Minnesota 
141st Pennsylvania 
101st New York 
25th Massachusetts 
36th Wisconsin (4 Cos.) 
20th Massachusetts 

8th Vermont 
81st Pennsylvania 
12th Massachusetts 

1st Maine H. A. 

9th Louisiana Colored 
lllth New York 
24th Michigan 

5th New Hampshire 

9th Illinois 

9th New York (8 Cos.) 
15th New Jersey 
15th Massachusetts 
69th New York 
51st Illinois 
19th Indiana 
121st New York 

5th New York 
93d New York 

2d Wisconsin 
41st Illinois 
148th Pennsylvania 
15th Indiana 

7th Ohio 
80th New York 
63d New York 

3d Wisconsin 
114th New York 
59th New York 
26th Ohio 

2d Wisconsin 

3d Maine 

17th U. S. Inf. (7 Cos.) 
126th New York 
45th Pennsylvania 



Battle. 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Manassas 

Cold Harbor 

Bethesda Church 

Fredericksburg 

Cedar Creek 

Fredericksburg 

Antietam 

Petersburg 

Milliken s Bend 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Fredericksburg 

Shiloh 

Antietam 

Spotsylvania 

Gettysburg 

Antietam 

Chickamauga 

Manassas 

Salem Church 

Manassas 

Wilderness 

Gettysburg 

Jackson 

Gettysburg 



Corps. 

Second 

Third 

Third 

Eighteenth 

Second 

Second 

Nineteenth 

Second 

First 

Second 



Engaged. Killed. * Wounded. Missing. 



Second 

First 

Second 

Ninth 

Sixth 

Second 

Second 

Twentieth 

First 

Sixth 

Fifth 

Second 

First 

Sixteenth 



Second 
Missionary Ridge Fourth 
Cedar Mountain Twelfth 



Gettysburg 

Antietam 

Antietam 

Opequon 

Antietam 

Chickamauga 

Manassas 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Cold Harbor 



First 

Second 

Twelfth 

Nineteenth 

Second 

Twenty-first 

First 

Third 

Fifth 

Second 

Ninth 



262f 

198 

168 

310 

240 

238 

156 

261 

334 

950 

300 

390 

496 

303 

578 

373 

432 

239 

317 

209 

423 

453 

490 

433 

302 

338 

210 

334 

307 

287 

341 

340 

315 

381 

362 

511 

210 

260 

402 

315 



47 

25 

6 

53 

20 
25 
17 
15 
49 
115 
62 
58 
69 
20 
61 
45 
75 
23 
44 
18 
47 
48 
79 
42 
26 
27 
19 
24 
31 
35 
35 
27 
21 
48 
27 
53 
18 
25 
40 
18 



168 
103 
101 
139 
108 
138 

66 
141 
165 
489 
130 
177 
247 
154 
300 
176 
159 

97 
152 

92 
168 
173 
170 
213 
155 
135 
101 
175 
149 
111 
165 
173 
164 
153 
140 
213 

59 
118 
181 
141 



21 
17 

28 
38 

23 

20 
10 

28 

14 

t 

19 

5 

14 
38 

28 

18 
44 

55 

48 

5 

40 
5 

2 
24 

9, 



23 
45 
32 
45 

7 
10 

22 



Per Ct. 

82.0 

75.7 

73.8 

70.0 

69.0 

68.4 

67.9 

67.4 

67.0 

66.5 

64.0 

63.8 

63.7 

63.6 

63.3 

63.0 

62.9 

61.9 

61.8 

61.2 

61.2 

60.9 

60.6 

60.0 

59.9 

59.7 

59.5 

59.5 

59.2 

59.2 

59.2 

58.8 

58.7 

58.7 

58.5 

58.3 

58.0 

57. 6 

57.4 

57.4 



Including the mortally wounded. tAction of July ad-8 companies engaged ; total casualties at Gettysburg were 224 

i and wounded there were 47 missing In addition to the killed and wounded there were 52 missing. 



MAXIMUM PKRCENT.UJE OF CASUALTIES. 



37 



Regiment. 

49th Pennsylvania 

Oth U. S. Colored 
15th Massachusetts 
20th New York 
14th Indiana 
90th Illinois 
26th Pennsylvania 
llth New Jersey 

1st Michigan 
19th Indiana 
12th New Hampshire 
Olst Pennsylvania 
25th Illinois 
14th Ohio 

2d New Hampshire 

sth Kansas 
10th Maine 
I Oth United States 
55th Illinois 
09th New York 
35th Illinois 
22d Indiana 
llth Illinois 



Battle. 

Spotsylvania 

Chaftin s Farm 

Antietam 

Fredericksbuig 

Antietam 

Chickamauga 

Gettysburg 

( it-ii \ -inn- 

Manassas 

Gettysburg 

Cold Harbor 

Fair Oaks 

Chickamauga 

Chickamauga 

Gettysburg 

Chickamauga 

Fredericksbuig 

Stone s River 

Shiloh 

Fredericksburg 

Chickamauga 

Chaplin Hills 



Corps. 

Sixth 


Engaged. 

47S 


Killed. */ 
50 


/ ounJed. 

ISO 


Misting. 

44 


Eighteenth 


307 


11 


100 


8 


Second 


000 


65 


255 


24 


First 


300 


23 


130 


11 


Second 


320 


30 


150 




Reserve 


401 


39 


134 


52 


Third 


382 


30 


176 


7 


Third 


275 


17 


124 


12 


Fifth 


320 


33 


114 


31 


First 


2S8 


27 


I:;:; 


t 


Eighteenth 


301 


23 


129 


15 


Fourth 


574 


68 


152 


43 


Twentieth 


337 


10 


171 


24 


Fourteenth 


449 


35 


107 


43 


Third 


354 


20 


137 


36 


Twentieth 


4<)0 


30 


165 


25 


First 


427 


27 


170 


34 


Fourteenth 


308 


10 


134 


16 




512 


51 


197 


27 


Second 


238 


10 


95 


23 


Twentieth 


299 


17 


130 


13 


Fourteenth 


303 


49 


87 


23 




500 


70 


isl 


i 



I rr Ct. 
57.3 

56.9 
56.7 
56.6 
56.2 
56.1 
55.7 
55.6 
55.6 
55.5 
55.4 
55.4 
54.9 
54.5 
54.5 
54.1 
54.0 
53.8 
53.7 
53.7 
53.5 
52.4 
50.1 



Fort Donelson 

There are other instances which deserve a place in tin- pivrrdiug list, hut are omitted ;i- 
it is impossible to ascertain definitely the number of men engaged. 

It is well to pause here, and consider \vhat these figures mean ; to think of what such 
extraordinary percentages imply. Perhaps their significance will l>e better understood when 
compared with some extraordinary loss in foreign wars; some well known instance which 
may serve as a standard of measurement. Take the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava. 
Its extraordinary loss has been made a familiar feature of heroic verse and story in every land, 
until the whole world has heard of the gallant Six Hundred and their ride into the Valley of 
Death. Now, as the Light Brigade accomplished nothing in this action, merely executed 
an order which was a blunder, it must be that it was the danger and its attendant loss which 
inspired the interest in that historic ride. What was the loss ? The Light Brigade took 673 
officers and men into that charge ; they lost 113 killed and 134 wounded ; total, 247, or 30.7 
per cent. 

The heaviest loss in the German Army during the Franco-Prussian war occurred in the 
Sixteenth Infantry (Third Westphalian), at Mars La Tour. Like all German regiments of the 
line it numbered 3,000 men. As this battle was the first in which it was engaged, occurring 
within a few days of the opening of the campaign, it carried 3,000 men into action. It lost 
509 killed and mortally wounded, 019 wounded, and 305 missing !; total. 1484, or 49.4 per 
cent. The Garde-Schutzen Battalion, 1,000 strong, lost at Metz, August 18th. 162 killed and 
mortally wounded, 294 wounded, and 5 missing; total, 401, or 40. 1 per cent. 

A comparison of these percentages with those of the Union regiments in certain battles 
just cited will give some idea of the desperate character of the fighting during the American 
Civil War. 



Including the mortally wounded. + In addition to the killed and wound* 

Jin ji lcUti.ui to the killed and wounded th.>n> wero RS raiMtaff. 

(Dr. Engel: Director des knniglich preussis:hn statistisohen Bureaus. 






CHAPTER IV. 



LOSS IN OFFICERS -- LIST OF GENERALS KILLED SURGEONS AND 

CHAPLAINS KILLED. 

"pHE loss in officers killed or wounded, in proportion to their number, was in excess of 
that of their men. Of the total number killed and wounded during the war, there were 
6,365 officers, and 103,705 enlisted men ; or, one officer to 16 men. In the common regi 
mental organization there was one officer to 28 men ; and this proportion would have conse 
quently required only one officer to 28 men among the killed. The loss of officers, however, 
was not so excessive as the difference in these ratios would indicate ; for, as the ranks 
became depleted the latter proportion was not maintained. In the Army of the Potomac, 
just before starting on the Wilderness campaign, the morning reports showed one officer to 
every 21 men "present for duty, equipped." As this latter proportion was a frequent one,* 
it may be assumed that the difference between it and the actual ratio in the killed indicates 
fairly the excess of the loss in officers. 

At Gettysburg, the officers lost 27 per cent, in killed and wounded, while the enlisted men 
lost 21 per cent., as based on the number engaged. At Shiloh, the loss in officers killed 
and wounded was 21.3 per cent., and in men 17.9 per cent., as based on the morning 
reports of Grant s six divisions. 

This greater loss among the officers did not occur because they were so much braver than 
the men in the ranks, but because the duties of their position while under fire involved a 
greater personal exposure. Sharpshooters were always on the alert to pick them off ; and, 
even in the confusion of a hot musketry fire, any soldier, 110 matter how poor a marksman, 
would turn his rifle on any conspicuous man in the opposing ranks whose appearance indicated 
that he might be an officer. In close quarters, guns were not apt to be aimed at privates if a 
Lieutenant was in sight near by. There was just as good stuff in the ranks as in the line ; 
in fact, the line officers were recruited almost entirely from the ranks ; but when the 
gallant private donned an officer s uniform, he found his chances not at all improved, to 
say the least. 

This additional exposure is well illustrated by a comparison of the casualties at Gettys 
burg with those of the Wilderness. In the first named battle the percentage of loss among 
the officers was one-half greater than in the latter. At Gettysburg, the fighting w^as done 
in open fields, where the officers were in full view ; at the Wilderness, the fighting was 
done in dense thickets which concealed the opposing armies. In the latter, both officers 
and men were hidden by the leafy screens, and hence their casualty lists show a like per 
centage of loss. 

In the Franco-Prussian war there was a remarkable excess of loss among the German 
officers. The percentages of killed and mortally wounded in the entire German army were : 
Enlisted men, 3.1 ; Line officers, 8.0 ; Staff officers, 9.6. 

* Exactly the same proportion one officer to 21 men of the " present for duty, equipped " appears in the morning reports of Gen. Grant s 
army at Shiloh ; of the Peninsular Army in the Seven Days Battle ; of Sherman s armies in the Atlanta campaign ; and in several other 
instances. The variations, in general, were few and slight. 

(38) 



MAXIMUM <n OKKICKKS KILLED. 3!) 

The largest numl>er of officers killed in any infantry regiment in tho Union Annies is 
found in the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, of tho Sixth Corps, in which in officers were killed or 
mortally wounded during the war. Among the numl>er were three colonels : Col. Rippey 
was killed at Fair Oaks ; Col. Spear fell while leading a successful assault on Marye s Heights; 
and Col. Crosby, who had lost an arm at Fort Stevens, was killed in the final and victorious 
assault on Petersburg. The total loss of the Sixty-first in killed and died of wounds, was 1! 
officers and 218 enlisted men ; total, 237. It was a gallant regiment and was bravely led, as 
its loss in officers clearly shows. 

The following list embraces every regiment which lost 16 or more officers killed during 
the war : 

INFANTRY. 

OMeert 

ftegiment. Division. Corps. A illsJ. 

61st Pennsylvania Getty s . Sixth 19 

5th New Hampshire Barlow s Second. 18 

12th Massachusetts Robinson s First. 18 

48th New York . Terry s Tenth 18 

73d New York . Hooker s Third 18 

81st Pennsylvania Barlow s Second 18 

145th Pennsylvania Barlow s Second 18 

31st Maine . Potter s Ninth 18 

20th Massachusetts Gibbon s Second. 17 

14th Connecticut Gibbon s Second. 17 

62d Pennsylvania Griffin s. Fifth . 17 

63d Pennsylvania Birney s Third 17 

5th Michigan ... Birney s Third 1> 

ICth Massachusetts Humphreys s Third H , 

61st New York . Barlow s Second . h> 

126th New York . Barlow s Second ItJ 

82d Ohio Schurz s . Eleventh. 1C 

100th Pennsylvania Stevenson s . Ninth. 16 

r.th Wisconsin AVadswi >rth s . First 16 

HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

1st Maine . Birney f Second . 

Sth New York. Gibbon s Second. 

A heavy artillery regiment had just twice as many line officers as an infantry regiment. 

The largest regimental loss of officers killed in any one battle, occurred in the Seventh 
New Hampshire at the assault on Fort Wagner, the regiment losing 1 1 officers 
mortally wounded in that bloody affair. Among the killed was Col. Putnam, who fell i 
he had gained an entrance within the outer works of the fort. He was a graduate of Wes 
Point and an officer of the Regular Army ; like many other Regular officers he had received 
permission to accept the command of a volunteer regiment. 

The Twenty-second New York Infantry lost at Manassas 10 officers 
out of 24 present in action ; 9 of them were killed, among whom was the Lieutenant-Colonel, 

Gorton T. Thomas. 

The following list includes every infantry regiment in the service which lo> 

officers killed in any one engagement : 



40 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Officers 
Regiment. Battle. Division. Corps. Killed. 

7th New Hampshire Fort Wagner Seymour s Tenth 11 

7th New York Fredericksburg Hancock s Second 9 

22d New York Manassas Hatch s First 9 

59th New York Antietam Sedgwick s Second 9 

145th Pennsylvania Fredericksburg Hancock s Second 9 

43d Illinois Shiloh McClernand s 8 

87th Indiana Chickamauga Brannan s Fourteenth 8 

1st Michigan Manassas MorelPs Fifth 8 

14th New Hampshire Opequon Grover s Nineteenth 8 

24th Michigan Gettysburg Wadsworth s First 8 

120th New York Gettysburg Humphreys s Third 8 

In addition, mention should be made of the loss of officers in the heavy artillery at 
certain battles. The First Maine H. A. lost 12 officers, killed or wounded, at Spotsylvania, 
May 19th, of whom were killed or mortally wounded ; and at Petersburg, June 18th, the 
same regiment lost 32 officers, killed or wounded, of whom 10 lost their lives. In the Eighth 
New York Heavy Artillery, t) officers were killed at Cold Harbor. But the large number of 
extra officers allowed these regiments will not admit of their classification with the infantry 
regiments just mentioned. 

There is a remarkable difference between the loss of officers in battle and by disease, as 
compared with that of the enlisted men. In battle, one officer was killed for every 16 enlisted 
men ; but, among the deaths from disease, one officer died to every 72 men, and in the colored 
regiments, one officer to every 215 men. The officers had better facilities for purchasing food, 
and were furnished with better quarters while in camp ; but in an active campaign, in bivouac 
or on the march, they encountered substantially the same exposure and privation ; they were 
exposed to the same storms and their food was equally scanty. There was not enough of 
difference in the fare to account for this remarkable difference in the death-rate. It might 
account for some of it, but for the greater part the reason must be looked for elsewhere. 

The general officers never hesitated in time of battle to share the danger with the men 
whenever it became necessary. The gallantry with which they were wont to expose them 
selves is fully evidenced by the long list of those who were killed. 

GENERAL OFFICERS KILLED IN ACTION. 

ARMY COMMANDERS. 
Major-General James B. McPherson, Army of Tennessee, Killed at Atlanta. 

CORPS COMMANDERS. 

Major-General Joseph K. Mansfield, 12th A. C., Killed at Antietam. 

Major-General John F. Reynolds, 1st A. C., Gettysburg. 

Major-General John Sedgwick, (ith A. C., Spotsylvania. 

DIVISION COMMANDERS. 

Major-General Isaac I. Stevens . _ Killed at Chantilly. 
Major-General Philip Kearny Chantilly. 

Major-General Jesse L. Reno . South Mountain. 

Major-General Israel B. Richardson* Antietam. 

Major-General Amiel W. Whipple* Chancellors ville. 



: Mortally wounded. 



GENERAL OFFICERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



41 



Major-General Hiram G. Berry Killed at Chancellorsville. 

Brevet Major-General James S. Wadsworth Wilderness. 

Brevet Major-General David A. Russell. Opequon. 

Brigadier-General William H. Wallace* . Shiloh. 

Brigadier-General Thomas Williams . Baton Rouge. 

Brigadier-General James S. Jackson. Chaplin Hills. 

Brigadier-General Isaac P. Rodman* Antietam. 

Brigadier-General Thomas G. Stevenson. Spotsylvania. 

Brevet Brigadier-General James A. Mulligan* Winchester (1803) 

BRIGADE COMMANDERS. 

Major-Goneral George C. Strong* .Killed at Fort Wagner. 

Brevet Major-General Alexander Haysf . Wilderness. 

Brevet Major-General S. K. Zook . Gettysburg. 

Brevet Major-General Frederick Winthrop Five Forks. 

Brevet Major-General Thomas A. Smyth* Farmville. 

Brigadier-General Nathaniel Lyon Wilson s Creek. 

Brigadier-General Robert L. McCook^:. Decherd, Tenn. 

Brigadier-General Henry Bohlen . Freeman s Ford. 

Brigadier-General George W. Taylor . Manassas. 

Brigadier-General William R. Ten-ill . Chaplin Hills. 

Brigadier-General Pleasant A. Hackleman Corinth. 

Brigadier-General George J). Bayard* Fredericksburg. 

Brigadier-General Conrad F. Jackson Fredericksburg. 

Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill Stone s River. 

Brigadier-General Edward P. Chapin . Port Hudson. 

Brigadier-General Stephen W. Weed. Gettysburg. 

Brigadier-General Elon J. Farnsworth. Gettysburg. 

Brigadier-General Strong Vincent . Gettysburg. 

Brigadier-General William H. Lytle. Chickamauga. 

Brigadier-General William P. Sanders. Knoxville. 

Brigadier-General Samuel A. Rice* Jenkins Ferry. 

Brigadier-General James C. Rice. Spotsylvania. 

Brigadier-General Charles G. Harker. Kenesaw Mountain. 

Brigadier-General Daniel McCook* Kenesaw Mountain. 

Brigadier-General Hiram Burnhai 1 1 Fort Harrison . 

Brigadier-General Daniel D. Bid well. Cedar Creek. 

Brigadier-General Charles R. Lowell" Cedar Creeli 

Brevet Brigadier-General Arthur H. Dutton* Bermuda Hundred. 

Brevet Brigadier-General Griffin A. Stedman . Petersburg. 

Brevet Brigadier-General George D. Wells. Cedar Creeli 

Brevet Brigadier-General J. H. Kitching* Cedar Creek. 

Brevet Brigadier-General Sylvester G. Hill . Nashville. 

There were also 23 Brevet Brigadier-Generals who were killed in action, but who wen? 
without brigade commands. They were regimental or staff officers whose brevets, in mosl 
instances, dated from the day they were killed. 

Mortally wounded. t Hays commanded a dlvtolon on the Gettysburg oamiwlgn. J Shot by guerrilla*. whll lyln* l<* In an ambulan. 



42 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

There were 35 general officers who died of disease during the war. Among them were 
several prominent and able officers Generals Sumner, C. F. Smith, Birney, Mitchel, Welsh, 
Buford, Corcoran, Ransom, Crocker, and other noted generals. 

A large number of brigades were commanded by Colonels, some of whom held a brigade 
command for a long time, during which they displayed marked ability, but without any 
recognition of their services on the part of the Government. -" The list of Brigadiers killed in 
action would convey an erroneous impression as to the losses in that grade, unless accom 
panied by a supplementary list of the other brigade commanders who also lost their lives 
in battle. 

The following list is composed of Colonels who had been entrusted with brigades, and 
were exercising such commands at the time of their death. They were men of noble spirits, 
intrepid soldiers, whose gallantry and ability had won the admiration and respect of all. 

KILLED IN ACTION. 



BRIGADE COMMANDERS, WITH RANK OF COLONEL. 



Colonel Edward D. Baker, 
Colonel Julius Raith,f 
Colonel Everett Peabody, 
Colonel George Webster, 
Colonel John A. Koltes, 
Colonel William B. Goodrich, 
Colonel George W. Roberts, 
Colonel Frederick Schaefer, 
Colonel George C. Spear, 
Colonel David S. Cowles, 
Colonel George B. Boomer, 
Colonel Edward E. Cross, 
Colonel George L. Willard, 
Colonel Eliakim Sherrill, 
Colonel Haldinand S. Putnam, 
Colonel James E. Mallon, 
Colonel Edward A. King, 
Colonel Hans C. Heg, 
Colonel Philemon P. Baldwin, 
Colonel William R. Creighton, 
Colonel Patrick E. Burke, f 
Colonel Orlando H. Morris, 
Colonel Lewis 0. Morris, 
Colonel Henry Boyd McKeen, 
Colonel Frank A. Haskell, 
Colonel Jeremiah C. Drake, 
Colonel Richard Byrnes, f 
Colonel Patrick Kelly, 
Colonel William Blaisdell, 
Colonel Simon Mix, 



71st 

43d 

25th 

98th 

73d 

60th 

42d 

2d 
61st 
128th 
26th 

5th 
125th 
126th 

7th 
42d 
68th 
15th 

6th 

7th 
66th 
66th 

7th 
81st 
36th 
112th 
28th 
88th 
llth 

3d 



Pennsylvania, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Ohio, 

Pennsylvania, 

New York, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Pennsylvania, 

New York, 

Missouri, 

New Hampshire, 

New York, 

New York, 

New Hampshire, 

New York, 

Indiana, 

Wisconsin, 

Indiana, 

Ohio, 

Illinois, 

New York, 

New York (H. A.), 

Pennsylvania, 

Wisconsin, 

New York, 

Massachusetts, ^ 

New York,:}: 

Massachusetts, 

New York Cavalry, 



BaU s Bluff. 

Shiloh. 

Shiloh. 

Chaplin Hills. 

Manassas. 

Antietam. 

Stone s River. 

Stone s River. 

Marye s Heights. 

Port Hudson. 

Vicksburg. 

Gettysburg. 

Gettysburg. 

Gettysburg. 

Fort Wagner. 

Bristoe Station. 

Chickamauga. 

Chickamauga. 

Chickamauga. 

Ringgold. 

Rome Cross Roads. 

Cold Harbor. 

Cold Harbor. 

Cold Harbor. 

Cold Harbor. 

Cold Harbor. 

Cold Harbor. 

Petersburg. 

Petersburg. 

Petersburg. 



* In the Confederate Army, each brigade commandant was commissioned as a Brigadier-General, except where the appointment was a 
temporary one. t Mortally wounded. J Irish Brigade. 



CHAPLAINS, QUAKTKKMASTKKS, AND SURGEONS. 



Colonel Calvin A. Craig, 
Colonel Nathan T. Dushane, 
Colonel Joseph Tholmrn,* 
Colonel Louis Bell, 



105th Pennsylvania, 
1st Maryland, 
1st West Virginia, 
4th New Hampshire, 



Deep Bottom. 
Weldon Ixailroad. 
Cedar Creek. 
Fort Fisher. 



In each regiment there were officers whose duties did not require that they should go 
into action-- the Chaplain, the Quartermaster, and the Surgeons. Although they had no 
tactical position in the line of battle, there was a loss of life among their numlx-i- which 
entitles them to some other place in the records of the war than that of mere non-combatants. 
Many of them waived their exemption from danger, and gallantly volunteered for service in 
the field ; while others --the surgeons, for instance attended calmly to the performance of 
their duties amid perils which would test the stoutest heart. 

Though the surgeons seldom took an active part in a battle, they were required to l>e 
near, and much of the time were under fire. Some of them went on the field with their regi 
ments in order to render timely aid; others were stationed near by at some field hospital, 
where they often found themselves exposed to serious danger. During the war, 40 Surgeons 
were killed and 73 wounded while bravely attending to their duties on the battle field. They 
had not the excitement of the fight to dull their sense of danger ; they had not the incentive 
of promotion ; they were not spurred by ambitious hopes ; victory might bring laurels to 
others, but not to them ; they met their fate, actuated and sustained by no other impulse 
than the sense of duty. 

Many Surgeons died from disease while in the service, and their names also lengthen the 
Roll of Honor. A record of these patriots, their names and regiments, and the battles in 
which they lost their lives, appears in the Medical and Surgical History of the war. 

Several lives were also lost among the Quartermasters, some of them having been killed 
while serving as volunteer aids, while others fell while attending to the duties of their 
position when under fire. Among the first to scale the heights of Missionary Ridge was a 
Quartermaster-Sergeant of a Michigan regiment, who had borrowed a gun and volunteered 
for the fight. 

It will, doubtless, be a surprise to many to note the number of Chaplains killed in battle 1 . 
These gallant members of the Church Militant were wont to take a more active part in the 
fighting than has been generally credited to them. They were frequently seen in the thickest 
of the fight, some of them handling a rifle with the skill of a marksman, while others, 
unarmed, would move about among their men encouraging them to do their best. 

Among the Chaplains killed in action, there were : 



Name. 

Rev. Arthur B. Fuller, 
Rev. Orlando N. Benton, 
Rev. John M. Springer, 
Rev. Francis E. Butler, 
Rev. John L. Walther, 
Rev. Levi W. Sanders, 
Rev. John W. Eddy, 
Rev. Horatio S. Howell, 
Rev. Thomas L. Ambrose, 
Rev. George W. Bartlett, 
Rev. George W. Densmore, 



Regiment. 

Massachusetts, 
51st New York, 
3d Wisconsin, 
25th New Jersey, 
43d Illinois, 
125th Illinois, 
72d Indiana, 
90th Pennsylvania, 
12th New Hampshire, 
1st Maine Cavalry, 
1st Wisconsin Cavalry, 



Battle. 

Fredericksburg. 

New Berne. 

liVsaca. 

Siege of Suffolk. 

Shiloh. 

Cald well s Ferry. 

Hoover s Gap. 

Gettysburg. 

Petersburg. 

Cold Harbor. 

L Anguille Ferry 



Thoburn commanded a division durinc the entire Shenandoah campaign, and wax In command of it at tlio time of lil-i death. 



44 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

In addition, there were several who lost their lives by the diseases incident to the hard 
ship and exposure of a soldier s life. 

Chaplain Fuller, of the Sixteenth Massachusetts, had resigned from the service and had 
just received his discharge, when he learned that his regiment was about to go into action, at 
Fredericksburg. Crossing the river in the boats with the forlorn hope, he joined the skir 
mishers of the Nineteenth Massachusetts, who were then fighting their way through the 
streets. He fell dead, rifle in hand, in front of a grocery store on Caroline Street. 

Springer, of the Third Wisconsin, fell mortally wounded at Resaca, after having "seized 
a musket " and fought for four hours in the " hottest of the fight." 

Howell, of the Ninetieth Pennsylvania, was shot at Gettysburg during the retreat through 
the town, and died on the steps of a church. 

Butler was killed at the Siege of Suffolk, while carrying water to some wounded men. 

Bartlett, of the First Maine Cavalry, was killed at Cold Harbor. He was struck in the 
breast by a shell and " literally blown to pieces." 

Benton fell at New Berne, and General Reno states in his official report that he "was 
killed while nobly encouraging the men to do their duty." 

Eddy, of the Seventy-second Indiana, fell at Hoover s Gap, Tenn., struck by a cannon ball. 

Of Chaplain Ambrose, who was killed in the trenches at Petersburg, the regimental 
historian says that "a braver man never lived; a truer man never wore the garb of 
Christianity." 

At Resaca, among the Confederate dead which lay so thickly in front of the Twenty- 
seventh Indiana, was a family group : a gray-haired Chaplain and his two sons. 

The official reports make frequent mention of Chaplains whose gallantry and zeal had 
attracted the notice of their general. In the Chancellorsville reports, General Berdaii, 
commander of the famous Sharpshooters, states that " Chaplain Barber, of the Second Regi 
ment, took a rifle and went in with the skirmishers, with his usual bravery." 

At Antietam, Gen. J. R. Brooke mentions in his report " the brave Chaplain of the Sixty 
-sixth New York, Rev. Mr. D wight, who was constantly in the field, in the thickest of the 
fight." 

Gen. Giles A. Smith, in his report of the battle of Atlanta (July 22d), states that Chaplain 
Bennett, of the Thirty-second Ohio, "carried his musket and fought all day in the ranks, 
which I learn is his custom on all such occasions." 

The officers of a brigade petitioned that Chaplain H. C. Trumbull, of the Tenth Connec 
ticut, be brevetted a Major ; stating that, "always at his post in time of danger, he has, 
on two occasions at least, displayed marked and conspicuous gallantry ; dashing into the 
thickest of the fight to rally and encourage the wavering line." Gen. Terry forwarded the 
paper with the endorsement: "No officer of his regiment has displayed more gallantry in 
action, or done more to animate the men to do their duty. " 

Aside from such notices, these men have not received the recognition due their services, 
but lack of space forbids further mention here. 

Many of the Chaplains had served in the ranks as enlisted men prior to their appoint 
ment. They were regularly ordained clergymen, whose patriotic zeal had impelled them to 
exchange their pulpits for the camp ; so, when a vacancy occurred in the chaplaincy of a 
regiment to which any such belonged, the Colonel was very apt to recommend the clerical 
musket-bearer, whose gallantry perhaps had already attracted his attention. 

In this connection, mention should also be made of the many clergymen who left their 
pastoral duties to accept commissions in the army, some of whom held regimental or brigade 
commands. Among the brigade commanders killed at Cold Harbor was the Rev. Jeremiah 



* Love : Wisconsin in the War. 



MUSICIANS. 

C. Drake, Colonel of the One Hundred and Twelfth New York, an officer conspicuous for 
gallant and meritorious service on many occasions. A similar instance is found in the Con 
federate Army in the case of Bishop Polk, a corps-general, who fell while on the Atlanta 
campaign. 

The musicians formed a numerous class among the non combatants. Although their 
legitimate duty in time of hattle was confined to that of stretcher-bearers, they often partic 
ipated in the fighting. At Shiloh, the hand of the Forty -eighth Ohio laid aside their instru 
ments, procured rifles, and went into the fight, where two of their numl>er were killed.* Still, 
it must l>e confessed that the dead drummer-hoy was not so common a feature on the field as 
might be inferred from the work of hattle- field artists. 

The frequent loss of life among the stretcher-bearers attests the faithful work of the men 
employed in that duty, most of whom were musicians. At the battle of the Weldon Railroad, 
the ambulance train of the Fifth Corps lost 2 sergeants killed and stretcher-men wounded : 
8 horses were killed, and shells passed through two of the ambulances. This was not an 
uncommon experience. 

Major John A. Bering : History of the Forty-eighth Ohio Volunteers. 



CHAPTER V. 



CASUALTIES COMPARED WITH THOSE OF EUROPEAN WARS --LOSS IN EACH 
ARM OF THE SERVICE DEATHS FROM DISEASE CLASSIFICATION OF 
DEATHS BY CAUSES. 

TT WAS the greatest war of the century. On the Union side alone, 110,070 men were 

killed in battle, while 249,458 more died from disease, accidents, in military prisons, or 
from other causes. Including both sides, over half a million lives were lost. There have 
been wars which have lasted longer-- wars with intermittent and desultory campaigns ; but, 
in this struggle the two armies for four years never let go their clutch upon each other s 
throat. For four years the echo of the picket s rifle never ceased. 

It is hard to realize the meaning of the figures, 110,070 men killed ; and that, on one side 
only. It is easy to imagine one man killed ; or ten men killed ; or, perhaps, a score of men 
killed. With some effort of the mind one can picture a hundred men stretched, lifeless and 
bloody on the ground. The veteran recalls, as if in a dream, the sight of many more lying 
011 some battle field ; but even he is unable to comprehend the dire meaning of the one 
hundred thousand, whose every unit represents a soldier s bloody grave. 

The figures are too large. They will be better understood, however, and a more intelli 
gent idea will be formed if they are compared with the losses of other wars. A better idea 
will also be obtained of the great struggle which occurred within our own borders, and with 
it will come a fuller recognition of American manhood. 

The Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 was one of the greatest of European wars. Larger 
armies were never assembled. The Germans took 797,950 men into France. Of this number, 
28,277 were killed, or died of wounds a loss of 3.1 per cent. In the Crimean war, the allied 
armies lost 3.2 per cent, in killed, or deaths from wounds. In the war of 1866, the Austrian 
army lost 2.6 percent, from the same cause. But, in the American Civil War the Union 
Armies lost 4.7 per cent., and the Confederates over 9 per cent.; and this despite the greater 
area of country, which required a large share of the troops to protect the lines of communi 
cation. There are no figures on record to show that, even in the Napoleonic wars, there was 
ever a greater percentage of loss in killed. In fact, all the statistics pertaining to the earlier 
wars of the century are loosely stated, and bear on their face a lack of accuracy. The histo 
rians of that period give all battle losses in round numbers, the killed, wounded, missing, and 
prisoners being lumped together in one amount. Each writer treats the casualties as an 
unimportant part of his story, and seems to have made no effort to arrive at anything like an 
accurate or classified statement. Perhaps, the facts were not attainable and the historians 
were obliged to accept the wild, exaggerated stories of which there are always a plenty, and 
which soon crowd out of sight the truthful narratives. 

The two great battles of the age, in point of loss, are Waterloo and Gettysburg. Between 
them there is a remarkable similarity, both in numbers engaged and extent of casualties. 

(46) 



CASUALTIES AT (JTETTYSBUKG COMPARED WITH EUROPEAN BATTLES. 47 

At Waterloo, the French numliered 80,000 men, and 252 guns ;* the Allies miml>ered 72,ooo 
men, and 18<> guns. At Gettysburg, the Union Army numl>ered S3, (MM) men, and 300 
guns ;f the Confederates, 70,000 men, and 250 guns. At Waterloo, Wellington s army 
lost 23,185; at Gettysburg, Meade s army lost 23,003. The loss of the French at 
Waterloo has never been officially announced, but has Ixjen estimated at 20,300 ; the Confed 
erate loss at Gettysburg, as officially reported by the Confederate Surgeon -General, was 
20,448, to which must be added 7,077 wounded and unwounded prisoners whose names were 
omitted from his lists, but whose names appear on the records at Washington. In short, the 
battles of Waterloo and Gettysburg were fought with from 70,000 to 82,000 men on each side, 
and the combatants lost about 23,000 men each. 

In the Franco-Prussian war, the greatest loss occurred at the battle of Gravelotte, where 
the Germans lost 4,449 killed (including the mortally wounded), 15,189 wounded, and 939 
missing ; total, 20,577, out of 140,000 troops engaged, exclusive of (55, 000 reserves. At Get 
tysburg, Meade s army sustained a greater loss with half the number engaged. 

It may be suggested that the Franco-Prussian war was, comparatively, of brief duration, 
and hence a comparison of the aggregate casualties cannot properly l>e made. But, in the 
American Civil War, during the six months following May 4, 18<4, the various Union armies 
sustained a greater loss than the German armies did during the whole Franco-Prussian war. 
The total loss of the German army in that war was 28,277 killed or mortally wounded, 85,4.S2 
wounded, and 14,138 missing; total, 127,897. 

All historians agree that Borodino was the bloodiest battle since the introduction of gun- 
)>owder. The casualties in that battle have been variously stated : The Encyclopedia Brit- 
tannica puts the Russian loss at 30,000 in killed, wounded, ami prisoners, and the French loss 
at "considerably above 20,000." Allison gives the losses at Borodino in round numbers only, 
placing the French loss at 50,000, and the Russian at 45,000. The most credible statement is 
found in the Journal of The London Statistical Society, which places the number of killed 
and wounded in the French army at Borodino at 2S,085, out of 133,000 troops present on the 
field. The Russian army numbered 132,ooo at that battle, and there is nothing to show that 
its loss was greater than that of its antagonist. Although the nuiiuVr of killed and wounded 
at Borodino was greater, numerically, than at Waterloo and Gettysburg, the percentage of 
loss was very much less. 

The largest armies were marshalled at Leipsic, "the battle of the Nations." On that 
field the allies concentrated 330,000 men ;* Napoleon s army numbered 175,000. The state 
ments of the casualties as made by various historians are so conflicting, and are so loosely 
stated, that no definite idea of the loss can be obtained. It was greater, probably, than at 
Borodino. 

In the American Civil War, the Union Armies lost 110,070 killed or mortally wounded, 
and 275,175 wounded; total, 385,245, exclusive of the missing in action whose numtor has 
not, as yet, been officially stated. Of the 110,070 deaths from battle, 07,058 were killed on 
the field; the remainder, 43,012, died of their wounds. This loss was divided among the 
different arms of the service as follows : 



* Allison. 

tThe t omte de Paris, in his history of tho war. estimates that the Union army had only tti.OOO aotually on tho field 
return of JuneflOth, shows 99.131 " Present for duty, equipped." Still, in view of the constant discrepan.-y between the numl* 
Union regiments as "present for duty," and the number reported by them as taken into action, the estimate of the 
assumed to be substantially correct. It * very doubtful if Meade had over W,000 men on the field, Including the : 
reserve. Historians vary as to the numbers engaged at Waterloo. 

; At Uic first duy s battle there were IttS.OUO present. 

$ General Lee had about 60,000 men at Gettysburg, i resent in action. His cavalry were absent. 



48 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 
KILLED OR DIED OF WOUNDS. 



Service. Officers. 

Infantry 5,461 

Sharpshooters 23 

Cavalry 671 

Light Artillery . _ . 116 

5 
4 



-Heavy Artillery 
Engineers . . . 



Enlisted Men. 

91,424 
443 

9,925 

1,701 

124 

72 



General Officers 
fGeneral Staff,. 
Unclassified . 



67 

18 



16 



Total. 6,365 



103,705 



Total. 

96,885 

466 

10,596 

1,817 

129 

76 

67 

18 

16 

110,070 



Ratio of 
Officers to Men. 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 



16.7 

17.7 
14.7 
14.6 

24.8 
18.0 



1 : 16.2 



The losses in the three principal classes of troops were : 

KILLED OR DIED OF WOUNDS. 



Class. Officers. 

Volunteers 6,078 

Regulars 144 

Colored Troops. 143 



Enlisted Men. 

98,815 
2,139 
2,751 



Total. 6,365 



103,705 



Total. 

104,893 

2,283 
2,894 

110,070 



Ratio of 
Officers to Men. 

1 : 16.2 
1 : 14.8 
1 : 19.2 



DIED BY DISEASE. 

(Nor INCLUDING DEATHS IN PRISONS.) 



Class. Officers. 

Volunteers. .. 2,471 

Regulars. 104 

Colored Troops. 137 



Enlisted Men. 

165,039 

2,448 
29,521 



Total. 2,712 



197,008 



Total. 

167,510 

2,552 
29,658 

199,720 



1 : 16.3 



Ratio of 
Officers to Men. 

1 : 66.7 
1 : 23.5 
1 : 215.5 



1 : 72.6 



The total number of men enrolled during the four years of the war was 2,778,304. But 
a large proportion of them enlisted for ninety days, six months, one year, or two years, and 
reentered the service upon the expiration of their term of enlistment. Thus, the names of 
many soldiers appear two or more times upon the rolls, and in different regiments. Reduced 
to a three years standard of enlistment, the total enrollment of the Union Army would equal 
2,326,168 men. Using this as a basis for computation, the following percentages are obtained : 

KILLED OR DIED OF WOUNDS. 



Class. 

Volunteers . _ 


Enrolled. 

2 080 193 


Killed. 

104 893 


Per cent. 
5 


Regulars . 


67 000 


2 283 


3 4 


Colored Troops. 


178 975 


2 894 


1 6 










Total. .. 


2 326 168 


110 070 


4 7 











* Heavy Artillery, acting as infantry, is included with the infantry. 
t Does not include officers in volunteer regiments detailed on staff duty. 

t Many of the Kegulars were stationed on post duty. The Regular regiments in the field sustained losses fully as heavy as those of the 
Volunteers. 



DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES. 40 
DIED OF DISEASE. 

(Nor INCLUDING DEATHS IN PRISONS.) 

Class - Enrolled. Die,/. Percent 

Volunteers. 2,080,193 1<;7,510 8.0 

Regulars. G7,00o 2,552 3.H 

Colored Troops 178,1)75 29,658 16.:, 

Total. 2,326,1(58 11)9,720 8.5 

DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES. 

f last Enrolled. Dud. Percent. 

Volunteers. 2,080,103 316,883 15.2 

Regulars. 67,000 5,798 8.6 

Colored Troops 178,975 36,S47 20.5 



Total. 2,826,16$ 359,528 15.4 

Tin* number of deaths from disease was remarkable, being more than double the mnnW 
from hattle. Without including the deaths in Confederate prisons, or those caused by acci 
dents, drowning, sunstrokes, suicides, executions, murders, or other causes, there were 199.- 
720 of the Union Army who died of disease in camp, in hospitals, or at home- lefore their 
term of enlistment had expired. Part of this extraordinary loss was due to the severity of 
the campaigns. The extent of territory marched over was immense ; some of the campaigns 
were made under a tropical sun, and some of the battles were fought amid the snows of 
winter. The Ninth Corps fought on the Carolina Coast, and then moved a thousand miles 
westward to the fever-smitten camps at Vicksburg. The Twelfth Corps, after lighting for 
two years in Virginia, moved to Tennessee, from whence it fought its way through Georgia 
to Atlanta ; marched from Atlanta to the Sea, and thence northward to its old battle grounds, 
having encircled half a continent. Men from the woods of Maine encamped two thousand 
miles distant along the bayous of Louisiana. Men from the prairies of the Northwest toiled 
and battled among the everglades of Florida, and along the (Julf. Human endurance was 
often tested to its utmost, and the restless, moving armies left in their wake a line of count 
less graves. 

And, yet, some of the greatest losses by disease occurred in regiments that were not sub 
jected to the exposure of active service ; regiments, which |H?rformed garrison duty only, 
and were provided with comfortable quarters and good food. The greatest loss by disease 
occurred in some black regiments which were doing garrison duty, and were stationed in the? 
same district from which they had been recruited and where they had lived all their lives. 
Then, again, certain regiments among the white troops suffered from disease, unaccountably, 
more than others. The Vermont Brigade, while encani|>ed in Virginia, in lsr.1, lost scores of 
men by disease, while the regiments in adjoining camps were entirely exempt ; and, yet, these 
Vermonters excelled in physique, cleanliness and intelligence. 

The most striking feature of the mortuary statistics is that the regiments which incurred 
the greatest loss in battle are the ones which suffered least from disease. While, throughout 
the whole army, the deaths from disease were double those from bullets, the hard fighting 
regiments seldom lost even a like number. One fifth of the deaths from disease occurred in 
regiments that never were in battle. 

In connection with this matter one must bear in mind, also, the ratio of mortality in civil 
life. Assuming the average age of the soldiers to be 23 years, the tables of the Life Insurance 
Actuaries indicate that three-fourths of the deaths from disease were due to the ex|M>sure of a 
4 



50 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

soldier s life ; and that the remainder would have occurred, just the same, if the men had 

remained at home. 

Of those who died from disease, one-fourth died of fever, principally typhoid ; one-fourth 
died of diarrhea, or other forms of bowel complaint ; nearly one-fourth died from inflamma 
tion of the lungs, or consumption, principally the former ; the remaining fourth died of 
small-pox, measles, brain disease, erysipelas, and the various forms of disease common to the 

masses. 

The deaths in the Union Army, from all causes, as officially classified were as follows : 

DEATHS FEOM ALL CAUSES. 

Cause. Officers. Enlisted Men. Aggregate. 

Killed, or died of wounds 6,365 103,705 110,070 

Died of disease.. 2,712 197,008 199,720 

In Confederate prisons- 83 24,783 24,866 

Accidents 142 3,972 4,114 

Drowning 106 4,838 4,944 

Sunstrokes 5 308 313 

Murdered 37 483 520 

Killed after capture 14 90 104 

Suicide! 26 365 391 

Military executions 267 267 

Executed by the enemy __ 4 60 64 

Causes known, but unclassified 62 1,972 2,034 

Cause not stated. 28 12,093 12,121 



Aggregate 9,584 349,944 359,528 

The deaths from accidents were caused, principally, by the careless use of fire-arms, 
explosions of ammunition, and railway accidents ; in. the cavalry service, a large number of 
accidental deaths resulted from poor horsemanship. 

The number of the drowned may seem large, but the average is less than three men to a 
regiment. This loss was occasioned largely by bathing and boating. At times, some regi 
ment would sustain a larger loss while fording livers, or landing from small boats in the surf. 
The Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, while crossing the Shenandoah, in April, 1862, lost 2 officers 
and 51 men, drowned by the swamping of a scow. 

Of the Union soldiers confined in Confederate prisons, 24,866 died of disease, exclusive of 
2,072 who died of wounds while in the enemy s hands, and 3,218 others who died from various 
causes, known and unknown. As to what proportion of these 24,866 deaths was due to harsh 
treatment, instead of -disease, it would be difficult to say. In. the Northern military prisons, 
where the inmates were furnished with good food and quarters, the death rate was nearly the 
same; 30,152 Confederates died in Northern prisons. f But these pages have nothing to do 
with the prison question other than the statistics. 

* la addition to this number, there were 5,290 who died while prisoners, and who are included in the other items ot this classification. The 
total number of Union soldiers who died while in the hands of the enemy according to this official report was 30,156. The causes of their deaths 
are classified as follows : From disease, 24.866 ; wounds, 2,072 ; sunstroke, 20 : accidents, 7 ; drowning, 7 ; killed after capture, 104 ; executed 
by the enemy, 64 ; causes known, but not classified, 319 ; cause not stated, 2,697 ; total, 30,156. But, owing to the imperfect records kept at some 
of the Confederate prisons, the deaths are not all included in the foregoing statement. The mortality of Uniou prisoners, as shown by the 
graves, has been estimated at 86,401. 

t Congressional Documents: Report of House Committee on treatment of prisoners, 1869, page 231. (But this number, 30,152 does not 
include the deaths at Johnson s Island ao d some other places of confinement ; neither does it include deaths from wounds in field hospitals.) 



DEATHS AT ANDERSON VILLE AND ELMIKA PHISONS. 51 

The principal place of confinement for Union soldiers \vus at Anderson vi lie, (la. Out of 
45,013 prisoners confined there, 12, J12 died or, 28 per cent. The greatest mnnl>er present at 
any time was 33,114 --on August 8, 1804. The greatest mnnl>er of deaths in any one day was 
127 on August 23, 1804. The daily average of deaths was Jl jf. 

The largest military prison in the North was located at Klmira, N. Y. As at Andcrson- 
ville, it consisted of an open stockade or prison pen. In it were conlined 11,010 prisoners, of 
whom 2,004 died, or 25 percent. The greatest mortality occurred in March, lsor, in which 
month 405 died at Ehnira. Of the total numlxr that died, 2,OS8 were hnried in a field which 
has since heen ploughed over and planted with wheat ; and now the grain of summer and the 
snow of winter show no sign of the hapless Confederates who are laid at rest beneath its 
surface. 



CHAPTER VI. 



THE COLORED TROOPS --HISTORY OF THEIR ORGANIZATION- THEIR LOSSES 

IN BATTLE AND BY DISEASE. 

VJI/ HEREVER black regiments were engaged in battle during the Civil War, they acquitted 
themselves in a manner which fully justified the policy of the Government in enlisting 
their services. In the future wars of the Republic the colored American will find himself 
entrusted with his full share of the fighting. 

And yet, the war for the Union was not the first one in which the African fought for the 
Stars and Stripes. Black faces were not uncommon among the ranks of the patriots in 1776. 
The first man to fall in that struggle was the negro* who led the mob in its attack on the 
British troops at the Boston Massacre. At Bunker Hill, the free negroes fought intermingled 
with the whites ; and, when Major Pitcairn was killed, it was by a bullet from a negro s rifle. 
At the battle of Rhode Island, Colonel Greene s black regiment repulsed three successive 
charges, during which they handled a Hessian regiment severely, f In the war of 1812, Gen 
eral Jackson issued a proclamation authorizing the formation of black regiments, and, subse 
quently, in an address to the colored troops thus enlisted, acknowledged their services in 
unstinted praise. 

But, at the time of the Civil War the negro was closely associated in the public mind with 
the political causes of the strife. The prejudice and opposition against the use of colored 
troops was so strong that the war was half finished before they were organized to any 
extent. 

The first appearance of the negro in the military operations of that period occurred, 
September, 1862, in Cincinnati, at the time of the threatened invasion by Morgan s raiders. 
A so-called Black Brigade of three regiments was then organized, and assigned to duty in 
constructing the fortifications and earthworks about Cincinnati. These men gave their 
services voluntarily, but were unarmed and without uniforms. Their organization, such as 
it was, existed for three weeks only, and had no connection with the movement for enlisting 
colored troops. 

About this same time General Butler took the initiative in the enlistment of colored men as 
soldiers, by organizing at new Orleans the regiments known as the Louisiana Native Guards, 
one of which completed its organization in August, 1862, and was mustered into service on 
the 27th of the following month. It was designated the First Louisiana Native Guard, and 
was the first black regiment to join the Union Army. The Second Louisiana Native Guard 

* Crispus Attucks : His body was placed iu Faneuil Hall, and honored with a public funeral. With others who fell, he was buried beneath 
a stone bearing the words : 

" Long as in Freedom s cause the wise contend, 
Dear to your country shall your fame extend , 
While to the world the lettered stone shall tell 
Where Caldwell, Attucks, Gray, and Maverick fell." 
t Arnold s History of Rhode Island. 

(52) 



ItKCKUITINtl OF COLOKKD ItKUlMKNTS. . ;; 

was mustered in, Octolxr 12, IS<52 ; the Third, on NovemlxT 24, 1SIJ2. The other regiments 
of the Guard, or Corps d Afriquo as it was called, completed their organizations within a few 
months later. 

At this time, also, in August, ist .2, recruiting for a colored regiment was commenced in 
Kansas, and over 000 men were soon mustered in. The regiment, however, was not mustered 
into the United States service until January i:{, is<3. It was then. designated the. First 
Kansas Colored Volunteers, hut its name was changed, in December, 1804, to the 79th United 
States Colored Infantrv. 

*/ 

Recruiting for a black regiment had, also, been undertaken in South Carolina by General 
Hunter, and an officer, Sergeant C. T. Trowbridge, had IMHMI detailed for that pur]>ose as early 
as May 7, 18t2. The recruiting progressed slowly, and was attended with so many difficulties 
and discouragements that a complete regimental organization was not effected until Jan. 31, 
1SG3. Some of the companies, however, were organized at an earlier date. Colonel T. W. 
Higginson was assigned to the command of this regiment, his commission dating back to 
November 10, 18<>2. Trowbridge was made Captain of the first company organized, and sub 
sequently promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy. This regiment, First South Carolina, was the 
first slave regiment organized, the Louisiana Native Guard having been recruited largely from 
free blacks. The designation of the First South Carolina was changed by the War Depart 
ment, in February, 1S;4, to Thirty-third United States Colored Infantry. 

Recruiting for the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts commenced in February, 1S<>3, and its ten 
companies were full by May. It was the first colored regiment raised in a Northern State, 
the First Kansas having been recruited largely in Missouri, and partly from enslaved blacks. 
The Fifty-fourth was composed mostly of free men, and its recruits came from all the North 
ern States, it being their first opportunity to enlist. 

By this time the movement had become general, and before the war closed the colored 
troops embraced 14."> regiments of infantry, 7 of cavalry, 12 of heavy artillery, 1 of light 
artillery, and 1 of engineers ; total, H 5i{. Of these, about >o were brought into action on the 
battle field, the others having been assigned to post or garrison duty. 

Of the regiments brought into action, only a few were engaged in more than one battle ; 
the war was half over, and so the total of killed does not ap]>caras great as it otherwise would 
have done. The total number killed or mortally wounded in the colored troops was 143 
officers, and -2,751 men. The officers were whites. Though participating only in the latter 
campaigns of the war, the black regiments made a noble record, and if, at times, they failed 
to win victories, it was through no fault of theirs. 

The first action in which colored troops were engaged was an affair at Island Mounds, 
Mo., October 2S, 1S02, in which a detachment of the First Kansas was attacked by a superior 
mimlxn- of Confederates under command of Colonel Cockerel. Although outnuml>ered, they 
made a successful resistance and scored a victory. Their lost was K killed, including a Cap 
tain, and 12 wounded. The First Kansas, also, lost 16 men killed on May 18, 18C.3, in a minor 
engagement at Sherwood, Mo. 

In the Assault on Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863, colored troops were used for the firs 
time in a general engagement. The Nineteenth Army Corps, during its l>esiegement of that 
stronghold, included several colored regiments in its organization. There were the First and 
Third Louisiana Native Guawls ; The First Louisiana Engineers, Corps d Afrique ; and, 
Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Infantry, Corps d Afrique. During the siege the 
First Louisiana Native Guards lost 2 officers and 32 men killed, and : J officers and 92 men 
wounded (including the mortally wounded); total, 129. But few regiments in the Nineteenth 
Corps sustained a greater loss. The other regiments of the Corps d Afrique were actively 
engaged, but with fewer casualties. The Fii-st Louisiana Native Guard was attached to 



54 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Augur s (1st) Division, and participated in the assaults of May 27th and June 14th, in which 
its principal loss occurred, its dead .lying among those nearest the enemy s works. This 
regiment should not be confounded with the First Louisiana Infantry, also of Augur s Division, 
-a white regiment which, also, sustained a severe loss at Port Hudson. 

On June 7th, 1803, the colored troops composing the garrison at Milliken s Bend, La., 
were attacked by Walker s Division numbering 3,000 men. The garrison consisted of three 
colored regiments : the Ninth Louisiana, Eleventh Louisiana, and First Mississippi, In addi 
tion there were 200 men of the 23d Iowa (white) who had been escorting prisoners up the 
river, and were on their return to the front. The regiments were small, many of the men, 
and most of the officers, being absent on recruiting service or other duty. When attacked 
the garrison was driven back to the river, where two gunboats came to their assistance. The 
troops then made a counter charge, regaining possession of their works and capturing several 
prisoners. The fighting was desperate in the extreme, many of the combatants on each side 
falling by bayonet thrusts or blows from clubbed muskets. The loss, as officially stated by 
the Assistant Secretary of War, who was then at Vicksburg, amounted to : 

Regiment. Killed. Wounded. Total. 

9th Louisiana. 62 130 192 

llth Louisiana. 30 120 150 

1st Mississippi . 3 21 24 

23d Iowa (white).. 26 60 86 

With the wounded are included those who were mortally wounded. Captain Miller, of 
the Ninth Louisiana, " :: ~ states that his regiment had only 300 men engaged, and that the whole 
force of the garrison was about 600 men. 

The next action in which colored troops were engaged was the grand assault on Fort 
Wagner, July 18, 1863. To the 54th Massachusetts Colored was assigned the honor of leading 
the attack, and after the troops w r ere formed on the beach, ready for the assault, the order to 
advance was withheld until the Fifty-fourth could march by and take position at the head of 
the column. The assault failed ; but, not until the Colonel of the Fifty-fourth and many of 
his men had fallen dead on the parapet, or within, the fort. The loss of the regiment in this 
affair was 3 officers and 31 men killed, 11 officers and 135 men wounded (including those 
mortally so), and 92 men missing ; total, 272 out of 650 engaged. An impression has gained 
ground that no quarter was given to black troops ; and, that the 92 missing or captured men 
met their death in the fort, after they had surrendered. But the official records show that 49 
of these men died of disease in Confederate prisons, and that others of the captured men 
returned at the close of the war, rejoining their regiment before its muster-out. 

One of the severest regimental losses during the war, occurred in the Eighth United States 
Colored Infantry, at the battle of Olustee, Fla., February 20, 1864. It lost there 2 officers and 
49 men killed, 9 officers and 180 men wounded, and 63 missing ; total, 303. The missing ones 
were, mostly, dead or wounded men who were left on the field ; for, in this action the Con 
federates held possession of the ground, General Seymour s forces being obliged to retreat. 
Colonel Fribley of the Eighth was among the killed. The number of the killed was increased 
to 87 by those who died of wounds, and certain ones who were erroneously included with the 
missing. This same regiment distinguished itself, also, at Chaffin s Farm. 

Upon the opening of the spring campaign in 1864, colored troops were a common feature 
of the armies before Eichmond. Ferrero s Division of the Ninth Corps, and Hinks Division 
of the Eighteenth Corps, were composed entirely of black regiments. In the first attack on 



* Brown : Negro in the Rebellion. 



FKKUKUO S DIVISION AT THE BATTLE OF THE MINE. 55 

Petersburg, June 15, 1864, Kinks Division achieved a brilliant success, capturing (he lino of 
works in its front, and seven pieces of artillery. Had the Army of the Potomac arrived in 
time to follow up the success of the colored troops, Petersburg would have l>een taken then ; 
but, by the time that the Eighteenth corps was reenforeed. Lee s army had hurried thither by 
rail and were filing into the intrenchments. The opportunity was gone. In this assault of 
June 15th, the casualty lists show that the temporary success of the Colored Division was 
dearly obtained. Among the heavier losses were : 

Regiment. Killed. Wounded* Mistin^ Total. 

4th U. S. Colored Infantry. 15 no lo 135 

22dU. S. Colored Infantry. 14 nr> 138 

The first opportunity to go into action granted Ferrero s Division, was at the Mine Explo 
sion, or battle of The Crater, at Petersburg, July HO, 18(54. This division was selected to le;ul 
the assault ; but, at the last moment, the order was changed and it was sent in last. It was 
not ordered forward until the assault was a bloody failure, and although it did all that men 
could do, it was unable to retrieve the disaster. This change of plan relieved the colonel 
regiments of all responsibilty for that defeat. Still, they fought bravely, and held their 
ground under the most discouraging circumstances. How well they stood is attested by 
their terrible losses. 

CASUALTIES IX FERRERO S DIVISION AT THE RATTLE OF THE MINE, 

JULY 3o, 1S04. 

Regiment. Killed. Wounded* Missing.\ Total. 

23d U. S. Colored Infantry. 74 115 121 3io 

20th U. S. Colored Infantry. 21 50 47 124 

31st U. S. Colored Infantry. 27 42 GO 135 

43d U. S. Colored Infantry. 14 80 123 

30th U. S. Colored Infantry- 1* 1-* 

39th U. S. Colored Infantry. 13 97 47 157 

28th U. S. Colored Infantry. 11 <>4 13 

27th U. S. Colored Infantry. 9 40 

19th U. S. Colored Infantry. 6 

Total K97 421 1,327 

To any one familiar with the extent of regimental losses in action, these figures tell a 

heroic story. 

Hard fighting was also done by colored troops at Chaftin s Farm, September 
where Paine s Division (colored) of the Eighteenth Corps, and Birney s* Colored Brigade of 
the Tenth Corps --in all, about 10,000 strong- -were actively engaged. These troops partic 
ipated in the assaults on Fort Gilmer and the intrenchments at New Market Heights 
Among the regiments sustaining the heaviest losses were the following : 



Regiment. 

Oth U S Colored Infantry 


Killed. 
41 


ll ountied.* 

100 


.\fissing. 

- 


olal. 
209 


5th U S Colored Infantry 


28 


185 


23 


230 


4th U S Colored Infantry 


27 


137 


14 


178 


30th U S Colored Infantrv 


21 


87 


_ _ 


108 


38th U. S. Colored Infantry . 


17 


94 


-- 


111 


* Includes the mortally woundod. 


t A lanre 

,..i...i tii.. T..n!\i i , irns in this 


proportion of the iiilalnc 

battle. 


were killed 


or wounded. 



56 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE ClVIL WAR. 

The Sixth had only 367 officers and men engaged, its loss being over 57 per cent. The 
troops in Paine s Division were the same ones which carried the works at Petersburg, June 
15, 1864 

In the action on the Darbytown Road, Va., October 27, 1864, the Twenty-ninth Connecti 
cut (colored) distinguished itself by the efficiency with which it held a skirmish line for 
several hours, under a strong pressure. Loss, 11 killed and 69 wounded. 

Two brigades of colored troops participated in the victory at Nashville, December 15, 
1864. The heaviest loss in any regiment on that field occurred in the Thirteenth U. S. Colored 
Infantry, which, in its assault on Overton Hill, lost 55 killed (including 4 officers), and 166 
wounded ;* total, 221. 

The severest loss at the battle of Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864, fell on a black 
regiment, the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, which lost in that action, 29 killed, and 115 wounded ; 
total, 144. 

In the closing battle of the war the victorious assault on Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9, 
1865 --a colored division bore a conspicuous and honorable part. Among the casualties in 
that engagement the following are worthy of note : 

Regiment. Killed. Wounded* Missing Total. 

68th U. S. Colored Infantry 10 91 101 

76th U. S. Colored Infantry. 13 78 91 

In addition to the battles heretofore mentioned, colored troops were prominently engaged 
in the following actions : 

Morris Island, S. 0. James Island, S. C. Liverpool Heights, Miss. 

Yazoo City, Miss. Pleasant Hill, La. Prairie d Ann, Ark. 

Poison Springs, Ark. Camden, Ark. Jenkins Ferry, Ark. 

Saline River, Ark. Fort Pillow, Tenn. Natural Bridge, Fla. 

Morganzia, La. Jacksonville, Fla. B rice s X Roads, Miss. 

Tupelo, Miss. Athens, Ala. Drewry s Bluff, Va. 

Bermuda Hundred, Va. Dutch Gap, Va. Deep Bottom, Va. 

Darbytown Road, Va. Hatcher s Run, Va. Fair Oaks, Va. (1864) 

Saltville, Va. Deveaux Neck, S. C. Boykin s Mills, S. C. 

Cox s Bridge, N. C. Fort Fisher, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. 

Spanish Fort, Ala. Fall of Richmond. Appomattox, Va. 

They rendered effective and meritorious services in many of these engagements, and, in 
some of them, sustained serious losses. 

* Includes the mortally wounded. 



CHAPTER VII. 



MUSTER-OUT-ROLLS - ANTHROPOLOGICAL STATISTICS. 

E statistics presented in thoso pages are based largely on a personal examination of the 
muster-out-rolls of the various regiments. When a regiment was mustered out of 
service at the close of the war, or at the expiration of its term of enlistment, -- each com 
pany in the organization was required to hand in a muster-out roll hearing the names of every 
man who, at any time, had served in it. The rolls, which wore furnished in blank for this 
purpose, were large sheets, nearly one yard square, ruled and printed with various headings. 
Each company- roll was made out separately, making ten rolls in all (if in a ten-company 
regiment), with an additional roll for the Field and Staff. 

Opposite each name was written the age of the person ; place of enlistment ; date of 
muster-in ; and, under the column of "Remarks," statements showing what became of the 
man ; --if dead, the cause, date, and place of death. 

These names were grouped under the various headings of : " Present at muster-out ;" 
"Previously discharged; "Transferred;" "Deserted;" "Killed in action;" " Died of 
wounds ;" and, "Died of disease ;" or other causes. Three copies of these rolls, sometimes 
more, were made, one of which was forwarded to the capital of the state to which the regi 
ment belonged, where it was filed in the office; of the state adjutant-general. These regi 
mental rolls and records may be found carefully preserved among the archives of each state, 
and it is evident that such of them as were properly made will show clearly and accu 
rately the mortuary losses of the regiments to which they pertain. 

The states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connec 
ticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan. 
Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Kansas have printed and published the muster-out-mils of 
the regiments which they respectively furnished to the Union Armies. The name of each 
and every man who served in these regiments is preserved in print ; the record of his patriotism 
is transmitted, and in time becomes the proudest heir-loom of his family. 

Some of these publications are, necessarily, voluminous. The rolls of the Illinois troops 
fill eight octavos ; the Indiana rolls require eight volumes of similar si/e ; the names of the 
men in the Massachusetts regiments fill two largo quartos of about one thousand pages each ; 
the Pennsylvania rolls,* as printed, cover 7, Ooo pages. Still, despite the tedious length of these 
rolls, the patient student will be able to compile from them the losses in nearly every regiment. 
The states of New York, Delaware and Maryland have never attached enough value to the 
patriotic services of their troops to publish their muster-out-rolls. t The manuscript rolls of 
the New York regiments are on file at Albany, and the historian must make a pilgrimage 
thither if he would learn anything concerning the heroes who followed the colors of the 
Empire State. 

History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers: S. J . Hates. 

tNew York published its muster-in-rolls. :i work of little value, as It is merely a list of names with no records attached ; there I* nothing In 
it to show that New York ever lost a man in battle, or that the regiments ever left the State. 

(57) 



58 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Some of the state rolls, both printed and manuscript, are defective ; many of the men 
are unaccounted for, or accounted for erroneously ; and, for some regiments, the rolls are 
missing entirely. But, in such cases the different states have perfected their rolls through 
information furnished by the War Department at Washington. 

Owing to the liberal policy of the Government in regard to pensions, the friends of 
deceased soldiers have supplied much of the lacking information in the prosecution of their 
claims. Of course, many of those who were unaccounted for on the rolls had no legal heirs 
to present their claims at the Pension Bureau; men recorded as " wounded and missing in 
action," and who, through lack of family or social ties, disappeared without question or 
remark. But the various state adjutant-generals have been untiring in their efforts to obtain 
information in such cases, and have, for the most part, settled definitely the fate of the 
missing. 

The historian will find in the muster-out-rolls a mine of information valuable and 
necessary to his task. He may have already learned the names of the regiments which were 
present at the battle, and the movements of the brigade, division or corps. But which of these 
regiments did the fighting ? Which of them were in reserve, and which of them were in the 
first line ? Which of them led in the assault ? Which ones stood in the breach ? 

In these records he will find a clear and unequivocal answer. The long column of 
names marked as killed in some particular action tells the story of how well they stood. 
More rolls are searched, and from them he makes a list of regiments whose losses map out 
the points of contact on some field and show plainly where the pressure was heaviest. 

He notes, also, that the records do not warrant the boastful account of some regimental 
historian, while it reflects honor on the gallantry of some command which has hitherto been 
overlooked and unrecognized. He notes, again, that some regiment which has figured con 
spicuously in the official casualty list by reason of its aggregate of losses, did so on account 
of its large number of missing ; and, that of these missing ones few were killed, the remainder 
having been captured. He notes, again, on examining some other rolls, that the number of 
killed is large in proportion to the number enrolled, and so credits the regiment with a per 
centage of loss which tells better than any flight of rhetoric how often and how well they 
faced the enemy s fire. 

The story of the muster-out-roll is, at best, but a sad one. One is carried back to the war 
and surrounded by its sad pictures. In scanning the remarks attached to the names there 
are the ever recurring phrases which recall vividly its thrilling scenes. 

Killed, . July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg;" and one thinks of Pickett s charge, or other 
incidents of that historic field. 

"Killed, May 3, 1863, at Marye s Heights;" and the compiler lays down his pencil to 
dream again of that fierce charge which swept upward over the sloping fields of Fredericksburg. 
Wounded and missing, May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness," suggests a nameless grave 
marked, if at all, by a Government headstone bearing the short, sad epitaph, " Unknown." 

Killed at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862; " and there rises a picture of an artilleryman 
lying dead at the wheels of his gun. 

" Died of gunshot wound before Atlanta, August 20, 1864," tells of some lad who fills a 
grave long miles away from the village church-yard of his Northern home. 

"Wounded at Antietam, September 17, 1862, and died on the amputating table," brings 
up the dire vision of the field-hospital, that ghastly sequel of every battle. 

"Killed at Appomattox, April 9, 1865 ;" and one sees the dead cavalryman, who, falling 
in that closing battle of the war, died with home and victory in sight. 

"Died of sunstroke," recalls the long march, the heavy load, the dust, the heat, and a 
senseless form lying at the roadside. 



TUB STORY OF THE MUSTEK-OUT-ROLL. :. -. 

" Pied of fever at Young s Point, Miss.," reminds one of the campaigns in the bay cms and 
poisonous swamps, with the men falling in scores before a foe more deadly and remorseless 
than the bullet. 

Executed on sentence of G. C. M. ; shot to death by musketry ;" and one recalls the 
incidents of the most trying of all scenes, a military execution. 

" Killed on picket, September 15, 1863, on the Rappahannock," suggests the star-lit river, 
the lonely vidette, an echoing shot, and a man dying alone in the darkness. 

And so it goes. There are no war stories that can equal the story of the muster-out-roll. 

And then, there are facts recorded in them which are curious and interesting. Occasion 
ally the sad record is brightened with something akin to humor ; and, there is much, at times, 
which is readable. The following extracts, taken at random, may give an idea of what one runs 
across in examing these old records. They are copied from the muster-out rolls, manuscript 
and printed, while some are from the rolls appended to regimental histories. If at times the 
sad and the ridiculous are too closely intermingled, it is because tho story runs that way, 
reflecting truly the peculiarly intermingled scenes of army life. 

EXTRACTS FROM MUSTER-Ol T- ROLLS 

Tenth New York Cavalry, Company D : "Lt. Wm. J. Rabb ; killed at Brandy Station, 
by a sabre-thrust through the body while lying under his horse ; he would not surrender." 

Thirty-seventh Wisconsin, Company C :- Sergeant William II. CJreen ; recommended 
for promotion for gallantry in action, Petersburg, Va., Juno 17, ls<;4, where he was wounded 
in both legs, after receiving which he crawled from the field, dragging his colors with his teeth ; 
died July 17, 1864, of wounds." 

Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company B:- "Capt. W. H. Itennett ; wounded and prisoner. 
July 22, 1864 ; leg amputated three times ; died August 1<, ls;4 at Macon, Ga., of wounds. 

First New Jersey, Company A:- "Jordan Silvers; killed on picket near Alexandria, 

Va., October 15, 1861." 

Fifth New Hampshire, Company (I :- : John Velon ; shot for desertion near Petersburg, 

Va., October 28, 1864." 

Fifth Wisconsin, Company A :- * Francis Lee ; first man of regiment to reach enemy : 
works in assault on Petersburg, April 2, 186.5. 

One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, Company A: - Lorenzo Brown ; kicked to death by 
a mule at Somerset, Ky., April 23, 1864." 

Sixty-fifth Ohio, Company. H :--" Corporal Adam Glasgow; discharged May 27, 
on surgeon s certificate ; both feet frozen while eu route from Wilmington, N. C., to Annapo 
lis, Md. ; an exchanged prisoner of war. 

Twenty-first Massachusetts, Company E : :: Sergeant Thomas 
arms while carrying regimental U. S. flag at Fredericksburg ; discharged 

Twenty-fiivt Massachusetts, Company C:* Sergeant Elbridge 
Fredericksburg while carrying the State Hag. 

Twenty-first Massachusetts, Company A : * Sergeant Joseph 
1863, of wounds received at Fredericksburg while carrying the colors 

Seventh Wisconsin, Company H : - Jefferson Coates ; wounded at 
Gettysburg; loss of both eyes; brevetted Captain, with initial of 

Gettysburg. 

Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Company 1): - Charles ]). Fuller ; detected as 

discharged, date unknown." 



From tolls attached to regimental history. 



60 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, Company F : "Sergeant Frank May no ; 
deserted Aug. 24, 1802 ; subsequently killed in battle in another regiment, and discovered to 
be a woman ; real name, Frances Day." 

Second Michigan, Company F : " Franklin Thompson ; deserted." (Charge of deser 
tion removed by House Committee on Military Affairs, Washington, Feb. 1887, the soldier 
having had a good record and had fought well in several battles, but proved to be a woman ; 
real name was Miss Seelye.) 

Twenty-sixth North Carolina (C. S. A.) Company F: "Mrs. L. M. Blaylock ; enlisted 
March 20, 1861 ; discharged for being a woman."* 

Fifty-sixth New York, Company F: "John Hoffman ; killed by lightning at Cashtown, 
Maryland." 

Second New Jersey Cavalry, Company M : - ; " executed at Mem 
phis, Tenn., June 10, 1864, for rape and robbery ; sentence G. C. M." 

Second Wisconsin, Company B : " Robert Swartz ; discharged on account of youth." 

Eleventh Vermont, Company B : "Lt. Edward B. Parker ; died a prisoner at Colum 
bia, S. C., Oct. 13, 1864, from injuries received from bloodhounds." 

Fourth New Jersey, Company C : "Geo. W. Hindley; died in a fit at Alexandria, Va., 
Oct. 7, 1861." 

Seventh Wisconsin, Company A : "Horace A. Ellis ; awarded medal of honor for cap 
ture of flag of the Sixteenth Mississippi at Weldon R. R., Aug. 21, 1864." 

Ninth New Jersey, Company G : "Christian Huber ; shot by rebel sentinel while step 
ping on dead-line at Andersonville, Aug. 5, 1864." 

First Indiana Cavalry, Company L : " Andress Greene ; drafted for nine months ; killed 
in action." 

Twenty-second Indiana, Company C : "Private Eli P. Wells; promoted Chaplain." 

Fifth New York Cavalry, Company H : " Lt. J. A. Benedict ; died from amputation of 
right arm resulting from the bite of a man on thumb, Dec. 1.1, 1861."f 

Fifth New York Cavalry, Company G : " John Evans ; March 7, 1865, had a ball pass 
through a pack of cards and a plug of tobacco, lodging against the skin opposite his heart, "f 

Twenty-first Wisconsin, Company I : "August Meyer ; left camp while insane, and not 
heard from afterwards." 

Thirty-first Maine, Company A: "Fred R. Cole; killed in his tent, Aug. 14, 1864, 
before Petersburg." 

Seventh Indiana, Company E : - - ; " Sentenced by G. C. M. to 

work on fortifications 12 months after expiration of enlistment." 

Second Minnesota, Company F :" William Blake, musician ; threw away his drum and 
took a gun at Mill Springs. " 

Eighth Tennessee (Union), Company C : "Sergeant John Gossett ; killed at Utoy Creek 
while planting his colors on the enemy s works." 

Nineteenth Wisconsin : " Chaplain J. H. Nichols ; died Jan., 1863, in an insane asylum." 

Fifty-second Indiana, Company B : "Timothy Westport ; discharged April 27, 1863, for 
loss of speech." 

T wenty- first Illinois: "Colonel U. S. Grant; enlisted June 15, 1861; promoted Briga 
dier General, Aug. 7, 1861." 

* In the printed rolls of the North Carolina regiments (Confederate) a foot-note, referring to this item, says: "This lady had done a 
soldier s duty without a suspicion of her sex among her comrades, until her husband, L. M. Blaylock, was discharged, when she claimed the 
same privilege, and was sent home rejoicing." 

t Frum records attached to regimental history. 



THE STOKY OF THE MUSTKH-OUT-KOL-L. 61 

Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company G:-- 4 Geo. W. Ide ; died Juno 2, 1804, at Dallas, 
Ga., of sunstroke." 

First Kentucky Cavalry (Union), Company H : "Geo. \V. Ellcr; killed Feb. 10, 1803, 
in a personal difficulty,* in Wayne Co., Ky." 

Fifth Tennessee Cavalry (.Union), Company F : " J. N. Gilliam ; killed near Tracy City, 
Tenn., by guerrillas,* Aug. 4, 1864." 

Eighteenth Wisconsin, Company B: "Redmond McGuire ; killed April 1<>, 1862, in 
prison, by rebel guard, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Thirty -eighth Ohio, Company K: "Jacob Thomas; killed Nov. 17, 1861, by the falling 
of a tree, at Wild Cat, Ky." 

One Hundred and Sixty-second New York, Company E : "John Murphy ; shot while 
endeavoring to escape the guard at New Orleans, April 5, 1863." 

Eighth New York, Company A: "A. Lohman ; died of poison while on picket, by 
drinking from a bottle found at a deserted house." 

Thirtieth Wisconsin, Company C : " E. Olson : killed in a draft riot, Septeml>er 10, 1863, 
at New Lisbon, Wis." 

Eightieth New York, Company C : " John Edleman ; killed by explosion of ammuni 
tion, August 8, 1864, at City Point, Va." 

Sixteenth Wisconsin, Company A:- "(Jeorge Halsey; drafted - ; died February 27, 
1865, Lynch Creek, S. C., of fatigue." 

One Hundred and Seventy-ninth New York, Company E: --" Charles Clements ; killed 
November 14, 1864, by falling from cars while on furlough." 1 

Thirty -ninth Illinois, Company 1) : "John Hays ; killed in a row, July 4, 1865." 

Second Ohio, Company B :--" George I >. Wilson; executed by the Relwls at Atlanta, 
Ga., June 18, 1862 ; charged with being a bridge-burner." (,One of the famous party who 
captured a locomotive at Big Shanty, Ga. i 

Fifth New York Cavalry, Company H : "Edgar C. Shephard ; drowned April 22, 1863, 
while en route home on furlough." 

One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York, Company D: A. \V. Rackett ; killed April 
17, 1863, by a shot from a house while rilling his canteen at a well near Yermillion Bayou, La." 

Fifth Ohio, Company H : " Thos. Kelly; murdered by a comrade." 

Eighth Tennessee (Union). Company C : % G. H. Houston ; dropped to rear sick, and 
murdered by enemy on the Cumberland Mountains, August 25, 1863." 

Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, Company E: John Long; died of poison at Wartrace, 
Tenn., April IS, 1862." 

Fifty-second Indiana, Company B : "William Tyler ; frozen to death near Fort Pillow, 
December 31, 1863." (The rolls of this company show that Lieutenant Edwin Alexander and 
five men were frozen to death in a snow-storm on an island in the Mississippi river, while on 
a scouting expedition.) 

Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry, Company C : J. C. Clifton ; killed in a tight with one 
of his own company February 7, 1865." 

Ninety-second Illinois, Company B :" R. J. O Connor; shot by Lieutenant Pointer, C. 
S. A., while a prisoner of war, and died April 23, 1864. 

In the United States Volunteer Register, the officers roster of the Indian (Kansas) regi 
ments is given, from which the following items are taken : 

First Indian Guards : "Captain Tul-se-fix-se-ko; killed February 1, ls2 

First Indian Guards : " Captain Ah-ha-la-tus-ta-nuk-ke; died at Camp Moonlight, Ark., 
March 23, 1863." 

A frequent item in the Tennessee and Kentucky rolls. 



62 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

First Indian Guards : " Captain Ta-ma-tus-ta-iiuk-ka ; cashiered December 3, 1864." 
First Indian Guards :- --" Captain Ak-ti-yah-gi-ya-ho-la ; deserted December 27, 1862." 
(It is hoped that in the heat of action, these officers did not stand upon their dignity and 
insist upon being addressed by their full names.) 

Second Indian Guards : "Captain Spring Frog; mustered out May 31, 1865." 
Second Indian Guards : "Captain Eli Tadpole ; died of disease April 15, 1863." 
Second Indian Guards : " Lieutenant Andrew Rabbit ; resigned July 12, 1863." 
Second Indian Guards : "Captain Jim Ned; missing since August 31, 1862." 
Second Indian Guards : "Captain Dirt Throw Tiger ; resigned August 1, 1863." 
Third Indian Guards : "Captain Daniel Grasshopper ; died October 3, 1862, of wounds 
received in action." 

Third Indian Guards : " Lieutenant Jumper Duck ; died of disease, October 20, 1863." 
Third Indian Guards : " Lieutenant Redbird Sixkiller ; mustered out May 31, 1865." 
The muster-rolls are provided with a column in which is entered the age of each recruit. 
From the figures in this column it appears that the mean age of all the soldiers was 25 years. 
When classed by ages, the largest class is that of 18 years, from which the classes decrease 
regularly to that of 45 years, beyond which age no enlistment was received. Of 1,012,273 
recorded ages taken from the rolls, there were 133,475 at 18 years ; 90,215 at 19 years, and so 
on. The number at 25 years of age was 46,626 ; and, at 44 years, 16,070.* 

The muster-rolls also state the nativities of the men ; from which it appears that, in 
round numbers, out of 2,000,000 men, three-fourths were native Americans. Of the 500,000 
soldiers of foreign birth, Germany furnished 175,000 ; Ireland, 150,000 ; England, 50,000 ; 
British America, 50,000 ; other countries, 75,000. 

The average height of the American soldiers, as shown by the records of the recruiting 
officers, was 5 feet 8|- inches. The men from Maine, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri and Kentucky, 
were slightly above this figure. The West Virginians averaged 5 feet 9 inches in height. 
The general average would have been greater had it not included the measurements of recruits 
from 17 to 20 years of age, who evidently had not attained their full stature when their 
measurement was recorded. Out of about 1,000,000 recorded heights of soldiers there were 
3,613 who were over 6 feet 3 inches, and among them were some who were over 7 feet.f By 
selecting from the whole Army, there could have been formed regiments and brigades of tall 
men which would have surpassed the famous giant-guards of Frederick the Great. 

But tall men proved to be poor material for a long, toilsome campaign. When, after a 
hard, forced march, the captain looked over his company at nightfall to see how many men 
he had with him, the " ponies" who trudged along at the tail of the company were generally 
all there ; it was the head end of the company that was thinned out. 

The records of the weights of the soldiers are incomplete ; but, such as they are, they 
indicate that the average weight was 143|- pounds. 

The descriptive lists show also the color of hair, from which it appears that 13 per cent, 
of the soldiers had black hair ; 25 per cent, had dark hair ; 30 per cent., brown hair ; 24 per 
cent., light ; 4 per cent., sandy ; 3 per cent., red ; and 1 per cent., gray hair. 



Anthropological Statistics of American Soldiers : by Dr. Benjamin Apthorp Gould. 

f The tallest man for whose stature the testimony is complete and unimpectcnable, is Captain Van Buskirk, of the Twenty-seventh Indiana. 
General Silas Colgrove, formerly colonel of that regiment writes that he has frequently seen him measured and that his stature was full 82> 
inches, without his shoes, or 209.5 centimeters. General Colgrove adds that he was a brave man, and bore the fatigues of marching as well as 
most men of ordinary stature. 

The shortest man for whom the record is satisfactorily verified was a member of the One Hundred and Ninety-second Ohio. At the time of 
enlistment he was 24 years old, and 40 inches in height. Colonel F. W. Butterfleld, his commanding officer, vouches for the correctness of this 
record. He also assures us that he knew the man well ; and, that there was no soldier in his command who could endure a greater amount of 
fatigue and exposure." .>/. . A. Gould. 



( Kvri ATio.Ns OK Mix \\ ii<> KM IM 1 i.. H3 

Also, that as to color of their eyes, 45 ]HT cent, were blue ; 24 |HT cent, were gray ; 18 
per cent, were hazel ; 10 per cent were dark ; ami 8 per cent were black. 

Also, that in complexion, 00 |*>r cent, were light ; M |>ercent. were dark ; and 7 JHT cent, 
were medium. 

From statements as to occupation, it api>ears that 4S JKH* cent, were fanners ; 24 JMM* cent, 
were mechanics ; UJ per cent, were laborei-s ; 5 per cent, were in commercial pin-suits ; 3 per 
cent, were professional men ; 4 per cent, were of miscellaneous vocations. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



CORPS ORGANIZATIONS. 



\\71TH the record of each regiment given in these pages will be found the division and 
corps to which it belonged. The history of a regiment is so largely identical with 
that of its corps, that such information serves at once to familiarize the student with the 
part which it played in connection with the war. An excessive loss in action, or an immunity 
from the casualties of battle, requires but little explanation where there is a thorough ac 
quaintance with the history of the division and corps with which the regiment in question 
was connected. An additional interest, also, attaches to the record of each command as the 
history of its corps is fully understood. 

The corps badges, which were worn by many commands, were first ordered in the spring 
of 1863, and were adopted immediately by the Army of the Potomac ; but in the Western 
armies these badges did not appear on the men s caps until 1864, and then they were only 
partially adopted. In some corps they were not worn at all. The badges were of various 
shapes and were stamped out of flannel cloth ; in size, they were about an inch and one-half 
across, and were fastened conspicuously on the men s caps. They were of different colors, 
the first division of each corps wearing red badges ; the second, white ; and the third, blue. 
The idea originated in 1862 in Kearny s Division, in which the soldiers wore a diamond- 
shaped piece of flannel on their caps. 

The corps badges which were most conspicuous during the war, by reason of their general 
use, were : the round or disc-shaped badge of the First Corps ; the trefoil, or ace of clubs, 
worn by the Second ; the lozenge, or diamond-shaped badge of the Third ; the triangular 
patch of the Fourth ; the Maltese cross, of the Fifth ; the Greek cross, of the Sixth ; the 
crescent of the Eleventh ; the star, of the Twelfth ; and the acorn, of the Fourteenth. 

The various corps were organized, for the most part, with three divisions, each division 
containing three brigades, and each brigade consisting of five regiments, making 45 regiments 
of infantry in a corps, to which were added about nine batteries of light artillery. But 
this form was adhered to only as a general rule, and was varied at times to meet temporary 
exigencies. The greatest variation occurred in the brigades, the depletion, at times, of some 
regiments making additional ones necessary to keep up a proper effective strength. During 
the Atlanta campaign, some brigades in the Fourth and Fourteenth Corps contained nine 
regiments. Then, again, a corps would have occasionally four divisions, and some divisions 
would have four brigades ; but such cases were exceptional, and generally proved to be but 
temporary arrangements. 

In 1S63 the cavalry were organized into a corps by themselves ; prior to that each corps 
was accompanied by a brigade of cavalry regiments. 

Batteries of light artillery, organized in brigades of about five batteries each, were 
attached to each corps, in addition to which the Army of the Potomac had an artillery reserve 

(64) 



THK FIRST COKI*S. 05 

consisting of five brigades 21 batteries in all. This Artillery Corps of the Army of the 
Potomac was under command of General Henry J. Hunt. 

Prior to the adoption of corps organizations, the various armies of the Union consisted of 
divisions numbered in the order of their formation. This plan was adhered to in the Western 
armies until December, 18Gi>. The Army of the Ohio contained several divisions, each division 
containing three brigades. But these brigades were numt>ered without reference to their 
divisions, and hence, in the roster of the Army of Ohio, at Shiloh, we find, for instance, that 
the Fourth DivisionNelson s was composed of the loth, l!th and -J-Jnd Brigades; and at 
Perryville, in the Eleventh Division -- Sheridan s - the brigades were not the 1st, 2d, and :kl, 
but the 35th, 30th and 37th Brigades. The Army of the Tennessee contained six divisions at 
Shiloh, and the Army of the Mississippi fought at luka without any corps formation. This 
lack of proper organization did not last long, and in 18(53 the Western armies took the field 
with corps organizations similar to those which General McClellan had instituted in the Army 
of the Potomac, and which were retained during the remainder of the war. 

KIL ST ( ( HvTS. 

CEDAR MOUNTAIN ; RAPPAHANNOCK ; GAINESVILLE ; GROVETON ; SECOND BULL RUN ; SOUTH 
MOUNTAIN ; ANTIETAM ; FREDERICKSBURG ; FrrzHuGH s CROSSING ; CHANCELLORSVILLE ; GET 
TYSBURG ; MINE RUN. 

The First Corps, when at its maximum, contained 4<> regiments of infantry and 12 bat 
teries of light artillery. It was organized in March, ISttt, with three divisions, King s, 

Mri all s, ami I- Yank lin -. Genera] [rwin McDowell was placed! rnmand. Wlien Gen 

eral McClellan moved the Army to the Peninsula, in April, 18<>2, McDowell s corps was left 
in Northern Virginia. Franklin s Division was ordered, soon after, to the Peninsula, where 
it was used in forming the Sixth Corps, its place in McDowell s command l>eing taken by 
Ricketts Division. In June, McCall s Division --the famous Pennsylvania Reserves was 
also sent to the Peninsular Army, but upon the return of McClellan s forces to Washington, 
the Reserves rejoined McDowell, and fought under him at Second Bull Run. During the 
absence of the Army of the Potomac, McDowell was engaged in an active campaign which 
culminated in the battles around Manassas, the first general engagement in which the corps 
participated ; loss, 595 killed, 2,853 wounded, and 2,021 missing, out of alxmt 18,500 effective 
men. During the short time in which the army was under Pope, McDowell s Corps was 
officially designated as the Third Corps, Army of Virginia; but upon General McClellan s 
restoration to command it resumed its former and proper title, the First Army Corps. 

While on the Maryland campaign the Corps was commanded by General Hooker, and 
the divisions by Generals Hatch, Ricketts and Meade ; it numbered 14,s50 men. It was prom 
inently engaged at South Mountain, and also at Antietam, where it oijened the battle, its 
casualties in that engagement amounting to 41 7 killed, 2,051 wounded and 1-22 missing. Gen- 
eralJohn F. Reynolds was in command at Fredericksburg, with Doubleday, Gibbon and 
Meade as division generals ; loss, 347 killed, i,4i >( . wounded, and 5(51 missing ; total, 3,337. 

After this battle, the division of Pennsylvania Reserves -Meade s (3d) Division - 
withdrawn from the front, and ordered to Washington that it might rest and recruit. This 
division, in addition to the battles of the First Corps, had served previously on the Peninsula, 
where it had encountered hard fighting and heavy losses. While on the Peninsula, the Re- 
serves were attached to the Fifth Corps. When the division rejoined McDowell s Corps, at 
Manassas, it was with depleted ranks which were still further thinned by its subsequent 
battles. After taking its departure for Washington it never rejoined the First Corps, its 

B 



66 KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

place being taken by a division composed of new troops, Doubleday s (3d) Division. The 
corps was only slightly engaged at Chaiicellorsville, it being held in reserve. 

At Gettysburg, in the battle of the first day, this corps did some of the best fighting of 
the war. The division commanders on that field were Wads worth, Robinson and Doubleday; 
General Reynolds, who was still in command of the corps, was killed just as he rode on the 
field, and before his troops were fairly engaged. General Doubleday succeeded to the com 
mand, and handled the corps during that action in a remarkably able manner. A noteworthy 
feature of that day was that the corps, although finally driven from the field by a superior 
force, succeeded in capturing, at different times and at different points on the field, parts of 
three brigades of the enemy, --Archer s, Davis , and Iverson s*- -taking them in open field 
fighting, where there were none of the usual accessories of breastworks, intrenchments, or 
protection of any kind other than that which the field afforded. The First Corps fought that 
day with no other protection than the flannel blouses that covered their stout hearts. It con 
tained 34: regiments of infantry, and 5 batteries of light artillery, numbering 9,403 infantry 
" present for duty, equipped ;" loss, 593 killed, 3,209 wounded and 2,222 missing ; total 6,024, 
out of less than 9,000 in action. Of the missing, a large proportion were killed or wounded. 

Prior to this battle, the roster of the corps had undergone considerable change. Eight 
New York regiments had gone home, their two years term of service having expired; also, one 
nine months regiment from Pennsylvania. These changes reduced the First and Second 
Divisions to two brigades each. The Pennsylvania Reserves had been replaced by a new divis 
ion of two brigades, to which Stannard s Vermont Brigade was added just before the battle. 
Stannard s Brigade was composed of nine -months men whose term of service expired just 
after the battle ; three of his regiments took a prominent part in the fighting of the third 
day, in the repulse of Pickett s charge. 

Gen. John Newton, a division general in the Sixth Corps, was appointed to fill Reynolds 
place, assuming command during the second day s battle at Gettysburg an appointment 
which appears as an injustice to Doubleday, who had displayed a marked ability in his opera 
tions of the first day. Newton, however, was one of the ablest generals in the service, and 
was well fitted for so high a command. At Mine Run, his division commanders were 
Cutler, Robinson, and Kenly. This was the last campaign of the First Corps ; for in March, 
1S64, the organization was ordered discontinued and transferred to the Fifth Corps, the brigades 
having been consolidated into two divisions, which, under Robinson and Wadsworth, became 
respectively the Second and Fourth Divisions of the Fifth Corps. 

This was an act of gross injustice, and a cruel violation of the corps pride. It was 
entirely unnecessary ; and a serious blunder, instead of an improvement on the army organi 
zation, f The men were, however, allowed to wear their old First Corps badges, a concession 
highly valued, as they had made the little flannel discs synonymous with all that was gallant 
and grand in war. 

The corps had contained some exceptionally good material. The division composed of the 
Pennsylvania Reserves had no equal in the Army as a division, while the Iron Brigade was 
famous for its hard fighting, its percentage of killed exceeding that of any other brigade in 
the Armies of the Union. 

It may be well to note that for a short time, a few weeks only, during Pope s campaign, 
General Sigel s troops were also officially designated as the First Corps ; but, it was the 
First Corps, Army of Virginia. Then, again, in November, 1864, a few months before the 
close of the war, the War Department issued orders for the formation of a new corps to be 
composed of veterans selected men who had served creditably a full term in their regi- 

*No one of these brigades was captured entire, many of the men escaping. 
1 General llunipreys: Virginia Campaign, pp. 3 and 4. 



THE SECOND Cows. C7 

monts. This corps was to l>e designated the First, with General llancock in command, 
but the war closed Iwfore a corps organization was fully effected, and Ix foro any of tho nine 
regiments thus raised wore ready for the field, leaving the gallant old First in undivided 
possession of all the laurels that clustered around that name. 

SECOND CORPS. 

SIEGE OP YORKTOWX; FAIR OAKS; OAK GROVK; ({.VISES MILL; SAVAGE STATION ; 
PEACH ORCHARD; WHITE OAK SWAMP; GLKNDALK; MAJ.VKRX HILL; ANTIKTAM ; FRKD- 

ERICKSHURG ; ClIANCELLORSVlLLE ; GKTTYSHU1W ; BuiSTOK STATION ; MlXE RUN ; MoRTOX s 

FORD; WILDERNESS; COKBIN S BRIDGE; Po RIVKR; SI-OTSYLVAXIA ; NORTH ANNA; TOTOFO- 
TOMOY ; COLD HARBOR; ASSAULT ox PETERSBURG, JUNE ISTII ; JERUSALEM ROAD; STRAW 
BERRY PLAINS; DEEP BOTTOM; REAM S STATION; POPLAR SPUING CHURCH; BOYDTON ROAD ; 
HATCHER S RUN ; SIEGE OF PETERSBURG ; WHITE OAK ROAD ; SUTHERLAND STATION ; 
SAILOR S CREEK ; FARMVILLE ; APPOMATTOX. 

The second corps was prominent hy reason of its longer and continuous service, larger 
organization, hardest fighting, and greatest number of casualties. Within its ranks w;us the 
regiment which sustained the largest percentage of loss in any one action ; also, the regiment 
which sustained the greatest numerical loss in any one action ; als"o, the regiment which 
sustained the greatest numerical loss during its term of service; while, of the one hundred 
regiments in the Union Army which lost the most men in battle, thirty-five of them l>elonged 
to the Second Corps. 

The corps was organized under General Orders No. ll, March 13, 18<>2, which assigned 
General Edwin V. Simmer to its command, and Generals Richardson, Scdgwick, and 
Blenker to the command of its divisions. Within three weeks of its organization the corps 
moved Avith McClellan s Army to the Peninsula, excepting Blenker s Division, which was 
withdrawn on March 31st from McClellan s command, and ordered to ree nforce Fremont s 
troops in Western Virginia. Blenker s Division never rejoined the corps, in fact, it had 
never really joined. The remaining two divisions, which constituted the corps, numbered 
21,500 men, of whom 18,000 were present for duty. 

The first general engagement of the corps occurred at Fair Oaks, where Simmer s prompt 
and soldierly action brought the corps on the field in time to retrieve a serious disaster, and 
change a rout into a victory. The casualties of the two divisions in that battle amounted to 
196 killed, 899 wounded, and 90 missing. In the Seven Days Battle it lost 2<>1 killed. 1.195 
wounded, and 1,024 missing. UIKHI the withdrawal of the Army from before Rkjimond, it 
moved to the support of Pope at Second Bull Run, arriving on that field in time to go into 
position at Chantilly, but was not engaged. 

The corps then marched on the Maryland campaign, during which French s (Third) 
Division was added. At Antietam the corps was prominently engaged, its casualties amount 
ing to more than double that of any other corps on the field. Out of 1 5,000 effectives, it lost 
883 killed, 3,859 wounded, and 390 missing ; total, 5, 138. Nearly one-half of these casualties 
occurred in Sedgwick s (Second) Division, in its bloody and ill-planned advance on the 
Dunker church, an affair which was under Simmer s personal direction. The Irish Brigade, 
of Richardson s (First) Division, also sustained a terrible loss in its fight at the "Bloody 
Lane," but, at the same time, inflicted a greater one on the enemy. General Richardson was 
killed in this battle, and General Sedgwick received three wounds. 

The next battle was at Fredericksburg. In the meantime Simmer had l>een promoted to 
the command of a Grand Division Second and Ninth Corps and General Darius N. Couch, 



68 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

a division commander of the Fourth Corps, was appointed to his place. General Hancock 
succeeded to the command of Richardson s (1st) Division, and General Howard took Sedg- 
wick s place, the latter being absent on account of wounds. The loss of the corps at Fred- 
ricksburg exceeded that of any other in that battle, amounting to 412 killed, 3,214 wounded, 
and 488 missing, one-half of which fell on Hancock s Division in the unsuccessful assault on 
Marye s Heights. The percentage of loss in Hancock s Division was large, Cald well s (1st) 
Brigade losing 46 per cent, killed and wounded. 

After Fredericksburg, the Grand Divisions were discontinued, and General Sumner retiring 
on account of age and physical disabilities, General Couch remained in command. Couch led 
the corps at Chancellorsville, with Hancock, Gibbon, and French as his division commanders. 
Sedgwick had been promoted to the command of the Sixth Corps, and Howard, who had 
commanded Sedgwick s Division at Fredericksburg, was promoted to the command of the 
Eleventh Corps. At Chancellorsville the principal part of the Second Corps fighting fell on 
Hancock s Division, its skirmish line, under Colonel Nelson A. Miles, distinguishing itself by 
a successful resistance to a strong attack of the enemy, making one of the most interesting 
episodes in the history of that battle. During the fighting at Chancellorsville, Gibbon s (2d) 
Division remained at Fredericksburg, where it supported Sedgwick s operations, but with 
slight loss. 

Not long after Chancellorsville, General Couch was relieved at his own request, Hancock 
succeeding to the command of the corps, and Cald well to that of Hancock s Division. While 
on the march to Gettysburg, General Alex. Hays Brigade joined, and was assigned to the 
Third Division, Hays taking command of the division. At Gettysburg, the corps was hotly 
engaged in the battles of the second and third days, encountering there the hardest fighting 
in its experience, and winning there its grandest laurels ; on the second day, in the fighting 
at the wheat-field, and on the third, in the repulse of Pickett s charge, which was directed 
against Hancock s position. The fighting was deadly in the extreme, the percentage of loss 
in the First Minnesota, Gibbon s Division, being without an equal in the records of modern 
warfare. The loss in the corps was T96 killed, 3,186 wounded and 368 missing ; a total of 
4,350 out of less than 10,500* engaged. Gibbon s Division suffered the most, the percentage 
of loss in Harrow s (1st) Brigade being unusually severe. Hancock and Gibbon were seriously 
wounded, while of the brigade commanders, Zook, Cross, Willard and Sherrill were killed. 
The monthly return of the corps, June 30, 1863, shows an aggregate of 22,336 borne on 
the rolls, but shows only 13,056 "present for duty." From the latter deduct the usual pro 
portion of non-combatants, the musicians, teamsters, cooks, servants and stragglers, and it 
becomes doubtful if the corps had over 10,000 muskets in line at Gettysburg. 

General Hancock s wounds necessitated an absence of severa, months. General William 
Hays was placed in command of the corps immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, 
retaining the command until August 12th, when he was relieved by General Gouverneur K. 
Warren, who was ordered to take Hancock s place during the latter s absence. Warren had 
distinguished himself at Gettysburg by his quick comprehension of the critical situation at 
Little Round Top, and by the energetic promptness with which he remedied the difficulty. 
He had also made a brilliant reputation in the Fifth Corps, and as the chief topographical 
officer of the Army of the Potomac. He was, subsequently, in command at Bristoe Station, 
a Second Corps affair, and one which was noticeable for the dash with which officers and men 
fought, together with the superior ability displayed by Warren himself. He also commanded 
at Mine Run and Morton s Ford, the divisions at that time being under Generals Oaldwell, 
Webb and Alex. Hays. 

Upon the reorganization of the Army of the Potomac, March 23, 1864, the Third Corps 

* 12,363 infantry, 82 cavalry and 551 artillery " present for duty, equipped." 



TUB SECOND CORPS. 60 

was discontinued, and two of its three divisions worn ordered transform! to tho Second. 
Under this arrangement the Second Corps was increased to si regiments of infantry and 10 
batteries of light artillery. The material of the old Second Corps was consolidated into two 
divisions, under Generals Barlow and Gibbon; the two divisions of tho Third Corps were 
transferred intact, and were numl>ered as the Third and Fourth, with Generals Birney and 
Mott in command. By this accession, the Second Corps attained in April, 1864, an aggregate 
strength of 46,363, with 28,854 present for duty. 

General Hancock, having partially recovered from his wounds, resumed command, and 
led his battle-scarred divisions across the Rapidan. In the battle of the Wilderness the corps 
lost 699 killed, 3,877 wounded, and 510 missing; total. 5,092, half of this loss falling on 
Birney s (Third) Division. General Alex. Hays, commanding the Second Brigade of Birney s 
Division, was among the killed. 

At Spotsylvania the Second Corps again attained a glorious place in history by Han 
cock s brilliant and successful assault on the morning of May 12th. During the lighting 
around Spotsylvania, Mott s (Fourth) Division became so depleted by casualties, and by the 
loss of several regiments whose term of service had expired, that it was discontinued and 
merged into Birney s Division, Mott retaining the command of a brigade. The casualties of 
the corps in the various actions around Spotsylvania, from May 8th to the r.th, aggregated 
894 killed, 4,947 wounded, and 801 missing; total 0,642, or over one-third of the loss in the 
entire Army of the Potomac, including the Ninth Corps. Tho heaviest loss occurred in Bar 
low s (First) Division. Up to this time the Second Corps had not lost a color nor a gun, 
although it had previously captured 44 stands of colors from the enemy. 

After more of hard and continuous fighting at the North Anna, and along the Toto- 
potomoy, the corps reached the memorable h eld of Cold Harbor. While at Spotsylvania it had 
been reenforced by a brigade of heavy artillery regiments, acting as infantry, and by the 
brigade known as the Corcoran Legion, so that at Cold Harbor it numbered 53,831, present 
and absent, with 26,900 "present for duty/ Its loss at Cold Harbor including eleven days 
in the trenches, was 494 killed, 2,442 wounded, and 574 missing ; total. 3,5 10. Birney s Division 
was but slightly engaged. 

In the assaults on the Petersburg intrenchments, June 10th -isth, the Corps is again 
credited with the largest casualty list. In one of these attacks, the First Maine Heavy 
Artillery sustained the most remarkable loss of any regimental organization, in any one 
action, during the war. At this time the corps contained 85 regiments ; its effective strength, 
however, was less than at a previous date. The corps recrossed the James, and fought at 
Deep Bottom, July 26th, and again on August 14th; then, having returned to the lines around 
Petersburg, Barlow s and Birney s Divisions were engaged at Ream s Station, on August 25th, 
a disastrous and unfortunate affair, in which it lost a large number of men captured. 

At the battle of the Boydton Road, October 27, 1864, the division commanders were 
Generals Egan and Mott, the First Division (Miles ), being retained in the trenches In Novem 
ber, 1864, General Hancock was assigned to other duty, and General Andrew A. Humphreys, 
chief of staff to the Army of the Potomac, succeeded to his position. He was in command 
during the final campaign, the divisions being under Generals Miles, William Hays and Mott. 
The corps fought its last battle at Farmville, April 7, 1S65, two days tefore Lee s surrender. 
In this final action General Thomas A. Smyth, a brigadier in Hays (2d) Division, was killed. 
Smyth was an officer with a brilliant reputation, and at one time commanded the famous Irish 
Brigade. 

The history of the Second Corps was identical with that of the Army of the Potomac:. 
It needs 110 words of praise its record was unsurpassed. 



70 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

THIED CORPS. 

SIEGE OF YORKTOWN ; WILLIAMSBURG ; FAIR OAKS ; OAK GROVE ; GLENDALE ; MALVERN 
HILL; BRISTOE STATION; MANASSAS; CHANTILLY ; FREDERICKSBURG ; CHANCELLORSVILLE ; 
GETTYSBURG ; WAPPING HEIGHTS ; KELLY S FORD ; MINE RUN. 

The Third Corps included in its organization the famous Kearny Division ; also, Hooker s 
Division, the Excelsior Brigade, the Second Jersey Brigade, and other well known commands. 
Its brilliant record is closely interwoven with the history of the Virginia campaigns of 1862 - 
63, in which it fought during two eventful years. 

It was organized March 13, 1862, with Generals Hooker, Hamilton and Fitz John Porter 
as its three division commanders, and General S. P. Heiiitzelman in command of the corps. 
It was immediately ordered to the Peninsula, Hamilton s Division embarking on the 17th, 
and leading the advance of the Army of the Potomac on that memorable campaign. During 
the siage of Yorktown the corps was at its maximum, the morning reports of April 30th 
showing an aggregate of 39,710, with 64 pieces of light artillery, and 34,633 reported as "pres 
ent for duty." But this aggregate was maintained but for a short time, as Porter s 
Division was taken away soon after to form part of the newly organized Fifth Corps. 
Hamilton was relieved on April 30th, and General Philip Kearny took his place, Hamilton 
going to the Army of the Mississippi, where he was assigned to a division command. 

Upon the evacuation of Yorktown, the Third Corps led the pursuit of the retreating 
enemy, attacking him, May 5th, at Williamsburg, with Hooker s and Kearny s Divisions. 
This battle was fought almost entirely by the Third Corps ; of the 2,239 casualties on that 
field, 2,002 occurred within its ranks ; and three-fourths of them in Hooker s Division, the 
brunt of the battle having fallen on the Excelsior Brigade and Jersey Brigade, both in Hooker s 
command. Porter s Division was not engaged, having been left at Yorktown ; on May 18th 
it was permanently detached, leaving only two divisions, Hooker s and Kearny s in the 
corps, and reducing its aggregate strength to 23,331 present and absent, with 34 pieces of 
field artillery. The two divisions numbered about 17,000 effectives, out of the 18,205 re 
ported as " present for duty." 

At Fair Oaks, its next battle, it lost 209 killed, 945 wounded and 91 missing, principally 
in Jameson s and Berry s Brigades of Kearny s Division. Five fresh regiments joined in 
June, increasing its report of June 20th to 27,474 " present and absent, " of whom 18,428 were 
reported "present for duty, equipped ;" this included eight batteries of light artillery, of 40 
guns. After deducting the large number of non-combatants and detailed men which are 
included in the " present for duty, " the corps probably numbered at this time about 17,000 
effectives, available in case of action. 

The corps made the opening fight in the Seven Days Battle, at Oak Grove, June 25th, 
fighting again at Glendale 011 the 30th, and at Malvern Hill on July 1st ; its losses in these 
engagements aggregated 158 killed, 1,021 wounded, and 794 missing; total, 1,973. The 
heaviest loss occurred in Robinson s Brigade of Kearny s Division ; the First New York, 
Berry s Brigade, also encountered a hot fire at Glendale. 

Upon the withdrawal from the front of Richmond, the Third Corps accompanied the 
Army of the Potomac to Manassas, where it was sent to reenforce Pope. The corps left 
Harrison s Bar on August 14th, and marching to Yorktown embarked on the 20th for Alexan 
dria. It arrived at Warrenton Junction on the 26th, and on the following day the Excelsior 
Brigade had a sharp fight at Bristoe Station. On the 29th, the corps was engaged at Grove- 
ton, Grover s Brigade, of Hooker s Division, having a desperate fight at the railroad embank 
ment, in which the use of bayonets and clubbed muskets was officially reported. On the 1st of 



TIIK THIRD COUPS. 71 

September, Kearny s Division was engaged at Chantilly, Birney s Brigade taking a prominent 
part ; Kearny was killed in this action. The losses of the corps at Manassas, including 
Bristoe, Groveton and Chantilly, amounted to 26o killed, 1,535 wounded and 458 missing; 
total, 2,238. Hooker s Division numbered fully 1 0,000 men at Yorktown, and received a 
reinforcement of about 3,000 more ; after Manassas, it drew rations at Fairfax Station for 
only 2,400 men. The arduous nature of its campaigns, as well as the bullets of the enemy, had 
told sadly on its numbers. 

The corps was so reduced by its losses that it was ordered into the defences of Washington 
to rest and recruit, remaining there during the Maryland campaign, and hence was not pre 
sent at Antietam. In November it joined Burnside s Army, then on its way to Frederieksburg, 
and arriving at Falmouth on the 24th, encamped there until the battle of December 13th. In 
the meantime, General Hooker had l>een promoted to the command of the Centre Grand 
Division, composed of the Third and Fifth Corps ; General George Stoneman had l>een assigned 
to the command of the Third Corps ; General Birney to that of the First Division, vice 
Kearny killed ; General Sickles to the Second Division, vice Hooker promoted ; and a third 
division, under General A. W. Whipple had been added. The corps was not prominently 
engaged at bYedericksburg, although under a heavj fire; still, its casualties amounted to it-" 
killed, S37 wounded and 202 missing; total 1,1S4, over half of which occurred in Ward s 
Brigade of Birney s Divison. After the battle the corps returned to its quarters at Falmouth, 
where it spent the winter of 1S62 - 03. General Sickles was promoted to the command of the 
corps, and General Hiram Berry to that of Sickles Division. 

On May 1, 1863, the corps broke camp and inarched to Chancellorsville, an eventful field 
in its history ; a battle in which the brunt of the fighting fell on the Third and Twelfth 
corps. It took 17,568 men, including non-combatants, on that campaign, losing 378 killed, 
2,634 wounded and 1,090 missing ; total 4,102. Generals Berry and Whipple were among the 
killed. 

The depleted ranks were still further lessened by the loss of four New York regiments 
whose two-years term of enlistment had expired ; a nine-months regiment from Pennsylvania 
had also gone home. The corps was accordingly consolidated into two divisions ; the First 
under General Birney, and the Second under General Andrew A. Humphreys, an able officer 
who had distinguished himself as a division commander at Fredericksburg. 

At Gettysburg, the corps took a prominent part in the battle of the second day, and 
although forced to fall back from its untenable position on the Eminittsburg Road, it did not 
do so until it had exacted a fearful price from its assailants. Its losses at Gettysburg were 
578 killed, 3,026 wounded, and 606 missing; total, 4,210 out of less than 10,000 actually 
engaged. The morning report showed 11,924 present for duty equipped. General Sickles 
was seriously wounded, losing a leg ; he left the corps, and General Birney succeeded temi>o- 
rarily to the command. 

In July, 1863, the corps was increased by the accession of French s Division, which had 
been in garrison at Harper s Ferry and was composed, mostly, of regiments with comparatively 
full ranks, although they had been in service several months. General French was assigned 
to the command of the corps. During the pursuit of Lee, after Gettysburg, a part of the 
corps was engaged at Wapping Heights, Va., July 23d, an action in which the Excelsior 
Brigade was prominently engaged. Another minor affair oecured at Kelly s Ford, Va., 
November 7, 1863, in which some regiments of Birney s (First) Division were under fire. 

In the Mine Run campaign a sharp fight took place at Locust Grove, Va., in which 
Carr s (3d) Division sustained considerable loss, the principal part of the casualties in that 
campaign occurring in the Third Corps. At this time General French was still in com 
mand of the corps, with Generals Birney, Prince and Carr in command of the divisions. 



72 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Upon the return from Mine Run, the corps went into winter-quarters at Brandy Station. 

On March 23, 1864, the order was issued for the discontinuance of the Third and First 
Corps. Unjust and ill-advised, it awoke a feeling of indignation and bitter resentment that 
has never been forgotten by the men. The wearers of the diamond badge gloried in the record 
of their corps ; on all occasions they proudly avowed their connection with it ; they considered 
it second to none, and gazed with pride on the historic names emblazoned on their flags. 
All this, however, counted for naught at the War Department ; the order was enforced, and 
the war-worn regiments marched away to fight under other banners ; the old corps lived 
only in the story of its deeds that nightly were recounted around the camp-fires of its 
veterans. 

The First and Second Divisions were transferred entire to the Second Corps, and, with 
Generals Birney and Mott in command, became respectively the Third and Fourth Divisions 
of that corps. The men were allowed to retain the old diamond-shaped, flannel badges on 
their caps, a prudent concession under the circumstances. 

The Third Division was transferred entire to the Sixth Corps, where, under command of 
General Ricketts, it became the Third Division of that corps. 

FOURTH CORPS. 

r 

(ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.) 

SIEGE OP YORKTOWN ; LEE S MILLS ; WILLIAMSBURG ; SEVEN PINES ; FAIR OAKS ; OAK 
GROVE ; SEVEN DAYS BATTLE ; MALVERN HILL ; ANTIETAM. 

Organized under General Orders No. 101, March 13, 1862, by which the First, Second, and 
Third Corps were also created. It was formed by the divisions of Couch, Smith, and Casey, 
with General E. D. Keyes in command of the corps. The returns for March 31, 1862, show 
that the Fourth Corps then numbered, in the aggregate, 37,910, with 60 pieces of artillery ; 
of this number, there were 32,919 present for duty. The corps moved to the Peninsula in 
March, 1862, with General McClellan s Army, taking part in the siege operations at York- 
town, and participating in the battle of Williamsburg, where it sustained a slight loss only. 

On May 18th, General Wm. F. Smith s Division was detached and assigned to the newly 
formed Sixth Corps, leaving the Fourth Corps to consist of the divisions of Generals Couch 
and Casey. After this reduction, it numbered on May 31st, 25,317 present and absent, with 
17,132 present for duty ; the artillery numbered 38 guns. 

At the battle of Seven Pines (Fair Oaks) the full force of the Confederate attack was 
directed on an advanced position held by Casey s Division, which stood its ground for an 
hour, inflicting a severe loss on the enemy, and not retiring until sufficient supports had 
arrived to save the day. Couch s Division was also hotly engaged, the losses in the corps 
aggregating 384 killed, 1,747 wounded, and 466 missing; total, 2, 597 out of less than 12,000 
engaged. Over half the loss at Fair Oaks fell on the Fourth Corps. 

During the Seven Days Battle, the corps guarded the trains during their withdrawal to 
the new base of supplies, but Couch s Division took a prominent part in the battle of Malvern 
Hill, losing over 600, killed or wounded there. 

When the army was ordered to abandon its position before Richmond, the Fourth Corps 
was divided. Couch s (1st) Division accompanied the Army of the Potomac on the Maryland 
campaign, some of the regiments becoming slightly engaged at Antietam. After that battle, 
Couch s Division was transferred, entire, to the Sixth Corps, becoming the Third Division of 
that corps, with General John Newton commanding the division. General Couch was pro 
moted to the command of the Second Corps. 



FOURTH CORIS, ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 73 

In the meantime, Peck s (2d) Division of the Fourth Corps was ordered to remain on tin- 
Peninsula, from whence it went, after a few months stay, to Suffolk, Va. The Fourth Corps 
was officially discontinued in August, 1862, and its divisions were never reunited. 



FOURTH CORPS. 
(ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.) 

MISSIONARY RIDGE ; ORCHARD KNOB ; DANDRIDGE ; DALTON ; ROCKY FACE RIDGE ; RESACA ; 
CASSVILLE ; ADAIRSVILLE ; NEW HOPE CHURCH ; PICKETT S MILLS ; KENESAW MOUNTAIN ; 
SMYRNA CAMP GROUND ; VIKING S STATION ; PEACH TREE CREEK ; SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; 
JONESBORO; LOVEJOY S STATION ; SPRING HILL ; FRANKLIN ; NASHVILLE ; OCCUPATION OF TEXAS. 

This corps was composed of fighting regiments. Of the regiments in the Western 
armies, take the ones that sustained the greatest losses in battle, and it will be found that 
more of them were in the Fourth Corps than in any other. Although all of their fighting 
was not done Avhile in the Fourth Corps, it was done either in it or in the two corps which were 
consolidated in order to form tho Fourth. 

On Octol>er 0, 183, the Fourth Corps was organized by the consolidation of the Twentieth 
(McCook s) and Twenty-first (Crittenden s) Corps, in compliance with the President s order of 
September 28th. Though newly-formed, it was composed of veteran brigades whose battle 
flags were scarred with the marks of hard fought fields ; within this new command they 
were destined to wave amid the smoke and fire of many more. The command of the Fourth 
Corps was given to General Gordon Granger, the man who marched his division to Chicka- 
mauga with no other orders or direction than " the sound of the enemy s cannon." The three 
divisions of this new corps were placed under the commands of Generals Palmer, Sheridan, 
and Wood. Soon after its organization the corps went into action at Missionary Ridge, where 
it distinguished itself by its brilliant and successful charge up the heights. In this battle the 
two divisions of Sheridan and Wood lost 280 killed, 2,078 wounded, and 12 missing; total, 
2,370, or more than half the casualties at Missionary Ridge. The first division, under com 
mand of General Cruft, was also engaged. 

During the following winter the corps marched to the relief of Knoxville, a campaign 
memorable for the suffering, hunger, and hardships endured by the men. In May, 1864, it 
moved on the Atlanta campaign, General Howard commanding the corps, and Generals 
Stanley, Newton, and Wood the divisions. Its hardest fighting during that campaign 
occurred at Pickett s Mills, and in the unsuccessful assault on Kenesaw Mountain. 

After the evacuation of Atlanta, the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps, under General 
Thomas, marched northward to confront Hood s forces, while Sherman, with the main army, 
wended his way, unmolested, to the sea. General Stanley was then in command of tin- 
Fourth Corps, General Howard having been promoted to the command of the Army of the 
Tennessee, upon the death of MacPherson; Kimball, Wagner, and Wood were in command of 
the divisions. On November 20, 18(54, a few days before the battle of Spring Hill, the corps 
numbered 14,715 present for duty; about 2,200 more joined before the battle of Franklin, in 
that battle the Confederates received the bloodiest repulse of the war, their men fighting wii 
unusual desperation, while twelve of their generals were killed or wounded in their unsuccessful 
attack on the Union intrenchments. At Franklin, Oixlycke s Brigade of the Fourth Corps 
won special distinction by its promptness and gallantry in retaking a part of the works whicl 
the enemy had seized. General Stanley was severely wounded in this action, and General 
Thomas J. Wood succeeded to his place. 



74 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

General Wood had served with honor in the armies of the Ohio, and the Cumberland, 
from the commencement of the war. He commanded the Fourth Corps in its last battle its 
last victory, at Nashville. His division generals in that engagement were Kimball, Elliott, 
and Beatty ; the casualties in the corps were 135 killed, 834 wounded and 22 missing ; total, 
991. The corps joined in the pursuit of Hood s defeated army, after which General Wood 
assembled it at Huntsville, Ala., arriving there January 5, 1865. On March 15th it moved 
into East Tennessee, in order to prevent the possible escape of Lee s and Johnston s armies, 
returning in April to Nashville, where it remained until June 16th, when it was ordered to 
New Orleans, en route for Texas. Although the war had virtually ended, the Fourth Corps 
remained in Texas during the rest of 1865, forming a part of Sheridan s Army of Occupation. 
The most of the regiments were, however, mustered out in December, 1865, in time for the 
men to spend Christmas in their homes. 

FIFTH CORPS. 

HANOVER COURT HOUSE ; MECHANICSVILLE ; GAINES MILL ; GLENDALE ; MALVERN HILL ; 
MANASSAS ; ANTIETAM ; SHEPHERDSTOWN FORD ; FREDERICKSBURG ; CHANCELLORSVILLE ; GET 
TYSBURG ; RAPPAHANNOCK STATION ; MINE RUN ; WILDERNESS ; ALSOP S FARM ; LAUREL 
HILL ; SPOTSYLVANIA ; NORTH ANNA ; TOTOPOTOMOY ; BETHESDA CHURCH ; COLD HARBOR ; 
PETERSBURG ASSAULT ; SIEGE OP PETERSBURG ; W^ELDON RAILROAD ; POPLAR SPRING 
CHURCH ; HATCHER S RUN ; DABNEY S MILLS ; GRAVELLY RUN ; WHITE OAK ROAD ; FIVE 
FORKS ; APPOMATTOX. 

The Fifth Corps was organized May 18, 1862, while the Army of the Potomac, to which 
it belonged, was engaged on the Peninsular campaign. It was formed by taking Porter s 
Division away from the Third Corps, and uniting with it Sykes Division of Regular troops, 
making a provisional corps of two divisions. This action was confirmed by the War Depart 
ment, July 22, 1862, whereupon, the term "Fifth Provisional" was dropped, and it became 
the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. Banks Corps had been officially designated as the 
Fifth Corps, in general orders No. 101, March 13, 1862, but the designation does not appear 
to have been used in connection with Banks troops. The Fifth Corps of history is the one 
which wore the Maltese Cross. 

It was permanently organized, with General Fitz John Porter as the corps commander, 
and with Generals Morell and Sykes in command of the two divisions. 

The first battle of the corps occurred at Hanover Court House, Va., May 27, 1862, an 
engagement in which MorelFs Division stood the brunt of the fighting, and won a creditable 
victory. On May 31st, the returns showed 17,546 present for duty. On June 14th its ranks 
were increased by the accession of McCalPs Division of Pennsylvania Reserves, 9,500 strong, 
which served with the Fifth Corps during the Peninsular campaign, but left it upon the return 
to Washington, the Reserves rejoining McDowell s Corps, from which they had been detached. 
The battle of Games Mill was fought, almost entirely, by the Fifth Corps and Slocum s 
Division of the Sixth, the whole under command of General Porter. His troops held their 
position stoutly, although the attacking forces comprised the entire Confederate Army, with 
the exception of Magruder s command. At Glendale, the division of Pennsylvania Reserves 
was hotly engaged, and at Malvern Hill some of Porter s regiments were again in the thickest 
of the fight. The loss of the corps in the Seven Days Battle was 995 killed, 3,805 wounded, 
and 2,801 captured or missing; totil, 7,601, or half the entire loss of the army. Of these 
casualties, 6,837 occurred at Games Mill ; the remainder at Mechanicsville, Glendale, and 
Malvern Hill. 



FIFTH TURPS. 75 

The next battle was Maoaasas (Second Bull Run), where the corps, still under command of 
General Porter, did some of the bust fighting on that field, the largest regimental loss, in killed 
and wounded, in Poj>e s entire Army at that battle, occurring in the Duryee Zouaves, one of 
Porter s regiments. The two small divisions of Morell and Sykes sustained a loss there of 
IJ31 killed, I, iit .i* \voimded, and 4f>> missing; a total of 2,151, out of about (5,500 engaged; 
Griffin s Brigade not being in action. 

At Antietam, Porter s Corps was held in reserve ; still, it Was drawn on freely during the 
day, so that Sykes Division was, almost wholly, in action. Soon after this battle a third 
division was assigned to the corps, taking the place of the Pennsylvania Reserves. This new 
division was commanded by General Humphreys, and was composed of two brigades; the 
regiments were all from Pennsylvania and were mostly nine-months men, newly recruited. 

General Daniel Buttertield commanded the corps at Frederick si mrg, and Generals Griffin. 
Sykes, and Humphreys the divisions; loss, ii(Mi killed, 1,C(JU wounded, and 300 missing; 
total, 2,175. Over half of the loss fell on Humphreys new recruits, who made a dashing 
attempt, under his personal leadership, t<> carry Marye s Heights after all other efforts had 
failed. 

General Meade succeeded Butterfield, and led the corps to Chancellorsville, where it was 
but partially engaged ; loss, 65) killed, 472 wounded, and l.V. missing. The time of the nine- 
months regiments in Humphreys Division expired soon after Chancellorsville, and that divis 
ion was necessarily discontinued ; but upon the news of Lee s invasion, in ls<>3, the Penn 
sylvania Reserves, who were then on duty in Washington, petitioned that they be allowed to 
march to the defence of their state. Accordingly, two brigades of the Reserves rejoined the 
Army of the Potomac, and were assigned to the Fifth Corps, in which they again served as the 
Third Division, this time under command of General S. W. Crawford. 

General Meade having been promoted to the command of the Army, just before the 
battle of Gettysburg, General Sykes succeeded to his place ; the divisions, were commanded at 
Gettysburg by Generals Barnes, Ayres, and Crawford. The corps distinguished itself in that 
battle by its fighting in the wheat-field, and also by the gallant action of Vincent s Brigade 
in seizing Little Round Top, just in time to save the Army from what might have been a 
serious disaster. The corps loss at Gettysburg was 3(55 killed, 1, (HI wounded, and 211 miss 
ing ; a total of 2,187, out of about 1 1,000 actually engaged. 

The regular troops of the Army of the Potomac were all in the Fifth Corps, Second 
(Ayres ) Division, and at Gettysburg these two brigades, under Colonels Day and Burbank, 
again displayed that marked efficiency which, at Games Mill and on other fields, had made 
them famous, their thinned ranks becoming again sadly depleted under the terrible fire which 

they encountered. 

General Sykes remained in command, and handled the corps on the Mine Run campaign ; 
the division generals were Bartlett, Ayres, and Crawford. 

In March, 1804, the First Corps was transferred to the Fifth, and General G Warren 
was assigned to the command. The First and Second Divisions of the Fifth Corps were 
consolidated, forming the First Division, under General Griffin, while the Third Division - 
Crawford s Pennsylvania Reserves remained unchanged ; the First Corps had l>een consoli 
dated into two divisions, prior to the transfer, which now became the Second and Fourth 
Divisions of the Fifth Corps, under command, respectively, of Generals Robinson and Wadf 
worth. Under this reorganization, the Fifth Corps contained <J7 regiments of infantry, ami 
batteries of light artillery (48 guns), numbering in all 25,695 officers and men " present 

dutv, equipped." 

General Wads worth was killed in the battle of the Wildernefi and General 
was severely wounded, losing a leg at Spotsylvania. General Cutler, of the Iron Brigade, 



76 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

succeeded to Wadsworth s command, while Eobinsoii s Division was broken up, and its regi 
ments were distributed to the other three divisions. The losses of the Fifth Corps, at the 
Wilderness, May 5th and 6th, were 487 killed, 2,817 wounded, and 1,828 missing ; total, 5,132. 
At Spotsylvania, May 8th-13th, it lost 657 killed, 3,448 wounded, and 375 missing ; total, 4,480. 

During the hard fighting and bloody assaults at Cold Harbor, the Fifth Corps was in line 
at Bethesda Church, a point oil the extreme right, where it was engaged in some sharp actions 
along the skirmish line, in which it sustained a considerable loss. It also took part in the 
assaults on Petersburg, June 18, 1864, losing 389 killed, 1,899 wounded, and 38 missing ; after 
which it took its place in the trenches preparatory to the long siege which followed. During 
the seige it was engaged, August 19th, in the battle at the Weldoii Railroad, in which a large 
number of the men were captured. In. this action the divisions were commanded by Griffin, 
Ay res, and Crawford, these officers remaining in command of their divisions until the close of 
the war. On October 27th the Corps participated in the first of the battles at Hatcher s Run 
(Boydton Road), in which it sustained a loss of 279. On February 5th, 1865, it was again 
engaged at Hatcher s Run (Dabney s Mills), with a loss of 1,319 killed, wounded, and missing. 

On March 31, 1865, just before the final campaign, the morning reports show the corps 
strength to have been 17,073, "present for duty, equipped." In the closing battles of the 
war, from March 29th to April 9th, 1865 --including Gravelly Run, White Oak Road, and 
Five Forks the casualties in the corps aggregated 2,465 in killed, wounded, and missing. 
Its last battle was fought at Five Forks, in which action the corps, still under Warren, 
captured 3,244 men, 11 flags, and 1 battery of artillery. The war having ended, the organiza 
tion was discontinued, June 28, 1865. 

SIXTH CORPS. 

WEST POINT ; GAINES MILL ; GOLDING S FARM ; GARNETT S FARM ; SAVAGE STATION ; 
WHITE OAK SWAMP ; MALVERN HILL ; MANASSAS ; CRAMPTON S GAP ; ANTIETAM ; FREDERICKS- 
BURG ; MARYE S HEIGHTS ; SALEM CHURCH ; BANKS FORD ; GETTYSBURG ; FUNKSTOWN ; RAP- 
PAH ANNOCK STATION ; MINE RUN ; WILDERNESS ; SPOTSYLVANIA ; COLD HARBOR ; PETERSBURG ; 
MONOCACY ; FORT STEVENS ; ISLAND FORD ; STRASBURG ; WINCHESTER ; CHARLESTOWN ; OPE- 
QUON ; FISHER S HILL ; CEDAR CREEK ; FALL OP PETERSBURG ; SAILOR S CREEK ; APPOMATTOX. 

The Sixth Provisional Corps was organized May 18, 1862, by uniting Franklin s Division, 
which had just arrived on the Peninsula, with General W. F. Smith s Division, which was 
taken away from the Fourth Corps for this purpose. This provisional arrangement having 
been sanctioned by the War Department, the command received its permanent designation 
as the Sixth Army Corps. General William B. Franklin was appointed corps commander, 
and General H. W. Slocum succeeded to the command of Franklin s Division. On June 20, 
1862, the corps numbered 24,911, present and absent, with 19,405 present for duty, equipped ; 
the corps artillery numbered 40 guns. 

At Games Mill, Slocum s Division was sent to the support of General Porter, and became 
hotly engaged, losing 2,021 men out of less than 8,000 present. The Vermont brigade of 
Smith s (2nd) Division took a prominent part in the fight at Savage Station, the Fifth Ver 
mont losing 209 men in that action. The corps fought at other points during the Seven 
Days Battle, but at Malvern Hill it was held in reserve. At Manassas (Second Bull Run) it 
was partially engaged, the Jersey Brigade of Slocum s (1st) Division having a sharp fight on 
August 27th, at Bull Run Bridge, in which it lost 339 in killed, wounded and missing, Gen 
eral Taylor, the brigade commander, receiving a mortal wound. While on McClellan s 
campaign, Slocum s Division made a gallant and successful charge up the mountain s side at 



SIXTH Coiii s. 77 

Crampton s Gap, driving the enemy from a strong ]x>sition ; Slocum s loss was m killed, 
418 wounded, and two missing; total, 533. The corps was under fire again at Antietam, 
but was only partially engaged ; the third Brigade (Irwin s) of Smith s Division, took an 
active part, however, i In- Seventh Maim- ami Twentieth Ne\\ York sustaining severe losse 

Important changes in the corps now took place. It received a valuable accession by the 
transfer of Couch s Division of the Fourth Corps, which now l>ecame the Third Division of 
the Sixth, with General John Newton in command. General Franklin was promoted to the 
command of the Left Grand Division, Sixth and First Corps, and General Smith succeeded 
to the command of the corps. General Slocum s able services were acknowledged by his 
promotion to the command of the Twelfth Corps, and General W. T. Brooks succeeded Slo- 
cum in command of the First Division, while General A. P. Howe succeeded to the com 
mand of Smith s (2nd) Division. 

The next battle occurred at Fredericksburg, Dec. 18, 18(52, in which only a few regiments 
of the corps were engaged, although all were under a severe artillery lire. But the cori>s 
was engaged on the same field, May 3, 18t>3, in an action which made it famous on account 
of the brilliant display of dash and daring. When Hooker took the Army to Chancellors- 
viile he left the Sixth Corps in front of Fredericksburg, which was still held by a strong force of 
the enemy. General Sedgwick, who had succeeded to the corps command, ordered an assault 
on Marye s Heights, and that strong position which had defied the assaults of the previous 
battle, was now carried by the Sixth Corps at the point of the bayonet. The divisions of 
Newton and Howe were the ones engaged ; Brooks (1st) Division was engaged later in the 
day, at Salem Church. The corps lost in this battle, 4sr> killed, 2,<>H> wounded, and 1,485 
missing ; total 4,589. The missing ones were, for the most part, lost in the action at Salem 
Church. On the day before this battle, the corps returns showed a strength of 23,730, "present 
for duty," of whom less than 20,000 were present in action. 

The Gettysburg campaign came next, in which the divisions were commanded by Generals 
Wright, Howe, and Newton. The corps was held in reserve at Gettysburg, excepting Shaler s 
Brigade, which was sent into action as a support to the Twelfth Corps; several casualties, 
also, occurred in Eustis and Wheatou s Brigades, of Newton s Division. During the pursuit 
of Lee s Army, after Gettysburg, the Vermont Brigade was engaged in a very creditable affair 
at Funkstown, Md., where this one brigade, drawn out in a skirmish line of over a mile in 
length, alone and unassisted, repelled a determined attack of a vastly sui>erior force, which in 
massed columns charged this skirmish line repeatedly. The Vermonters sustained but slight 
loss, as they occupied a strong, natural position. 

Having returned to Virginia, the corps participated, November 7, 18(53, at Rappahannock 
Station in a successful assault on the enemy s intrenehments. In this affair there was another 
display of that dash and gallantry which was so eminently characteristic of the Sixth Corps.* 
The Sixth Maine and Fifth Wisconsin distinguished themselves particularly in this action, 
leading the storming party and carrying the works with the bayonet only. It was a brilliant 
success, resulting not only in a victory, but in the capture of a large numl>er of prisoners, 
small arms, artillery and battle fiags. 

On the Mine Run campaign the divisions were commanded by Generals Wright, Howe, 
and H. D. Terry, but were not in action to any extent. The corps went into winter-quarters 
at Brandy Station. Upon the reorganization of the Army, in March, lsH, several changes 
were made. The Third Division was broken up. Shaler s Brigade being transferred to Wright s 
(1st) Division, while the brigades of Eustis and \Vheaton were placed in the Second Division, 

At Rappahannoek Station, Captain Furlong, of the Sixth Maine, leaped over the enemy s work*, and after emptying his revolver, fought 
with a clubbed musket, swinging it round his head until he fell dead. After the battle his body was found among a pile of dead, BTeral of 
whom had been killed by the blows of a musket stock. 



78 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

the command of which was given to General Geo. W. Getty, an able officer who had served 
as a division-general in the Ninth Corps, and, also, in the Seventh Corps at theSeigeof Suffolk. 
The place of the Third Division was filled by the Third Division of the Third Corps, that 
corps having been discontinued ; the command of this division was given to General Ricketts. 
The corps now contained 49 regiments of infantry, an artillery brigade composed of 8 bat 
teries of light artillery (48 guns), and a battalion of heavy artillery acting as infantry ; number 
ing in all, 24,163, "present for duty, equipped." 

In the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania it encountered the hardest contested 
fighting of its experience. At the Wilderness, the Vermont Brigade Getty s -Division - 
lost 1,232 men out of the 2,800 effectives that crossed the Rapidan on the previous day. At 
Spotsylvania, the Jersey Brigade of Wright s Division was engaged in a deadly struggle, the 
percentage of killed in the Fifteenth New Jersey being equalled in only one instance during 
the whole war. On May 10th at Spotsylvania General Upton led a storming party of 
twelve picked regiments selected from the Sixth Corps, which carried the Confederate works 
after a hand-to-hand fight in which bayonet wounds were freely given and received.* On 
May 1 2th - - Spotsylvania the whole corps fought at the Bloody Angle, " where the fighting 
was the closest and deadliest of any recorded in the history of modern wars. General Sedg- 
wick was killed at Spotsylvania, and General Wright succeeded to the command, General 
Russell succeeding Wright in the command of the First Division. The casualties of the corps 
at the Wilderness were, 719 killed, 3,660 wounded, 65u missing ; total, 5,035 ; and at Spotsyl 
vania, 688 killed, 2,820 wounded, 534 missing ; total, 4,042. 

In the assault at Cold Harbor, June 1st, 1864, the corps sustained another severe loss, 
2,715 of its number falling, killed or wounded in that ill-advised attempt. Accompanying 
the Army to Petersburg it participated in the preliminary operations incidental to the invest 
ment of that stronghold. But its stay was of short duration, Early s invasion of Maryland 
necessitating a transfer of troops to confront him, and the heroes of Marye s Heights were 
selected for that duty. On July 6th, Ricketts (3d) Division embarked at City Point, and, 
landing at Baltimore on the 8th, marched out to meet Early. This division took part in the 
battle at Monocacy on the following day, and, although unable to defeat Early, checked his 
advance. The other two divisions embarked on the 10th and, landing at Washington, attacked 
Early, whose advance had reached Fort Stevens, within the city limits. The brunt of this 
fight fell to the lot of BidwelPs (3d) Brigade, of Getty s (3d) Division, every regimental com 
mandant in this brigade, but one, being either killed or wounded. 

The corps followed in pursuit of Early through Maryland, into Virginia, and up the 
Sheiiandoah Valley. Sheridan was placed in command of the Army of the Shenaiidoah, 
which was composed of the Sixth, Eighth, and Nineteenth Corps, and its campaign of 1864, 
in the Valley, was a memorable one by reason of the victories at Opequoii, Fisher s Hill, and 
Cedar Creek. In the latter battle occurred the famous incident of Sheridan s Ride from 
Winchester; and, in justice to the Sixth Corps, it should be noted in connection with that 
affair, that General Wright had already given Early a successful check, had made the disposi 
tions for a counter advance, and was about to move forward when Sheridan resumed command. 

* Extract from a private letter from General Upton : 

MY DEAR SIR Your letter of the 7th, enclosing extract, is received. Bayonet wounds and sabre cuts are very rare. But at Spotsyl 
vania there were plenty of bayonet wounds ; and, no picture could Rive too exalted an idea of the gallantry of the TJlst New York, 5th Maine 
and 96th Pennsylvania, as they led the assaulting column of twelve picked regiments over the formidable entrenchments which confronted 

them. * * * Sincerely your friend, E. UPTON. 

To BKAYTON G. PRIERT, Theresa, N. Y. 

* From a letter in the National Tribune, May 20, 1887 : 

UPTON S CHARGE, May 12th "J. W. Johnson, and Thomas Ilassatt, of the 121st New York, received severe bayonet wounds. 
Simon Mann, of Company G, of the same regiment, fell on the works, shot dead, but had a Rebel impaled on his bayonet." 

(Signed.) J. M. LOVEJOY, Company G, 121st New York, South Valley, N. Y. 



TUB SIXTH ( OKI S. 79 

General Russell was killed at the Opequon, and the gallant Hid well at C<nlar Crock. Tin- 
casualties of the corps at the O|>e<nion aggregated 211 killed, 1,442 wounded, and 40 missing ; 
total, 1,OM. At Cedar Creek, it lost 208 killed, 1,02S wounded, and 200 missing ; total, 2,120. 
Its total lossin the Shenandoah campaign, Aug. 22d to Oct. 2<>th. was 4,81 w, out of 12, (515 
" present for duty," in August. General Wheaton succeeded to the command of the lamented 
Russell, while General Truman Seymour was assigned to the command of the Third Division, 
in place of General Rieketts, who was seriously wounded at Cedar Creek. 

In Decemher. 1804, the Sixth Corps returned to the Petersburg trenches, built their 
winter-quarters, and went into position near the Weldon Railroad. On the 2d of April, 1S05, 
occurred the grand, final, and successful assault on the fortifications of Petersburg, in which 
the corps was assigned a prominent and important part. Then came the hot pursuit of Ijee s 
retreating veterans, during which the corps fought at Sailor s Creek. This, the last battle of 
the Sixth Corps, was marked by the same features which had so largely characterized all its 
battles, dash, hard fighting some of it with the bayonet, victory, and large captures 
of men, Hags, guns, and material. 

The history of the Sixth Corps, more than any other, is replete with fascinating interest. 
Its record is invested with more of the romance and brillancy of war. There was the 
successful assault of Marye s Heights ; the briJlant dash into tin* rifle pits at Rappahannock 
Station ; the deadly hand-to-hand lighting in the gloomy thickets of Spotsylvania ; the breath 
less interest which attaches to their lone tight at Fort Stevens, where, under the eye of the 
President, they saved the National Capital from the hand of the invader ; the victories in the 
Valley, with the dramatic incident at Cedar Creek ; and the crowning success at the storming 
of Petersburg. Over all these scenes the Greek Cross waved proudly on the banners of the 
corps, while its veteran legions wrought deeds which linked that badge with an unfading glory 
and renown. 

SEVENTH CORPS. 

(DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA.) 

DESERTED HOUSE; SIEGE OF SUFFOLK. 

This corps was organized under General Orders No. 84, War Department, dated July 22, 
1802, and was formed from the troops then under command of General .John A. Dix at Foit 
Monroe, Norfork, Portsmouth, Suffolk, and vicinity. Soon after its organization, its returns 
showed a strength of 0,574, " present for duty, equipjied," with an aggregate of 1 1,73S, " pre 
sent and absent. In April, ISC,: ,, it comprised the divisions of Corcoran, Getty, and Gurney, 
including, also, two brigades which were stationed at Yorktown, under General Keyes, and 
one brigade at Norfolk, under General Viele ; in all, 52 regiments of infantry, t> batteries of 
light artillery, and 5 battalions of cavalry. The corps return for March 31, IV-:?, showed an 
aggregate of 32,741 present and absent, with 24,127 present for duty, equip]>ed. 

Corcoran s Division was in action, January 30, 1803, in an atfair at Deserted House, Va., 
in which it lost 23 killed, los wounded, and 12 missing. Both Corcoran s and Getty s Divisions 
were engaged in the defence of Suffolk, losing 41 killed, 223 wounded, and 2 missing, the 
principal loss falling on Getty s Division. 

In July, 1863, the brigade known as the Corcoran Legion was ordered on duty in 
defences of Washington ; a part of the troops which had been engaged on the Peninsular march 
of June, 1803, were ordered to join the Army of tlu Pofconric ; other detach in nb 
made, after which the remaining troops were ordered transferred to the Eighteenth Corps, and 
the Seventh Corps was discontinued August 1st, 1803. On May 31, 180;^ 



80 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

had attained a strength of 32, 397 present for duty, with an aggregate, present and absent, 
of 43,648. Getty s Division was composed largely of veteran regiments which had served 
previously in the Ninth Corps. 

SEVENTH CORPS. 

(DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS.) 

ARKADELPHIA ; OKALONA ; ELKIN S FORD ; PRAIRIE D ANN ; Moscow; CAMDEN ; POISON 
SPRINGS ; MARKS MILLS ; JENKINS FERRY. 

As a result of the juggling with corps numbers by the Washington authorities, there 
occurs another duplication of titles. This corps was organized Jan. 6, 1864, and was formed 
by the consolidation of the troops in the Department of Arkansas. The command of the 
corps was given to Major-General Frederick Steele ; the divisions were commanded by 
Generals Salomon and Thayer, with a cavalry division attached, under General E. A. Carr. 
The corps was continued in service until the close of the war. 

The principal part of its fighting was done in Arkansas while on Steele s Expedition, 
during which a general engagement occurred at Jenkins Ferry, on the Saline Kiver. In this 
action the corps lost 64 killed, 378 wounded, and 86 missing ; total, 528. General Samuel A. 
Eice, commanding the First Brigade of Salomon s (1st) Division, was mortally wounded in this 
battle. At this time the corps was composed of 17 regiments of infantry, 5 batteries of light 
artillery, and 10 regiments of cavalry. 

EIGHTH COEPS. 

CLOYD S MOUNTAIN ; NEW MARKET ; PIEDMONT ; LYNCHBURG ; MONOCACY; ISLAND FORD ; 
CARTER S FARM ; MARTINSBURG ; HALLTOWN ; WINCHESTER ; BERRYVILLE ; OPEQUON ; FISHER S 
HILL ; CEDAR CREEK. 

These battles, which occurred between May 9th and October 19th, 1864, were fought 
wholly, or in part, by the Army of West Virginia, which was, for the most part, identical 
with the forces in the two divisions under General George Crook. These two divisions, by a 
provisional arrangement, formed a part of the Eighth Corps, and eventually came to be 
known as the corps itself. 

The Eighth Corps proper was created by General Orders No. 84, July 22, 1862, which 
designated the troops under Major-General John E. Wool as the Eighth Corps. These forces 
were stationed in Maryland, at Annapolis, Baltimore, Harper s Ferry, along the Baltimore & 
OhioE. E., east of Cumberland, and along the railroad from Harper s Ferry to Winchester, Va. 

During the summer of 1864, and, also, in Sheridan s campaigns in the Valley, the Eighth 
Corps was commanded by General George Crook ; the First Division, comprising three 
brigades, was commanded by Colonel Joseph Tboburn ; the Second Division, containing two 
brigades, was commanded by Colonel Isaac H. Duval. There were 22 regiments of infantry 
in the two divisions. Colonel Thoburn was killed at Cedar Creek, the last battle in which the 
corps participated. Colonel Duval was wounded at Opequon, whereupon Colonel Euther- 
ford B. Hayes succeeded to the command of Duval s (2d) Division. The field return of troops, 
dated September 10, 1864, shows that the Army of West Virginia Crook s two divisions - 
had only 7,507 effective men. 

At the battle of Winchester, however, July 24, 1864, Crook s command contained three 
divisions, Sullivan s, Duval s, and Mulligan s. Colonel Mulligan, the hero of Lexington, was 
killed in that battle, and his division was cut up so badly that it was consolidated into one 
brigade, which was transferred to the First Division, where it became the Third Brigade 
(Campbell s) of that division. 



THE NINTH COUPS. 81 

The corps lost about 1,200 men at Winchester ; at tho Opequon it lost 104 killed, 683 
wounded, and 7 missing a total of 794 ; at Cedar Creek it lost 48 killed, 270 wounded, and 
540 captured, or missing ; total, 858. 

General Lew. Wallace was assigned to the command of tho Eighth Corps on March 12, 
1863, and was in command at the battle of Monocacy, July !, isr.4. But that battle was 
fought chiefly by Ricketts Division of the Sixth Corps ; tho only troops of the Eighth Corps 
which were engaged, were some regiments from the Baltimore garrison, organized as the First 
Separate Brigade of the Eighth Corps, General E. B. Tyler commanding. On July llth, 
General Ord was assigned to the command of the corps, but on the 28th it WJIH restored to 
General Wallace. In December, 18(54, the First and Third Brigades of the First Division 
(Thoburn s) were transferred to the Army of the James, then near Richmond, and were 
designated as the Independent Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, General J. W. Turner 
commanding. 

The Eighth Corps proper remained in service until August 1, 18G5, when its existence 
terminated. 

NINTH CORPS. 

ROANOKE ISLAND ; NEW BERNE ; CAMDEN ; WILMINGTON ISLAND ; JAMES ISLAND ; MAN- 
ASSAS ; CHANTILLY ; SOUTH MOUNTAIN ; ANTIETAM ; FREDEKICKSBURG ; SIEGE OP VICKHBURG ; 
JACKSON ; BLUE SPRINGS ; LENOIR STATION ; CAMPBELL S STATION ; FORT SANDERS ; SIEGE OF 
KNOXVILLE ; STRAWBERRY PLAINS ; WILDERNESS ; NY RIVER ; SPOTSYLVANIA ; NORTH ANNA ; 
BETHESDA CHURCH; COLD HARBOR; ASSAULT ON PETERSBURG, JUNE I~TH; PETERSBURG 
TRENCHES ; PETERSBURG MINE ; WELDON RAILROAD ; POPLAR SPRING CHURCH ; BOYDTON 
ROAD ; HATCHER S RUN ; FORT STEDMAN ; FALL OF PETERSBURG. 

A wandering corps, whose dead lie buried in seven states. Although the official order 
designating its number was not issued until July 22, 181)2, still, the corps organization might 
properly be considered as dating back to the Burnside expedition to North Carolina, in Feb 
ruary, 1862, and to the operations about Hilton Head, S. C. ; because, the troops engaged in 
these movements were the only ones used in the formation of the corps. In July, 1862, two 
of Burnside s brigades left North Carolina and proceeded to Newport News, Va. ; at the same 
time, Stevens Division left Hilton Head and repaired to the same place. From these troops, 
thus assembled, General Burnside organized his famous Ninth Corps on July 22, 1>62, the 
command consisting of three divisions, under Generals Stevens, Reno, and Parke. 

After a short stay at Newport News the corps was ordered to ivenforce Pope, and at 
Manassas it fought its first battle as the Ninth Corps. Only the two divisions of Stevens and 
Reno were engaged in this action; they numbered 12 regiments and 2 batteries, - 
than 5,000 men, all told. General Reno was in command of both divisions, Burnsido having 
been engaged at Fredericksburg in attending to the forwarding of troops. The losses in this 
small command at Manassas amounted to 904 killed, 1,000 wounded, and 31!) missing ; total. 
1,523. Some of the regiments encountered a severe fire, the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts 
losing 234 men. General Stevens was killed at Chantilly. 

General Reno retained command of the corps on the Maryland campaign. General 
side having charge of the right wing of the Army, which was composed of the Firs 
Ninth Corps. General Willcox was appointed to the command of Stevens 
while the Second and Third Divisions were commanded, respectively, by Generals 
Rodman. During this campaign Cox s Kanawha Division was temporarily attached tot 
corps. The command had also been greatly strengthened by the accession of several n 



82 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

regiments, just organized under the recent call for troops, and its four divisions now numbered 
29 regiments, and 5 batteries, with 13,819 present for duty, including the non-combatants. 

The battle of South Mountain was fought wholly by Burnside s two corps, the Ninth 
Corps losing 157 killed, 691 wounded, and 41 missing ; total, 889. The loss in the First Corps 
was about the same. General Reno was killed in this action, upon which General Cox suc 
ceeded to his command. At Antietam the corps lost 438 killed, 1,796 wounded, and 115 
missing ; total, 2,349, out of about 8,500 in action. General Rodman was among the mortally 
wounded. In October, Cox s Division returned to West Virginia, whence it had been with 
drawn to reenforce Pope, and its brief connection with the corps terminated. This division 
had made a brilliant record by its gallant services at South Mountain and Antietam. 

Upon the departure of General Cox the command of the corps fell to General Willcox. 
General W. W. Burns was appointed to fill the vacancy thus caused in the First Division, and 
General George W. Getty was placed in command of the Third Division, formerly Rodman s. 
On November 5, 1862, General Burnside was made commander-in-chief of the Army of the 
Potomac. 

At Fredericksburg, the casualty lists indicate that the corps took into action 31 regiments 
and 5 batteries, with a loss of 111 killed, 1,067 wounded, and 152 missing ; total, 1,330. Not 
long after this battle General Sedg wick was assigned to the command of the corps, and General 
Willcox returned to the command of his division, relieving General Burns. On February 5, 
1863, Sedgwick was succeeded by General W. F. Smith, and on the 12th the corps was ordered 
to Newport News, where it was pleasantly encamped for a month. General Smith s stay with 
the corps was of short duration, for he was succeeded in the following month by General John 
G. Parke. While at Newport News, Getty s (3d) Division was detached and ordered to Suffolk, 
N. C., where it was subsequently incorporated in the Seventh Corps. It never rejoined its old 
command, although, in 1864, one of its regiments, the Fourth Rhode Island, was restored to 
the Ninth Corps. 

In the meantime, General Burnside had been assigned to the command of the Department 
of Ohio, a district which included Kentucky and East Tennessee. He obtained permission for 
the transfer of his old corps to this field of operations, and, so, on the 19th of March, 1863, 
General Parke was ordered to proceed there with his two remaining divisions, Willcox s and 
Sturgis s. Just prior to the departure from Virginia, General Sturgis was relieved, and General 
Robert B. Potter was assigned to the command of the Second Division. The Ninth Corps 
was stationed in Kentucky for two months, during which it served as an army of occupation, 
its pleasant quarters and light duty making it the most enjoyable period within its experience. 
In June it was ordered to the support of Grant, who was then besieging Vicksburg, and pro 
ceeding there promptly, it participated in the investment of that place, although not under 
fire. Upon the surrender of Vicksburg, Parke s two divisions joined the main army in its 
movement on Jackson, and became engaged in the fighting there, with a loss of 34 killed, 229 
wounded, and 28 missing ; total, 291. The First Division was then under command of General 
Thomas Welsh, General Willcox having been assigned to duty in Indiana. Although the 
Vicksburg campaign had not cost the corps the bloody tribute exacted in previous campaigns, 
still it was no less destructive of life, as disease made fearful inroads in the ranks. Among 
those who succumbed to the deadly malaria of the Vicksburg camps, was General Welsh, 
who, soon after, went home to die. 

The corps left Mississippi in August, 1863, and returned to Kentucky, where, after a short 
rest, it joined in Burnside s advance into East Tennessee, a movement which had already been 
commenced. The two divisions were now reduced to about 6,000 men. General Parke having 
been made chief of staff of the Army of the Ohio, General Robert B. Potter succeeded to the 
command of the corps, with Generals Hartrauf t and Ferrero in command of the two divisions. 



THE NINTH COUPS. *:i 

Ferrero s Division had a sharp littlo fight at Blue Springs, Tenn., October 10, 1863, and the 
whole corps was engaged, November Itith, at Campbell s Station. This was followed by the 
occupation of Knoxville and the gallant defence against Longstreet s forces, terminating, 
December 5th, in the defeat and withdrawal of the enemy. The campaign in East Tennessee 
was a memorable one by reason of the Siege of Knoxville, and the unparalleled privations 
endured by the men. General \Villcox resumed command of the corps on January 17, 184, 
relieving General Potter ; on the 2lth, Parke relieved \Villcox, who then took command of 
the Second Division. 

General Bnrnside was again assigned to duty as commander of his old corps, which 
was ordered to repair to Annapolis, Md., for reorganization. In April, the corps was assem 
bled there, and was comi>osed of the four divisions of Stevenson, Potter, Willcox, and 
Ferrero, the latter division being composed wholly of colored troops. The corps numbered 
19,331, present for duty, with 42 pieces of field artillery ; but this number was soon increased, 
the return of May 10th showing a strength of 22, 70S. In addition to the four divisions, with 
their two batteries each, there was a brigade of reserve artillery of (5 batteries, and, also, a 
provisional brigade of heavy artillerymen and dismounted cavalry. In all, there were 42 
regiments of foot, and 14 batteries of light artillery. Ferrero s Colored Division had never 
been under fire, while many of the white regiments in the corps were newly organized, or 
had served previously on garrison duty only. In the ranks of the old regiments were many 
recruits and conscripts. 

In the battle of the Wilderness the corps lost 240 killed, 1,232 wounded, Ids missing ; 
total, 1,640; and, at Spotsylvania, 48(J killed, 2, 119 wounded, 459 missing; total, 3,146; 
the heaviest loss at Spotsylvania occurring in the action of May 12th. General Stevenson 
was killed at Spotsylvania, May 10th, and Major-General Thomas L. Crittenden, formerly 
commander of the Twenty-first Corps, was assigned to the command of Stevenson s (1st) 
Division. During the Wilderness campaign, prior to the battle of the North Anna, the 
Ninth Corps was not included in the Army of the Potomac, but was a separate, independent 
command, reporting directly to General Grant. This proved to l>e a faulty arrangement, 
and, so, General Burnside, with General Parke, his chief -of -staff, waived the question of their 
superiority of rank over General Meade, in order that the corps might serve under that 
officer in the Army of the Potomac. At Burnside s suggestion, an order was issued by 
General Grant, on May 25th, incorporating the Ninth Corps with the main Army. 

On the 9th of June, while at Cold Harbor, General Crittenden was relieved at his own 
request, and General Ledlie was placed in command of the First Division. In the first 
assault on Petersburg, June 17th, the corps made a brilliant attack, Potter s Division gaining 
possession of the works ; unfortunately, the division was obliged to relinquish its foothold 
for want of proper support. The corps was engaged in a similar attempt on the following 
day, the losses in Potter s and Willcox s Divisions being unusually severe in proportion to the 
number engaged. Loss, 497 killed, 2,232 wounded, and 202 missing ; total, 2,991. 

The enemy s works proving too strong for assault, the army intrenched itself prepara 
tory to the ten months siege which followed. On June 19th, Ferrero s (4th) Division of colored 
troops rejoined the corps, having been absent during the whole of the previous campaign, 
engaged on duty at the rear. Ferrero s men were now placed in the trenches with 
three divisions. The part of the line occupied by the Ninth Corps was very near the enemy 
works, and an incessant firing was kept up during the siege, resulting in a daily loss of mei 
killed or wounded. While there was a comparative quiet in front of the other corps IK 
tions, the men of the Ninth were subjected to the terrible strain of a constant watchfulne 
and deadly exposure. The enemy seemed to l>e excited to an undue activity by the present 
of Ferrero s Colored Division. 



S-i REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

The Ninth Corps was prominently connected with the siege, by reason of the immense 
mine which was dug from within and in front of its line. This mine, which was excavated 
by the 48th Pennsylvania, of Potter s Division, was successfully exploded, but the assault 
Avhich followed was a failure. During this assault Ferrero s colored regiments went into 
action and fought well, acquitting themselves creditably ; their failure, like that of the white 
regiments in this affair, resulted from causes outside of the regiments themselves. The loss 
in the Ninth Corps at the mine, was 473 killed, 1,646 wounded, 1,356 missing ; total, 3,475. 
Immediately after this engagement, General Ledlie was relieved from command of the First 
Division, and General Julius White, of the Twenty-third Corps, was assigned to Ledlie s place. 

On the 13th of August, 1864, General Burnside was granted a leave of absence ; he never 
rejoined the corps, but was succeeded by General Parke, who remained in command until the 
close of the war. At the battle of the Weldon Railroad, August 19-21, 1864, the three divis 
ions of White, Potter, and Willcox were engaged with considerable loss, although the three 
combined numbered less than 6,000 muskets ; casualties, 60 killed, 315 wounded, and 218 
missing. By this time the divisions had become so reduced in numbers that a reorganization 
of the corps became necessary, and so the regiments in White s Division were transferred to 
the divisions of Potter and Willcox. Under this arrangement Willcox s Division was num 
bered as the First ; Potter s, as the Second ; Ferrero s colored troops were designated as the 
Third Division. But, in December, Ferrero s Division was permanently detached, and most 
of his regiments were transferred to the newly-organized Twenty-fifth Corps, which was 
composed entirely of colored troops. General Ferrero, himself, was assigned to a provisional 
command at Bermuda Hundred. 

The vacancy caused by detaching Ferrero s Division was filled by six new regiments of 
Pennsylvanians one-year men organized into a division of two brigades, the command 
of which was given to General John F. Hartranft. This division rendered gallant service at 
Fort Stedman, and Hartranft added to his laurels by the ability displayed at that critical 
juncture. 

The morning report for March 31, 1865, showed a corps strength of 18,153, "present for 
duty, equipped," and 36 pieces of light artillery. With this force the Ninth Corps entered upon 
the final campaign, taking a prominent part in the storming of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, 
which resulted in the evacuation of Richmond and the downfall of the Confederacy. The 
corps was not only among the foremost in this brilliant assault, but its flags were the first to 
wave over the public buildings of Petersburg. This was the last battle in which the corps 
participated, and on July 27, 1865, the existence of the Ninth Corps was officially terminated. 



TENTH CORPS. 

JAMES ISLAND ; POCOTALIGO ; MORRIS ISLAND ; FORT WAGNER ; OLUSTEE ; WALTHALL 
JUNCTION ; CHESTER STATION ; PROCTOR S CREEK ; DREWRY S BLUFF ; COLD HARBOR ; BER 
MUDA HUNDRED ; WARE BOTTOM CHURCH ; PETERSBURG ; STRAWBERRY PLAINS ; DEEP BOT 
TOM ; CHAFFIN S FARM ; NEW MARKET ROAD ; DARBYTOWN ROAD ; CHARLES CITY ROAD ; 
FAIR OAKS (1864); FORT FISHER; SUGAR LOAF BATTERY ; FORT ANDERSON; WILMINGTON. 

Organized under General Orders No. 123, September 3, 1862, which designated the forces 
in the Department of the South as the Tenth Army Corps, and assigned Major-General 0. 
M. Mitchelto its command. These troops were stationed principally at Hilton Head, S. C., 
and Beaufort, S. C., the order including also the troops at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Key West, Fla., 
Femandina, Fla., and St. Augustine, Fla. ; in all, 14,602, present and absent, with 10,190 



THK TKNTII (. OKI S. 85 

pi-csent for duty. There were 14 regiments of infantry, 1 of engineei-s, a battalion of cavalry, 
and the usual compliment of light batteries. 

General Mitchel died, October 30, 1802, and was succeeded by General J. M. Brannun. In 
January, 1863, General David Hunter relieved Brannnn, and assumed command of the 
department; Hunter was relieved on June 3, 1803, and General Quiney A. Gillmore was 
assigned to the command of the corps. The total, present for duty, in June, 1803, was 10*3:2!), 
including artillery and cavalry. The troops at Hilton Head were commanded by General 
Alfred H. Terry ; those on Folly Island, by General Israel Vogdes ; those at Beaufort, by 
General Rufus Saxton ; at Seabrook Island, by General T. J. Stevenson ; at St. Helena Island, 
by Colonel H. R. Guss. 

These forces were all under General Gillmore, and participated in the various operations 
about Charleston Harbor in the summer of 1803, the principal event being the bloody assault 
on Fort Wagner, July 18, 1803. This assault was made by a column of three brigades, - 
Strong s, Putnam s, and Stevenson s, the whole undor command of General Truman H. Sey 
mour. General Strong s brigade led the assault, with the 54th Massachusetts (Colored) at the 
head of his column. The attack was a failure, resulting in a loss of 240 killed, 880 wounded, 
and 389 missing ; total, 1,51"). The most of the missing were killed or wounded, but few of 
them ever returning. To this loss should be added 330 casualties, which occurred in an attack 
on Fort Wagner, July llth, a week before, an attempt made by three regiments only. Two 
of the three brigade commanders, General Strong and Colonel Putnam, were killed in the 
assault of the 18th, Putnam falling after he had effected an entrance into the fort. Steven 
son s Brigade was held mainly in reserve. 

In February, 1804, Seymour s Division, of about 7,000 men, sailed for Florida, where it 
was engaged on the 20th in the battle of Olustee, a defeat in which some of the regiments 
suffered terribly. In April, 1804, the Tenth Corps was ordered to Virginia, where it was 
placed in General Butler s Army of the James, which was composed of the Tenth and 
Eighteenth Corps. The Tenth assembled at Yorktown, Va., where it was organized into the 
three divisions of Terry, Turner, and Ames, numbering, as present for duty, 10,812 infantry, 
and 1,114 artillerymen, with 40 guns. 

The Army of the James landed at Bermuda Hundred, May 0, 1804, and a month of active 
service and bard fighting immediately commenced, the Tenth Corps losing in its operations 
around Drewry s Bluff, 374 killed, 2,475 wounded, and 8o7 missing ; total, 3,050. Butler s 
operations resulting in nothing but failures, General Grant ordered the greater part of his forces 
to the support of the Army of the Potomac. Accordingly, on the 2ith of May, General W. 
F. Smith, commanding the Eighteenth Corps, took the First (Brooks ) and Second (Martin- 
dale s) Divisions of his own corps, and the Second (Devens ) and Third (Ames ) Divisions of 
the Tenth Corps, and proceeded to Cold Harbor, where these divisions cooperated with the 
Army of the Potomac in the terrible fight ing which commenced immediately upon their arrival . 
While at Cold Harbor, these two divisions of the Tenth Corps were known as part of the 
Eighteenth Corps, forming the Third Division, under command of General Devens. Upon the 
close of the fighting at Cold Harbor, the two divisions returned by water transports to 
Bermuda Hundred, but consolidated as the Second Division. Tenth A. ( . 

On the 14th of August, the Tenth Corps, under command of General David B. Birney, 
crossed the James and became engaged with the enemy at Deep Bottom, General Terry t 
division taking a prominent part in this action. The casualties in the corps were : 213 killed, 
1,154 wounded, 311 missing ; total, 1,078. On Septemlier 2!>th, Birney crossed again with his 
corps, and fought at Chaffin s Farm, his command consisting of Terry s and Ames divisions, 
together with a brigade of colored troops, under General William Birney. Loss : 74 killed, 
587 wounded, 302 missing ; total, 003. In the unsuccessful attack on Fort Gilmer, and at 

A division of Ohio troopa - hundred^)-* men - was attached temporarily to the oori* on June 1U. 1864, n Third Division. 



86 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Newmarket heights, these colored troops displayed great gallantry. General David B. Birney 
died at Philadelphia, October 18, 1861, and was succeeded by General Terry, who was in 
command of the corps during the fighting on the Darbytown Eoad, and at the battle of Fair 
Oaks, October 27, 1864. 

On December 3, 1864, the corps was discontinued, and its regiments were assigned to the 
newly formed Twenty-fourth Corps, which was composed of the white troops from the Tenth 
and Eighteenth Corps. But immediately after this transfer, Ames Division, together with 
Abbott s Brigade of this new corps, were detached and ordered on the Fort Fisher expedition. 
After the brilliant capture of Fort Fisher by these troops, they remained in North Carolina, 
and, in March, 1865, the Tenth Corps was revived. As reorganized, it consisted of Birge s 
(1st) Division, composed of three brigades taken from Grover s Division of the Nineteenth 
Corps, then stationed at Savannah ; of Ames (2nd) Division, composed of the troops which 
fought at Fort Fisher ; of Paine s (3d) Division, colored troops ; and of Abbott s Separate 
Brigade, numbering in all 12,099 men. General Terry, who was in command at the victory 
of Fort Fisher, was placed at the head of the corps. But the war was then near its close, 
and in August, 1865, the organization was discontinued. 

ELEVENTH CORPS. 

MCDOWELL ; CROSS KEYS ; CEDAR MOUNTAIN ; FREEMAN S FORD ; SULPHUR SPRINGS ; 
MANASSAS ; CHANCELLORSVILLE ; GETTYSBURG ; WAUHATCHIE ; LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN ; MIS 
SIONARY RIDGE. 

On June 26, 1862, President Lincoln ordered that "the troops of the Mountain Depart 
ment, heretofore under command of General Fremont, shall constitute the First Army Corps, 
under the command of General Fremont." The corps thus formed was, for the most part, the 
same as the one afterwards known as the Eleventh Corps, and within a short time it was 
officially designated as such. This order of President Lincoln was included in the one con 
stituting Pope s Army of Virginia, which was formed from the three commands of Fremont, 
Banks, and McDowell. Fremont s troops had seen considerable service in Western Virginia, 
having done some hard fighting at McDowell, and at Cross Keys. General Franz Sigel 
succeeded to Fremont s command on June 29, 1862, and was in command at Manassas, where 
the corps encountered more hard fighting, losing 295 killed, 1,361 wounded, and 431 missing ; 
total, 2,087. At this time the three divisions were commanded by Generals Scheiick, Von 
Stein wehr, and Schurz ; there was, also, an independent brigade attached, under command of 
General Milroy. 

By General Orders No. 129, September 12, 1862, its designation was changed to that of 
the Eleventh, a necessary change, as McDowell s command had resumed its original title of 
the First Army Corps. During General McClellaii s Maryland campaign, and during the" fall 
of 1862, the Eleventh Corps remained in Northern Virginia, in front of Washington, occupy 
ing various important outposts in the vicinity of Centreville. In December, it marched to 
Fredericksburg in support of Burnside, but was not present at the battle, after which it went 
into winter-quarters at Stafford, Va. General Sigel having asked to be relieved, General 0. 
0. Howard was appointed in his place. 

General Howard commanded the corps at Chancellorsville, May 1-3, 1863, at which time 
it numbered 12,169 effectives, and was composed of the divisions of Generals Deveiis, Von 
Stein wehr, and Schurz. It contained 27 regiments of infantry, of which 13 were German 
regiments. The men of the Eleventh Corps were good soldiers, for the most part tried and 
veteran troops, and were in no way responsible for the disaster which befell them at Chan 
cellorsville. Their commander in that battle allowed himself to be surprised. He was not 



TllK TWELFTH C OKI S. S7 

only surprised, but he had made a very faulty disposition of his troops. The men were not 
only attacked without a warning shot, but were taken at a terrible disadvantage. Anything 
beyond a brief resistance was impossible, and they were obliged to abandon their |>ositicm as 
any other corps must have done under the same circumstances. Still, some of the brigades 
changed front under the attack, and made a gallant resistance for over an hour, seriously 
retarding the enemy s onset, after which they retired slowly and in good order. The loss of 
the corps at Chancellorsville was 217 killed, 1,218 wounded, and 1)72 captured or missing ; 
total, 2,407. 

At Gettysburg the corps was still under the command of Howard; the divisions were 
under Generals Barlow, Stein web r, and Schurx, and contained 26 regiments of infantry 
and 5 batteries. It was engaged, in company with the First Corps, in the battle of the 
first day, and, on the second day, it participated in the gallant defence of Cemetery Hill. 
On the day before the battle of Gettysburg, the corps reported 1<>,576 officers and men for 
duty; its loss in that battle was 368 killed, l,l>22 wounded, and 1,511 captured or missing; 
total, 3,801, out of less than 0,000 engaged. 

It accompanied the Army on the return to Virginia after Gettysburg, and, on August 
7th, the First Division (Schimmelfennig s) was permanently detached, having lxen ordered 
to Charleston Harbor. On the 24th of September, the Second and Third divisions (Stein- 
wehr s and Schurz ) were ordered to Tennessee, together with the Twelfth Corps. These 
two corps, numbering over 20,000 men, were transported, within a week, over 1,200 miles, 
and placed on the banks of the Tennessee River, at Bridgeport, without an accident or deten 
tion. 

During the following month, on October 2Sth, Howard s two divisions were ordered to 
the support of the Twelfth Corps, in the midnight battle at Wauhatchie, Tenn. Arriving 
there, Smith s Brigade of Steinwehr s Division charged up a steep hill in the face of the 
enemy, receiving but not returning the fire, and drove Longstreet s veterans out of their 
Entrenchments, using the bayonet alone. Some of the regiments in this affair suffered a 
severe loss, but their extraordinary gallantry won extravagant expressions of praise from 
various generals, high in rank, including General Grant. A part of the Eleventh Corps was 
also actively engaged at Missionary Ridge, where it cooperated with Sherman s forces on the 
left. After this battle it was ordered to East Tennessee for the relief of Knoxville, a cam 
paign whose hardships and privations exceeded anything within the previous experience of 
the command. 

In April, 1864, the two divisions of the Eleventh Corps were broken up .and transferred 
to the newly-formed Twentieth Corps. General Howard was transferred to the command of 
the Fourth Corps, and, subsequently, was honored by a promotion to the command of the 
Army of the Tennessee. 

TWELFTH CORPS. 

WINCHESTER ; PORT REPUBLIC ; CEDAR MOUNTAIN : MANASSAS : ANTIETAM ; CHAN 
CELLORSVILLE ; GETTYSBURG ; WAUHATCHIE ; LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN ; MISSIONARY RIDGE ; RING- 
GOLD. 

The corps that never lost a color or a gun. When its designation was changed to the 
Twentieth, it still preserved unbroken the same grand record. The veteran divisions of 
Williams and Geary wore their star-badges through all the bloody battles of the Atlanta 
campaign and the Carolinas, and still kept their proud claim good, marching northward 
to the grand review with the same banners that had waved at Antietam and Lookout 



88 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Mountain ; -with the same cannon which had thundered on the battle-fields of seven states. 
None were missing.. 

The organization of the Twelfth Corps may be considered as dating from the General 
Order of March 13, 1862, under which the corps formation of the Army of the Potomac was 
first created. By that order, five different corps were constituted, one of which, composed 
of the divisions of Williams and Shields, and commanded by General Banks, was designated 
as the Fifth. These divisions were then operating in the Shenandoah Valley. On the 26th 
of June, the President ordered that "the troops of the Shenandoah Department, now under 
General Banks, shall constitute the Second Army Corps" of the Army of Virginia. On 
September 12th, General Order 129, it was ordered that its designation be changed to that of 
the Twelfth Corps, and that General Joseph K. Mansfield be placed in command. 

In the meantime the corps had done considerable hard fighting under its former title. 
Shields Division won a brilliant victory over Stonewall Jackson at Kernstown, Va. , on the 
23d of March, and Williams Division fought well at Winchester, May 25th, while oil Banks 
retreat. The battle of Cedar Mountain was also fought by this corps, alone and unassisted ; 
and, although defeated by the overwhelming force of the enemy, the record shows that the 
two divisions did there some of the best fighting of the War. In that battle the divisions 
were commanded by Generals Williams and Augur ; loss, 302 killed, 1,320 wounded, and 594 
missing ; total, 2,216, out of less than 6,000 engaged. This loss fell on four brigades, Craw 
ford s Brigade losing 867 men out of 1679, reported by Crawford as "present in engagement." 
At Manassas the corps was held in reserve. 

It participated in the Antietam campaign under its proper designation, as the Twelfth 
Corps, with the veteran Mansfield in command. Its division and brigade organization was 
the same as at Cedar Mountain ; General George S. Greene had succeeded General Augur in 
the command of the Second Division. Its depleted columns had been strengthened by the 
accession of five new regiments of volunteers, fresh from the North, three of which were 
composed of Pennsylvanians, enlisted for nine mouths only. The corps now numbered 12,300 
present for duty, including the non-combatants ; it contained 22 regiments of infantry, and 3 
batteries of light artillery. It was the smallest corps in the Army. 

It was not engaged at South Mountain, although it marched thither in plain view of the 
battle which was raging on the mountain s side, ahead of its dusty columns. At Antietam, 
it entered the fight early in the morning, and carried a position near, and in front of, the 
Dunker Church. General Mansfield fell, mortally wounded, while deploying his columns, and 
the command of the corps during the battle devolved on General Williams. The two divisions 
lost in this battle, 275 killed, 1,386 wounded, and 85 missing ; total, 1,746, out of about 8,000 
present in action. 

The vacancy caused by the death of General Mansfield was filled by the appointment of 
Major-General Henry W. Slocum, a division general of the Sixth Corps, who had already 
achieved a brilliant reputation by his services on the Peninsula, and at the successful storming 
of Crampton s Gap. The Twelfth Corps remained in the vicinity of Harper s Ferry until 
December, when it moved into Virginia, and made its winter-quarters at Stafford Court House. 

The brunt of the battle of Chancellorsville fell on the Third and Twelfth Corps ; and yet 
amid all the rout and confusion of that disastrous battle the regiments of the Twelfth Corps 
moved steadily with unbroken fronts, retiring at the close of the battle without the loss of a 
color, while the corps artillery, after having been engaged in the close fighting at the Chan 
cellor House, withdrew in good order, taking every gun with them. In this campaign 
Slocum s troops were the first to cross the Rapidan, and the last to re-cross the Rappahannock. 
The corps at this time contained 30 regiments of infantry, with 5 batteries of light artillery, 
numbering in all 12,929 present for duty, Its losses at Chancellorsville amounted to 260 



THK TWELFTH COUPS. -: 

killed, MM wounded, and 1,118 missing; total, 2,814. The hardest fighting and heaviest 
losses fell on Ruger s and Candy s brigades. The divisions were commanded by Generals 
Williams and Geary. 

At Gettysburg, the Twelfth Corps distinguished itself by its gallant defence of Culp s 
Hill. At one time during the battle, the corps having been ordered to reenforee a distant part 
of the line, Greene s Brigade, of Geary s Division, was left behind to hold this important 
point. While occupying this position on Culp s Hill, with no other troops in support, Greene 
was attacked by Johnson s Division, but the attack was successfully repulsed. The details of 
this particular action form an interesting chapter in the history of the war. Still, some of 
Johnson s troops effected, without opposition, a lodgment in the vacated breastworks of the 
Twelfth Corps, and upon the return of those troops a desperate battle ensued to drive tho 
Confederates out. After a long, hard tight the corps succeeded in re-occupying its works. 
On no part of the field did the Confederate dead lie thicker than in front of the Twelfth Corps 
position. Johnson s Division, containing 22 regiments, lost in this particular action, 221 killed, 
1,269 wounded, and 375 missing ; total, 1,873.* To this must be added whatever loss occurred 
in Smith s, Daniel s, and O Xeil s brigade, containing 14 regiments, which were sent to 
Johnson s support. The Twelfth Corps, containing 28 regiments, lost 204 killed, 810 wounded, 
and G7 missing ; total, 1,081. General Slocum was in command of the right wing at Gettys 
burg, which left General A. S. Williams, of the First Division, in command of the corps ; 
General Thos. H. Ruger of the Third Brigade, First Division, took Williams place as com 
mander of the "Red Star* Division ; -General Geary commanded the "White Star," or Second 
Division. 

The Army followed Lee into Virginia, the Twelfth Corps joining in the pursuit, and 
pushing forward until it reached the Rappahannock. While encamped there, on the 23d of 
September, 1863, the Eleventh and Twelfth corps were detached from the Army of the 
Potomac and ordered to Tennessee as a reinforcement for Rosecrans. The two corps were 
placed under command of General Hooker. Arriving in Tennessee, Geary s Division moved 
to the front, while Williams Division was stationed along the railroad from Murfreesboro to 
Biidgeport. Geary pushed on in order to effect a junction with the beleaguered army at 
Chattanooga. On the night of Oct. 27th, his division, the " White Stars," bivouacked in Look 
out Valley, in an advanced and isolated position, where he was attacked at midnight by a 
part of Longstreet s command. But Geary had taken proper precautions against surprise, 
and the enemy were defeated, Geary receiving in this affair a prompt and gallant support 
from part of the Eleventh Corps. General Thomas, commanding the Army of the Cumber 
land, stated in his official report that "the repulse by Geary s Division of greatly superior 
numbers who attempted to surprise him, will rank among the most distinguished feats of 
arms of this war." 

The midnight battle of Wauhatchie was followed in the next month by the brilliant 
victory at Lookout Mountain, where the " White Star" Division fought its famous battle above 
the clouds. Geary was assisted in this engagement by Whitaker s Brigade, of the Fourth 
Corps, one of Whitaker s regiments, the Eighth Kentucky, being the first to plant its flag 
on the summit of the mountain. 

In April, 1804, the designation of the corps was changed to that of the Twentieth. 
Generals Williams and Geary still retained command of their divisions, and the men still 
wore their Twelfth Corps badge. This badge (the star) was adopted by the reorganized 
corps. The new organization was formed by the consolidation of the Eleventh and Twelfth 
corps, to which was added some minor commands. The action of the War Department in 



* I ickutfs Division l,m 233 kille 1, 1.157 wounded, aii.l 1.499 captured or niLalug. (Official Keport.) 



90 KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

striking out the Twelfth Corps number was stupid, unnecessary, and unjust. If done out 
of consideration for the Eleventh, it was a mistake ; for the men of that corps expressed 
themselves freely that, their own divisions having been broken up, they would have gladly 
taken the Twelfth Corps title as well as its honored badge. They knew that corps ; they had 
fought by its side. They knew nothing of the Twentieth. 

Upon the discontinuance of the Twelfth Corps, General Slocum was assigned to the 
command of the District of Vicksburg, but resumed the corps command of the Twentieth 
Corps during the Atlanta campaign, General Hooker having been relieved. Slocum after 
wards commanded the Army of Georgia while on the March to the Sea, and in the battles of 
the Carolinas. He was, pre-eminently, one of the ablest generals of the war ; he made no 
mistakes ; wherever he was in command, everything went well. His troops had unbounded 
confidence in his ability, and always went into action with perfect confidence ; they felt that 
with him, there would be no surprise, no rout, no defeat. 

The Twelfth Corps was small, but was composed of excellent material. Among its 
regiments were the Second Massachusetts, Seventh Ohio, Fifth Connecticut, One Hundred 
and Seventh New York, Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania, Third Wisconsin, and others equally 
famous as crack regiments ; all of them with names familiar as household words in the 
communities from which they were recruited. 

THIRTEENTH CORPS. 

CHICK AS AW BLUFFS ; ARKANSAS POST ; PORT GIBSON (MAGNOLIA HILLS) ; CHAMPION S 
HILL ; BIG BLACK RIVER BRIDGE ; VICKSBURG ASSAULT, MAY 19TH ; VICKSBURG ASSAULT, 
MAY 22ND ; SIEGE OF VICKSBURG ; SIEGE OF JACKSON ; HELENA ; GRAND COTEAU ; CANE 
RIVER ; CLOUTIERSVILLE ; SABINE CROSS ROADS ; SPANISH FORT ; FORT BLAKELY. 

The Thirteenth and Fourteenth corps were the first ones organized in the Western armies. 
They were created on the same date, October 24, 1862, by General Order No. 108, War Depart 
ment, which ordered that "the troops under the command of Major-General Grant will 
constitute the Thirteenth Army Corps." As these troops included the whole Army of the 
Tennessee, it became necessary to subdivide the corps, which was done December 18, 1862, and 
four organizations, the Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth corps were accord 
ingly formed, with General John A. McClernand in command of the Thirteenth. In the 
meantime, General Sherman, with a portion of the Thirteenth Corps, the right wing, 
embarked at Memphis 011 the Yazoo Expedition, during w^hich he made an unsuccessful 
assault on the outer works of Vicksburg, at Chickasa vv Bluffs. Loss, 208 killed, 1, 005 wounded, 
and 563 missing; total, 1,776, out of 33 regiments engaged. The forces consisted of the 
divisions of Generals A. J. Smith, Morgan L. Smith, George W. Morgan, and Frederick 
Steele, numbering 30,075 men. The regiments, with a few exceptions, were under fire for 
the first time. There was some close fighting done; "the flag of the Sixteenth Ohio was 
shot to tatters, only shreds remaining on the staff ; and the flag of the Twenty-second 
Kentucky was scarcely less torn, and not less dripping with blood." - [Official Report.] 

In January, McClernand moved on an expedition against Arkansas Post, taking with him 
the Thirteenth and Fifteenth corps. He styled his forces, "the Army of the Mississippi," and 
designated them as the First and Second corps of the same. He placed General Morgan in 
temporary command of his own corps - - the Thirteenth ; General Sherman was in command 
of the Fifteenth. The Confederate works at Arkansas Post were carried by storm, the losses 
in the Thirteenth Corps amounting to 48 killed, 307 wounded, and 18 missing ; total, 463, the 
bulk of which fell on Burbridge s Brigade of A. J. Smith s Division. Only two divisions 



THF, THIKTKKXTH CORPS. 91 

of the Thirteenth Corps A. J. Smith s and Osterhaus -- participated in this expedition. 

Upon the opening of the campaign against Vicksburg, May 1, 1863, the Thirteenth Corps 
was composed of the four divisions of Osterhans, A. J. Smith, Hovey, and Carr ; these were 
also known, respectively, as the Ninth, Tenth, Twelfth, and Fourteenth Divisions, having 
l>een numbered thus while in the Army of the Tennessee. The corps, as thus comjiosed, con 
tained 40 regiments of infantry, 1 1 hatteries of light artillery, and 6 companies of cavalry ; 
numbering in all 32,648, present and absent, with is, 245 present for duty. To this should he 
added Ross s (13th) Division, stationed in Arkansas, which also belonged to the Thirteenth 
Corps, but which did not take part in the Vicksburg campaign. This division fought the 
battle of Helena, Ark , July 4, 1863. 

The battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, was fought almost entirely by the Thirteenth 
Corps, its losses in that action aggregating 1*25 killed, 07* wounded, and 23 missing ; total, 
826. The battle of Champion s Hill was fought by the Thirteenth and Seventeenth Corps, 
the former losing 231 killed, 987 wounded, and 145 missing; total, 1,363. The fighting at 
the Big Black River Bridge was a brilliant affair, in which the Thirteenth Corps alone par 
ticipated ; loss, 3D killed, 237 wounded, and 3 missing ; total, 270, the bulk of which occurred 
in Lawler s Brigade of Carr s Division. In the first assault on Vicksburg, May 19th, the 
corps sustained a slight loss only; but in the grand assault of May 22d it suffered severely, 
losing 202 killed, 1,004 wounded, and 60 missing; total, 1,275. During the first twenty-two 
days of the Vicksburg campaign, the corps lost 3,893 men in action, which was supplemented 
during the siege by heavy losses in the trenches. 

General McClernand was relieved from command on June 10th, by order of General 
Grant, and General E. O. Ord was appointed in his place. Grant was displeased with the 
tone and character of a congratulatory order issued by McClernand to his troops, and as 
McClernand declined to amend it he was relieved. After tho capitulation of Vicksburg the 
Thirteenth Corps, under General Ord, moved with the Army to Jackson, Miss., and assisted 
in the investment of that place. Carr s Division at this time was commanded by General 
William P. Benton. In the operations about Jackson tin; corps lost 85 killed, 501 wounded, 
and 165 missing: total, 751. This includes the loss in Lauman s Division, of the Sixteenth 
Corps, which was temporarily attached to the Thirteenth. 

Upon the evacuation of Jackson and retreat of the enemy, the corps returned to Vicksburg, 
and in the following month (August, 1863) moved on transports down the Mississippi to New 
Orleans. The troops were assigned to duty at various places in the Department of the Gulf, 
-in Texas and Louisiana. General Osterhaus was succeeded in command of his division by 
General C. C. Washburn. The Third and Fourth Divisions fought at Grand Coteau, La., 
November 3, 1863. The winter of 1863-4 was spent in the vicinity of New Orleans and the 
Lower Mississippi, a part of the corps being stationed in Texas. Corps headquarters were in 
Texas, but were moved to Alexandria, La., on the 18th of April, as the Third and Fourth 
Divisions had accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General 
McClernand was again in command of the corps ; the Third Division was commanded by 
General Cameron, and the Fourth, by General Landram. Tho First and Second Divisions 
remained in Texas during the Red River Expedition, excepting Lawler s (2d) Brigade, of the 
First Division, which joined Banks Army about the 20th of April. The Third and Fourth 
Divisions of the Thirteenth Corps were actively engaged at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, 
La., April 8, 1864, in which they sustained considerable loss. They were also engaged at Cane 
River, and at Clout iersville, La. 

The corps organization was discontinued, June 11, 1SU4, and the troops transferred to 
other commands. It was reorganized, Feb. 18, 1865, and Major-General Gordon Granger, of 
Chickamauga fame, was placed in command ; the divisions were commanded by Generals 



92 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Veatch, Andrews, and Benton. The corps proceeded to Mobile, and it participated in the 
investment of that city, and in the storming of Fort Blakely, April 9, 1865, which was the 
last general engagement of the war. 

The Thirteenth Corps then moved to Selma, Ala., and thence to Galveston, Texas. Its 
existence terminated officially on the 20th of July, 1865. The men of the Thirteenth never 
wore any corps badge ; neither was there any badge designated in official orders for their 
use. 

FOURTEENTH CORPS. 

CHAPLIN HILLS ; KNOB GAP ; STONE S RIVER ; HOOVER S GAP ; CHICKAMAUGA ; MISSIONARY 
RIDGE ; BUZZARD ROOST ; TUNNEL HILL ; RESACA ; ROME ; NEW HOPE CHURCH ; KENESAW 
MOUNTAIN ; PEACH TREE CREEK ; UTOY CREEK ; SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; JONESBORO ; LOVEJOY S 
STATION ; SHERMAN S MARCH ; SIEGE OF SAVANNAH ; AVERASBORO ; BENTONVILLE. 

The Fourteenth Corps was constituted under General Orders No. 168, Oct. 24, 1862, 
which directed that the troops in the Army of the Cumberland should be designated as the 
Fourteenth Corps, and that General Rosecrans be placed in command. These forces had 
hitherto been styled the Army of the Ohio, and had been under the command of General 
Buell. It had fought under him at Shiloh, and at Chaplin Hills, the latter battle occurring 
October 8th, just prior to the order designating this army as the Fourteenth Corps. At the 
time of the battle of Chaplin Hills, the Army of the Ohio had been divided, by order of Gen 
eral Buell, into the First, Second, and Third Corps, commanded respectively by Major- Gener 
als McCook, Crittenden and Gilbert. Its losses at Chaplin Hills or Perry ville aggregated 
845 killed, 2,851 wounded, and 515 missing ; total, 4.211. Over three-fourths of these casual 
ties occurred in McCook s Corps, the loss in some of his regiments being unusually large. 

The Fourteenth Corps, at the time when it was first designated as such, embraced twelve 
divisions, containing 155 regiments of infantry, 1 regiment of engineers, 35 batteries of light 
artillery, and 6 regiments of cavalry. There are no returns showing its numerical strength 
at this time ; but, a return in December, 1862, shows an aggregate of 123,402, present and 
absent, with 66,T95 present for duty.* 

Like the Thirteenth Corps, which was also constituted by General Order 168, the Four 
teenth embraced an entire army ; and hence, like the Thirteenth, some further subdivision 
became necessary. On November 7th, General Rosecrans ordered that the corps be divided 
into the right wing, centre, and left wing, to the command of which Major-Generals McCook, 
Thomas, and Crittendeii were respectively assigned. The centre contained five divisions, 
while the right and left wings contained three divisions each. Three of the centre divisions 
were detached by General Rosecrans to protect his line of communications, and so the Four 
teenth Corps took 8 divisions into action at Stone s River. The centre, under Thomas, was 
composed of Rousseau s and Negley s Divisions ; the right wing, under McCook, of Davis , 
Johnson s, and Sheridan s Divisions ; the left wing, under Crittenden, of Wood s, Palmer s, 
and Van Cleve s Divisions. Walker s Brigade of the Third Division, centre, was also present 
at Stone s River. These troops numbered 43,400 present for duty ; the loss in that battle 
amounted to 1,730 killed, 7,802 wounded, and 3,717 captured or missing ; total, 13,249. Over 
25 per cent, were killed or wounded. 

By authority of the War Department General Order No. 9 January 9, 1863, the right 
wing, centre, and left wing of the Fourteenth Corps were designated respectively as the 
Twentieth, Fourteenth and Twenty-first Army Corps, the commanding officers remaining 

*Official Records, Vol. xx, Part ii, p. 285. 



THE FOURTEENTH COKPS. 03 

unchanged. As before, these three corps constituted the Army of the Cumberland. From this 
time on, the history of the Fourteenth Corps is limited to the movements of the particular 
divisions under command of General Thomas. After the battle of Stone s River, Rosecrans 
advanced his army to Murfreesboro, and encamped there. On June 23, 1803, orders were issued 
for another advance, during which the Fourteenth Corps was engaged in the fighting at 
Hoover s Gap, June 24 - 25. It was then composed of the four divisions of Rousseau, Negley, 
Brannan, and Reynolds. Its losses at Hoover s Gap amounted to 27 killed, 177 wounded, and 
2 missing; total, 200. 

Pushing on across the Cumberland Mountains in pursuit of Bragg, the Fourteenth was 
next engaged at Chickamauga. General Baird had succeeded Rousseau in command of the 
First Division. The four divisions then contained 51 regiments of infantry, and 12 batteries 
of light artillery. In the First Division was the Brigade of Regulars which had distinguished 
itself by its gallantry and good fighting at Stone s River. The Fourteenth Corps numl>ered 
19,920 at Chickamauga ; it lost there 004 killed, 3,555 wounded, and 1,1)25 missing ; total, 0,144. 

In pursuance of an order from the President, dated Sept. 2S, 1803, the Army of the 
Cumberland was reorganized. General Thomas succeeded Rosecrans, and Major-General 
John M. Palmer was placed in command of the Fourteenth Corps. Under this reorganization 
the corps contained three divisions, Johnson s, Davis and Baird s, and each division con 
tained three brigades. Some of the brigades contained nine regiments ; but the regiments 
were small, and many of them sadly depleted. The corps roster on Oct. 20, 1803, showed 04 
regiments of infantry, and 9 batteries of light artillery. The corps fought at Missionary 
Ridge, Nov. 25, 1803, where it lost 140 killed, 787 wounded, and 14 missing; total, 941. In 
February, 18(54, it was engaged in a sharp reconnoissance at Dalton, Ga. 

On May 5, 1804, it moved with Sherman s Army on the advance which was to culminate 
in the possession of Atlanta. The Fourteenth Corps took part in the opening battle of this 
campaign at Resaca, and was prominently engaged in the final victory at Jonesboro. During 
the intervening four months it was actively engaged in the continuous marching and fighting 
which was so characteristic of that brilliant campaign. In August, while on the Atlanta 
campaign, General Palmer, the corps commander, was relieved upon his own request, and 
General Jefferson C. Davis, the commander of the Second Division, was appointed by the 
President to take Palmer s place. General James D. Morgan succeeded to the command of 
the Second Division. During the four months of the Atlanta campaign, the Army of the 
Cumberland --then composed of the Fourth, Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps-- lost 3,041 
killed, 15,783 wounded, and 2,7o7 missing ; total, 21,531. Of these casualties fully one-third 
occurred in the Fourteenth Corps. To this total must be added the heavy losses of the Army 
of the Tennessee, and the Army of the Ohio, in order to understand the extent of the fight 
ing while on that campaign. 

After a short rest at Atlanta, and a short campaign in pursuit of Hood, the Fourteenth 
Corps moved with Sherman s Army, Nov. 15, 1804, on its march to the sea, the three divis 
ions of the corps being under command of Generals Carlin, Morgan and Baird, and num 
bering 13,902 present for duty. The march through Georgia to the sea was an uneventful one, 
and no fighting occurred. Savannah was occupied Deceml>er 20th, and in February, 1805, 
Sherman started on his march through the Carolinas. The Fourteenth Corps, together with 
the Twentieth, formed the Army of Georgia, General Slocum commanding both corps. On 
entering the Carolina campaign, February 1, 1805, the Fourteenth reported its strength at 
14, 420, infantry and artillery, and contained 47 regiments of infantry, with 4 batteries of light 
artillery. The battle of Bentonville, N. C., occurred March 19, 1805, while on this campaign. 
It was a hard fought battle, in which the divisions of Carlin and Morgan, assisted by two 
brigades from Williams (Twentieth) Corps, did most all the fighting. This was the last hat- 



94 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL 

tie in which the corps participated, and the veteran columns marched gayly on to the final 
review at Washington. The organization was ordered discontinued August 1, 1865. 

FIFTEENTH CORPS. 

CHICKASAW BLUFFS ; ARKANSAS POST ; DEER CREEK ; BLACK BAYOU ; SNYDER S BLUFF ; 
JACKSON ; ASSAULT ON VICKSBURG, MAY 19TH ; ASSAULT ON VICKSBURG, MAY 22ND ; VICKS- 
BURG TRENCHES ; CLINTON ; JACKSON ; BRANDON ; CHEROKEE ; TUSCUMBIA ; LOOKOUT MOUN 
TAIN ; MISSIONARY RIDGE ; RINGGOLD ; RESACA ; DALLAS ; BIG SHANTY ; KENESAW MOUN 
TAIN ; NICKAJACK CREEK ; BATTLE OF ATLANTA ; EZRA CHURCH ; JONESBORO ; LOVEJOY S 
STATION ; SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; ALLATOONA PASS ; TAYLOR S RIDGE ; GRISWOLDVILLE ; FORT 
MCALLISTER ; RIVER S BRIDGE ; CONGAREE CREEK ; COLUMBIA ; LYNCH CREEK ; BENTONVILLE. 

The Fifteenth Corps was one of the organizations resulting from the partition of the 
Thirteenth Corps, December 18, 1862. General William T. Sherman was assigned to its 
command. Part of the Fifteenth Corps the divisions of Generals Steele and Morgan L. 
Smith, together with other troops were engaged under Sherman at Chickasaw Bluffs in the 
first attempt on Vicksburg. These two divisions lost in that action, 144 killed, 579 wounded, 
and 189 missing ; total, 912. The entire loss of the Army at Chickasaw Bluffs was 1,776. 

A few day slater these two divisions accompanied McClernand s expedition to Arkansas 
Post, a successful affair which resulted in the capture of that place. General Sherman was 
present with these two divisions of his corps ; General M. L. Smith having been severely 
wounded at Chickasaw Bluffs, his division was commanded at Arkansas Post by General 
David Stuart. The loss of the Fifteenth Corps in this affair was 86 killed, 501 wounded, and 
11 missing ; total, 598. The loss of the entire Army was 1,001. 

During the spring of 1863 the corps participated in the Bayou expeditions about Vicks 
burg, preceding the campaign in the rear of that city. On that campaign the corps was 
composed of the three divisions of Steele, Blair, and Tuttle, numbered respectively as the 
First, Second, and Third Divisions ; they were previously known as the Eleventh, Fifth, and 
Eighth, of the Army of the Tennessee. These three divisions contained 41 regiments of 
infantry, 7 batteries of light artillery (36 guns), and 5 companies of cavalry, numbering in all, 
15,975 present for duty, out of 19,238 present in the aggregate. Present and absent, it 
numbered 27,416 men. 

Of the series of battles in the rear of Vicksburg, the battle of Jackson, May 14, was the 
only one in which the Fifteenth Corps took part. In that action Tuttle s Division was slightly 
engaged, losing 6 killed, 22 wounded, and 4 missing. The corps was engaged, next, in the 
investment of Vicksburg. In the assault of May 19th, it lost 134 killed, 571 wounded, and 8 
missing ; total, 713. In this assault the Fifteenth sustained the principal loss, the total of the 
casualties amounting to 942. In the general assault which occured three days later - - May 
22d--the corps lost 150 killed, 666 wounded, and 42 missing ; total, 858. After the surren 
der of Vicksburg, the Army moved on Jackson and invested, that place, the corps losing- 
there, July 10-1 6th, 10 killed, 32 wounded, and 38 missing. During the latter movement 
the First Division was commanded by General John M. Thayer. 

After the evacuation of Jackson by the enemy, the Army returned to Vicksburg and its 
vicinity, the Fifteenth Corps encamping there until the latter part of September, when it 
moved to Memphis. The Third Division (Tuttle s) was left behind at Vicksburg, and it never 
rejoined the corps. Its place was taken by John E. Smith s Division (formerly Quinby s), 
Seventeenth Corps, which joined at Memphis and remained permanently attached, as the 
Third Division. William S. Smith s Division was detached from the Sixteenth Corps, in 



THE FIFTEENTH CORPS. ... 

September, and was also added to the Fifteenth Corps, becoming the Fourth Division. The 
four divisions having been concentrated at Memphis, moved thence to Chattanooga, where 
they participated in the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, November 23- 
25, 1863. General Frank P. Blair was in command of the corps, General Sherman having 
been promoted, October 27, 1803, to the command of the three corps composing the Army <rf 
the Tennessee. The four divisions of the Fifteenth Corps were commanded at Missionary 
Ridge by Generals Osterhaus, Morgan L. Smith, John E. Smith,*and Hugh Ewing. The 
losses of the corps in that battle, and in the minor actions connected with it, aggregated 295 
killed, 1,402 wounded, and 292 missing; total 1,989. After this battle the corps marched to 
the relief of Knoxville, arriving there December 0, 1803, two days after Longstreet s retreat. 
The corps then returned to Chattanooga, moving thence into Northern Alabama, where it 
went into winter quarters. 

Under command of General Logan, it was actively engaged on the Atlanta campaign of 
1864 ; its division commanders were Generals Osterhaus, Morgan L. Smith, John E. Smith, 
and Harrow. The Third Division (John E. Smith s) garrisoned points on Sherman s line of 
communication, and so was not present with the advancing columns. After the fall of 
Atlanta, Harrow s (4th) Division was consolidated with the others, and its place was taken by 
Corse s Division of the Sixteenth Corps. General Corse, with a provisional command from 
the Fifteenth Corps, made the famous defense of Allatoona Pass, an affair remarkable for 
the courageous, desperate fighting of commander, officers and men. 

On the 12th of November, 1804, the corps started with Sherman s Army on the march 
through Georgia to the sea. General Logan being absent, the corps was under the command 
of General Osterhaus ; the four divisions were commanded by Generals C. R. Woods, Hazen, 
John E. Smith, and Corse. They contained 60 regiments of infantry, and 4 batteries, the 
infantry numbering 15,894, present for duty ; it was the largest corps in the Army that 
marched to the sea. 

The Army of the Tennessee, under General Howard, formed the right wing of Sherman s 
Army as it marched through Georgia on its way to the sea, and was composed of the Fifteenth 
and Seventeenth Corps, only, that part of the Sixteenth Corps 2 divisions - - which had 
served with the Army of the Tennessee on the Atlanta campaign having been consolidated 
with the two other corps. Although the three other corps in Sherman s Army marched 
uninterrupted to the sea, the Fifteenth had a brisk engagement at Griswoldville, in which 
Walcutt s Brigade, of Woods Division, repelled a determined attack ; and, again, upon 
reaching the sea, Hazen s Division was the one selected for the storming of Fort McAllister. 

Savannah was evacuated December 21, 1804, after a short siege, and on the 1st of Feb 
ruary, Sherman s Army started on its grand, victorious march through the Carolinas. General 
Logan having returned, he was again in command of his corps, which now numbered 15,755, 
infantry and artillery. It encountered some fighting in forcing disputed crossings at some of 
the larger rivers, and captured Columbia, S. C., General C. R. Woods Division occupying the 
city at the time it was burned. The corps was also in line at the battle of Bentonville, N. C., 
March 19, 1865 ; but General Slocurn had won a substantial victory with his wing of the Army, 
and but little fighting, comparatively, devolved upon the Army of the Tennessee. 

Johnston s Army having surrendered April 20th, the corps continued its north ward march, 
and, arriving at Washington May 20th, participated in the Grand Review of May 24, 1805. 
It proceeded, June 2d, to Louisville, Ky., and in the latter part of that month the Second 
Division was ordered to Little Rock, Ark., where it served with the Army of Occupation. 
The organization was discontinued August 1, 1805. 

Smith s Division was still known, officially, as the Second Division, Seventeenth Corps. 



96 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SIXTEENTH COEPS. 

HERNANDO ; COLDWATER ; TOWN CREEK ; SIEGE OF VICKSBURG ; JACKSON ; COLLIER- 
VILLE ; MERIDIAN MARCH ; SNAKE CREEK GAP ; RESACA ; LAY S FERRY ; ROME (/ROSS ROADS ; 
DALLAS ; BIG SHANTY ; KENESAW MOUNTAIN ; RUFF S MILLS ; BATTLE OF ATLANTA ; EZRA 
CHURCH ; JONESBORO ; SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; PLEASANT HILL ;* BAYOU DE GLAIZE ; LAKE 
CHICOT ;* TUPELO ;* TALLAHATCHIE RIVER ;* OXFORD ;* BRICE S CROSS ROADS ; NASHVILLE ;* 
SPANISH FORT ;* FORT BLAKELY.* 

Organized December 18, 1862, with Major-General S. A. Hurlbut in command, and was 
composed of the four divisions of Generals W. S. Smith, Dodge, Kimball, and Lauman. It 
numbered 50,659, present for duty in April, 1863, with 72.569 present and absent. These 
troops were stationed in the vicinity of Memphis, La Grange, and Corinth until June, 1863, 
when the divisions of Smith, Kimball, and Lauman were ordered to Vicksburg in response 
to Grant s call for re-inforcements, and participated in the investment of that place. This 
detachment of the corps, while at Vicksburg, was placed under command of Major-General 
C. C. Washburn. 

It would be impossible to give anything like a connected history of the Sixteenth Corps 
from this time on, so many were the changes in its ranks, and so widely were its divisions 
scattered. The Sixteenth suffered more than any other corps by transfers of its di visions, - 
changes which prevented anything like a continuous organization, and well nigh destroyed 
its identity. Part of the corps served on the Atlanta campaign, while the other part was 
fighting in the Mississippi Valley. It was ordered discontinued in November, 1864, but was 
re-established within a few weeks. An organization would be perfected one month, only to 
be broken up the next. The War Department evinced no conception of what was due to 
corps organization or corps pride, and the unfortunate brigades and divisions were transferred 
hither and thither, with as little consideration as if they were squads from some recruiting 
rendezvous instead of battle-tried divisions. 

The three divisions at Vicksburg were not engaged in any active fighting while there, 
having arrived after the seige was well under way. Lauman s and Smith s divisions, how 
ever, fought at the Siege of Jackson, July 10-16, the former division being attached tempo 
rarily to the Thirteenth, and the latter, to the Ninth Corps. Smith s Division lost at Jack 
son 12 killed, 124 wounded, and 13 missing ; total, 149. Lauman s Division lost 68 killed, 338 
wounded, and 149 missing ; total, 555. Nearly all of Lauman s loss occurred in an ill- 
advised attack made by three regiments of Pugli s Brigade, for which Lauman was relieved 
from command. Many of Lauman s officers, however, have stoutly contended that he was 
not to blame. The enemy having evacuated Jackson, the Army returned to Vicksburg, 
where the troops remained for several weeks. In September, W. S. Smith s Division was 
transferred to the Fifteenth Corps, and Lauman s Division was transferred to the Seventeeth. 
In return, when the Fifteenth Corps moved to Chattanooga, Tuttle s Division of that corps 
was left at Vicksburg and assigned to the Sixteenth Corps. This latter division was com 
manded, subsequently, by General Joseph A. Mower. 

Dodge s Division did not take part in the Vicksburg campaign, but remained at Corinth 
until November, when it moved with Sherman to the relief of Chattanooga, marching from 
Corinth to Pulaski, Tenn., where it was left to guard the Nashville & Decatur R. R., while 
Sherman with the Fifteenth corps moved on to Chattanooga. Two divisions, the Second 
and Fourth, commanded respectively by Generals Sweeny and Veatch, participated in the 
Atlanta campaign, May 1 to September 4, 1864. These two divisions, or the Sixteenth Corps 
as it was designated, were under the command of Major-General Grenville M. Dodge, and 

*Major-General A. J. Smith s command. 



THE SEVENTEENTH CORPS. 07 

formed one of the three corps constituting the Army of the Tennessee. During the Atlanta 
campaign General Veatch was succeeded in the command of his division by General John 
W. Fuller. 

General Dodge s command was prominently engaged at Lay s Ferry, and in the bloody 
battle of Atlanta, July t>2, 1804. After the fall of Atlanta his two divisions were transferred, 
Sweeny s (or Corse s) to the Fifteenth, and Fuller s to the Seventeenth C orps. 

In the meantime the right wing of the Sixteenth Corps, as it was called, had l>een left in 
the Mississippi Valley ; it was composed of the First (Mower s) and Second (A. J. Smith s) 
Divisions, the former being the one which was transferred, in September, is3, from the 
Fifteenth Corps. The greater part of Kimball s Division had been ordered into Arkansas, 
where it became incorporated in the Seventh Corps. In February, 18(54, A. J. Smith s and 
Veatch s Divisions accompanied Sherman on his Meridian expedition. In April, Mower s and 
A. J. Smith s Divisions moved with Banks expedition up the Red River, fighting at the battle 
of Pleasant Hill and in the various minor engagements incidental to that campaign. These 
two divisions had been "loaned" to General Banks by Sherman, with an understanding that 
they should soon return ; but the disasters of Banks campaign prolonged their stay until it 
was too late to rejoin the corps in time for the Atlanta campaign. Hence, the divided oj ora 
tions of the Sixteenth Corps in 1804; the First and Third Divisions, under General A. J. 
Smith, fighting along the Mississippi, while the Second and Fourth Divisions, under Dodge, 
fought from Chattanooga to Atlanta. 

On November 7, 1864, orders were issued for the discontinuance of the organization ; but 
in December, 1864, General A. J. Smith and his two divisions turned up at the defense of 
Nashville, and participated in the victory over Hood s Army ; casualties, 750. In this battle 
Smith s two divisions were commanded by Generals McArthur and Kenner Garrard. His 
command was designated as a " Detachment, Army of the Tennessee," although it was still 
known as the Sixteenth Corps. 

It was reorganized Feb. 18, 1805, under its old designation and with Major-General A. J. 
Smith in command. As reorganized, it had three divisions which were commanded by Gen 
erals McArthur, Garrard and E. A. Carr. Proceeding to Mobile, it was engaged in the siege, 
and in the fighting at Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, the latter being the last infantry 
engagement of the war. Fort Blakely was carried by assault, April 9, 1865, the day on 
which Lee surrendered at Appomattox. The corps organization was finally discontinued 
July 20, 1865. 

The men of the Sixteenth had for the most part seen plenty of service before the organi 
zation of the corps. They had fought well at luka, Corinth and Hatchie River, and many of 
the regiments had been engaged at Fort Donelson and Shiloh. 



SEVENTEENTH CORPS. 

PORT GIBSON ; HANKINSON S FERRY ; RAYMOND; JACKSON (May 14th); CHAMPION S HILL; 
ASSAULT ON VICKSBUKG, MAY I .TH ; ASSAULT ON VICKSBURG, MAY ii> ; FORT HILL; VICKS- 
BURG TRENCHES ; SIEGE OF JACKSON ; MERIDIAN EXPEDITION ; MISSIONARY RIDGE ; BIG SHANTY; 
KENESAW MOUNTAIN ; CHATTAHOOCHIE RIVER ; NICKAJACK CREEK ; BATTLE OF ATLANTA ; 
EZRA CHURCH; JONESBORO; LOVEJOY S STATION; SHERMAN S MARCH; OGEECHEE RIVER; 
SIEGE OF SAVANNAH : COMBAHEE RIVER; POCATALIGO ; RIVER S BRIDGE; EDISTO RIVER; 
ORANGEBURG ; CHERAW ; FAYETTEVILLE ; BENTONVILLE ; BENTON ;* VAUGHN S STATION ;* 



Second, or Ked Hirer Division. 

7 



98 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JACKSON (July 6, 1864) ;* FORT DE RUSSY ; * CLOUTIERSVILLE ;* CANE RIVER ;* MARKSVILLE ;* 
BAYOU DEGLAIZE;* NASHVILLE.* 

The Seventeenth Corps was organized December 18, 1862, under the same order which 
created the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Corps. It was composed of the divisions of Logan, 
Me Arthur and Quinby, formerly the Third, Sixth and Seventh Divisions of Grant s Army, 
-and Major-General J. B. McPherson was assigned to its command. It was engaged in the 
operations on the Mississippi River prior to the campaign in the rear of Vicksburg, and then 
took a prominent part in the series of battles which resulted in. the investment of that place. 
Its three divisions entered upon that campaign with 37 regiments of infantry, and 12 batteries 
(60 guns) of light artillery, numbering, in all, 15,848 officers and men present for duty. Its 
total enrollment, present and absent, amounted to 23,154. 

Logan s Division was engaged at the battle of Port Gibson (Magnolia Hills), where it lost 
6 killed, 41 wounded, and 2 missing ; also at Raymond, where it was the only division in 
action, losing there 66 killed, 339 wounded, and 37 missing. At the battle of Jackson, May 
14th, the brunt of the fight fell on the Seventeenth Corps and 011 Quinby s Division, which 
lost 36 killed, 229 wounded, and 3 missing ; total, 268. General Quinby being absent on 
account of illness, his division was commanded there by General Crocker. At Champion s 
Hill, both Logan s and Crocker s Divisions were engaged, losing in the aggregate 179 killed, 
857 wounded, and 42 missing ; total, 1,078. During these battles McArthur s Division had 
been absent on duty, but joined the corps in time for the first assault on Vicksburg, May 19, 
in which it lost 16 killed and 113 wounded. In the general assault of May 22d, the corps lost 
150 killed, 880 wounded, and 36 missing ; total, 1,066. It also sustained a severe loss in the 
trenches during the siege, and was engaged in the affair at Fort Hill, a strong earth- work in 
front of the corps position. This fort was successfully mined and blown up, June 25th, but 
the assaulting column was unable to retain their lodgment in the crater. Upon the surrender 
of Vicksburg, Logan s Division was accorded the honor of first entering and occupying the 
city, while the rest of the corps marched away with Sherman s Expedition against Jackson. 

That place having been captured, the Army returned to Vicksburg, where, in September, 
1863, the Fourth Division of the Sixteenth Corps (formerly Lauman s) was transferred to the 
Seventeenth, and placed under command of General M. M. Crocker. At the same time, 
Quinby s Division was transferred to the Fifteenth Corps. During the fall of 1863, the corps 
took part in various raids and marches, and in February, 1864, Crocker s and Leggett s Divis 
ions accompanied Sherman s Army on the expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, Miss., and 
on the return. Soon after this the corps became divided, two divisions joining Sherman s 
Army in the advance on Atlanta, while the rest of the corps remained in the Mississippi 
Valley. 

In May, 1864, the Third and Fourth Divisions were assembled at Huntsville, Ala., from 

whence they marched through Georgia, and joined Sherman s Army on the 8th of June, at 

Ack worth, Ga. The corps was under the command of Major-General Frank P. Blair, General 

McPherson having been promoted to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, which 

comprised the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps. Blair s two divisions the ones 

with Sherman s Army- -were commanded by Generals Leggett and Gresham, the latter 

succeeding General Crocker, who relinquished his command, May 27th, on account of 

health. Although Sherman s Army was well on its way to Atlanta, there was plenty of 

fighting left for the Seventeenth Corps. It was engaged with honor in the battle of 

Atlanta, July : :2nd, which was one of the hardest contested fields in that campaign. General 

Gresham was badly wounded in this action, and General Giles A. Smith succeeded to the 



* Second, or Kcd River Division. 



THE SEVENTEENTH CORPS. 09 

command of the Fourth Division. After the fall of Atlanta, Fuller s Division of the Six 
teenth Corps was transferred to the Seventeenth, becoming its First Division, to the command 
of which General Joseph A. Mower was soon after assigned. 

While on the March to the Sea, and during Sherman s march through the Carolinas, the 
corps remained under the command of General Blair, with its three divisions-- First, Third, 
and Fourth under Generals Mower, Leggett, and Giles A. Smith. Just before starting on 
the March to the Sea its morning reports showed 11,732 present for duty ; it then contained 
32 regiments of infantry and five light batteries. It encountered little or no fighting as it 
went marching through Georgia, but its advance through the Carolinas was marked by several 
minor engagements, culminating in the battleof Bentonvillein which it was partially engaged. 
There were long, toilsome marches, also, with wide rivers to cross and swamps to wade, many 
of which were forded under the enemy s fire. 

After participating in the Grand Review at Washington at the close of the war, the Army 
of the Tennessee --Fifteenth and Seventeenth Army Corps was ordered in June, is<f>, to 
Louisville, Ky. On the Oth of July, orders were issued to prepare the Army of the Tennessee 
for muster-out ; in a few weeks the ranks which had fought at Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, 
Vicksburg, Atlanta, and in the Carolinas, moved northward and disappeared. 

When the Seventeenth Corps started on the Atlanta campaign it left the First and Sec 
ond Divisions in the Mississippi Valley, and the corps thus separated was not reunited. The 
place of the Fii-st Division was filled at Atlanta by the transfer from the Sixteenth Corps ; 
the place of the Second Division remained vacant, for that division continued to serve in the 
Department of the Mississippi as a part of the Seventeenth Corps. Six regiments from this 
division served on Banks Red River Expedition in April, 1864, the six regiments --formed 
into two brigades --being known then as a Provisional, or as the Red River Division of the 
Seventeenth Corps. It was commanded by General T. K. Smith. Parts of this division 
served, also, on McArthur s Yazoo City Expedition, May 4-13, 1804, and on General Slocum s 
Expedition to Jackson, July 5-6, 1864. A few regiments were engaged, also, under Sturgis, 
at Brice s Cross Roads, and in General A. J. Smith s Expedition to Tupelo. The fighting in 
some of these campaigns was severe on certain regiments. 

In November, 1864, the Red River Division of the Seventeenth Corps accompanied General 
A. J. Smith s forces to Nashville, and took part in that famous battle and victory. Smith s 
troops consisted of two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps and this provisional division of the 
Seventeenth ; but the whole command was officially designated as a " Detachment, from the 
Army of the Tennessee," instead of by their corps numbers. Upon the reorganization of the 
Sixteenth Corps, prior to the Mobile campaign of 1865, this division of the Seventeenth was 
merged in the larger organization of tlrj Sixteenth ; hence, the Seventeenth Corps, in 1S65, 
consisted of the three divisions then marching with Sherman northward through the Carolinas. 

EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 

KINSTON ; WHITEHALL ; GOLDSBOKO ; SIEGE OF WASHINGTON (1 . C. SIEOE OF SUFFOLK : 
QUAKER BRIDGE ; GUM SWAMP ; BACHELOR S CREEK ; WINTON ; PORT WALTHALL; ARROW 
FIELD CHURCH; DREWRY S BLUFF; BERMUDA HUNDRED; COLD HARBOR; 
PETERSBURG, JUNE 15TH ; MINE EXPLOSION ; PETERSBURG TRENCHES ; CHAFFIN S FARM ; FAIR 
OAKS (1864); FALL OF RICHMOND. 

On December 24, 1862, the President ordered that the troops in the Department of North 
Carolina should be organized into a corps and designated as the Eighteenth. Tin-so 
were stationed at Newbern, Plymouth, Beaufort, and vicinity. They included Peel * Division, 



100 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

formerly of the Fourth (Peninsular) Corps ; also, some regiments which had fought under 
Burnside at Roanoke Island and New Berne. There were, also, twelve regiments of nine- 
months men six of them from Massachusetts, and six from Pennsylvania-- whose terms 
of enlistment expired in the summer of 1803. Some of these nine months regiments had 
fought creditably at Kinston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro, in December, 1862, the same month 
in which the corps was organized. 

In February, 1863, the roster showed five divisions, commanded respectively by Generals 
Palmer, Naglee, Ferry, Wessells, and Prince, with General J. G. Foster in command of the 
corps. Ferry s and Naglee s Divisions containing sixteen regiments were detached in 
February, 1863, and ordered to Charleston Harbor, where they were attached to the Tenth 
Corps, becoming subsequently a part of that organization. In June, 1863, the twelve regi 
ments which had been enrolled for nine months only took their departure, their term of service 
having expired. In place of these losses the troops of the Seventh Corps were transferred, 
that organization having been discontinued August 1, 1863. With the Seventh Corps came a 
valuable accession of veteran material in Getty s Division, formerly of the Ninth Corps. This 
division had been left in South-eastern Virginia when the Ninth Corps went to the West, and 
had been engaged, in. the spring of 1863, in the defense of Suffolk against Longstreet s 
besieging Army. 

After the withdrawal of the enemy from the vicinity of Suffolk, there were 110 operations 
of consequence during the year 1863 in the Department of North Carolina, and the corps 
was left in quiet possession of the territory. There were, however, occasional reconnois- 
sances into the enemy s country, and some skirmishing at the outposts. 

In April, 1864, the corps was concentrated at Yorktown, preparatory to the spring cam 
paign of the Army of the James. That army was commanded by General Butler, and was 
composed of the Tenth and Eighteenth Corps. The Eighteenth, as organized for this cam 
paign, contained 15,972 officers and men present for duty, including the artillery, which carried 
36 guns. It was commanded by William F. Smith, a Sixth Corps general, who had fought 
under McClellan, and who, later on, had achieved distinction through his successful plan of 
the battles of Chattanooga. The corps contained three divisions, commanded by Generals 
Brooks, Weitzel and Hinks, the division of the latter being composed of colored troops. 
Butler s Army landed at Bermuda Hundred May 6, 1864, the same day that Grant was 
fighting in the Wilderness, and a series of bloody battles immediately followed, the princi 
pal one occurring May 16th, at Drewry s Bluff. The campaign was a short one, resulting in 
defeat, and Butler withdrew to his original position on the James River, the corps losing in 
these operations 213 killed, 1,224 wounded and 742 missing ; total, 2,179. General Grant then 
ordered the Eighteenth Corps to reinforce the Army of the Potomac, and on May 27th it 
moved by transports down the James and up the York River to White House Landing, from 
whence it marched to Cold Harbor. Hinks Division was left behind, and in its place, two divis 
ions of the Tenth Corps, under General Devens, temporarily attached to the Eighteenth as a 
third division, moved with General Smith s command, the three divisions being commanded 
at Cold Harbor by Generals Brooks, Martindale and Devens. In that battle the Eighteenth 
Corps made a gallant attack on the enemy s intrenchments ; but, like the various other corps 
engaged, it was obliged to abandon the assault with heavy loss, its casualties at Cold Harbor 
amounted to 448 killed, 2,365 wounded, and 206 missing ; total, 3,019. 

On June 12th, General Smith s command withdrew from Cold Harbor, and, re-embarking, 
sailed for Bermuda Hundred, arriving there on the 14th. On the following day the Eighteenth 
Corps advanced to Petersburg and assaulted the works that evening, Hinks Colored Division 
gaining a partial success and capturing several pieces of artillery. This was the first time in 
the war in which colored troops, to the extent of a brigade, were engaged in battle. 



THE NINKTKENTH Coin s. 

After the failure of the assaults on Petersburg the Eighteenth Corps wont into position 
in the trenches, .and participated in the siege. It held tho extreme right of the line, at which 
l>oiiit the contending armies were nearest each other. The proximity of tin; enemy s pickets 
and the incessant firing occasioned large losses, daily, in killed and wounded. 

On August 26th it was relieved by the Tenth Corps, and ordered within the defenses of 
Bermuda Hundred. In the latter part of September it was ordered to the north bank of the 
James, where, on the 29th, the First Division (Stamiard s) participated in the brilliant and 
successful assault on Fort Harrison, at Chaffin s Farm. At this time, General Stannard com 
manded the First Division, General Brooks having resigned in July; General Paine had 
succeeded Hinks in command of the colored (Third) division ; and while at Chaffin s Farm, 
General Weitzel, who had been acting as chief of staff to General Butler, succeeded Orel in 
command of the corps. The Eighteenth, under Weitzel, was also engaged at the battle of 
Fair Oaks. October 27, 1864, which was fought on the old battle h eld of 1862. 

On December 3, 1864, the corps was ordered discontinued. The white troops of the 
Tenth and Eighteenth Corps were organized into one corps, designated as the Twenty- 
fourth ; the colored troops belonging to the Tenth and Eighteenth were organized as another, 
which was designated the Twenty-fifth. The regiments of the Eighteenth were formed into 
a division of three brigades, which became Devens (3d) Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps. 

As the Eighteenth Corps was to remain in Virginia with the Army, it is difficult to under 
stand what good reason the War Department could have had for thus wiping out the honored 
name under which the corps had fought so long and well. 

NINETEENTH CORPS. 

BATON ROUQK ; GEORGIA LANDING ; BAYOU TECHE ; FORT BISLAND : IRISH BEND; PLAINS 
STORE ; ASSAULT ON PORT HUDSON, MAY 27TH ; ASSAULT ON PORT HUDSON, JUNE UTH ; PORT 
HUDSON TRENCHES; THIBODEAUX ; BRASHEAR CITY ; DONALDSONVILLE ; SABINE CROSSROADS; 
PLEASANT HILL ; (JANE RIVER ; CLOUTIERVILLE ; ALEXANDRIA ; M ANSURA ; YELLOW BAYOU ; 
ATCHAFALAYA: BERRY VILLE ; OPEQUOX ; FISHER S HILL; CEDAR CREEK. 

Organized under General Order No. 5, dated at Washington, Jan. 5, 1863 : " By direction 
of the President, the troops in the Department of the Gulf will constitute the Nineteenth 
Army Corps, to date from December 14, 1862, and Major-General N. P. Banks is assigned to 
the command." 

At this time the troops of the Nineteenth Corps were, for the most part, just arriving 
from the North on ocean transports, and some of the regiments which had been assigned to 
the corps had not landed at this date. There had been some Union troops in Louisiana 
since the occupation of New Orleans, one brigade of which, under command of General 
Thomas Williams, fought at Baton Rouge, August 5, 18C2, making a gallant and successful 
defence against the attack of B reck en ridge s Division. General Williams was killed in this 
battle. Another brigade, under General Weitzel, was engaged in a hot fight, October 27, 
1862, at Georgia Landing (Labadiesville) in the LaFourche district. 

Soon after the date of the order creating the Nineteenth Corps, an organization was 
effected. The returns for April, 1863, show four divisions, commanded resi>ectively by Generals 
Augur, Sherman (Thos. W.), Emory and Grover. In addition, the corps command included 
seven unassigned regiments. stationed at Brashear City, Key West, Tortugas and West Florida; 
in all, 65 regiments of infantry, 19 batteries of light artillery, one regiment of heavy artil 
lery, and 5 regiments of cavalry. It numbered, all told -- present and absent- - 55,229 ; 
present, 44,832 ; present for duty, 35,670. Forty of these regiments had been organized in 



102 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

the fall of 1862, under the second call for troops, and twenty-two of them were enlisted for 
nine months only, the terms of the latter expiring in July, 1863. There were also six newly 
organized regiments of colored troops from Louisiana. The New England States contributed 
39 regiments, 21 of which were nine-months men ; there were 22 regiments from New York, 
and 1 from Pennsylvania, the latter (47th Penn.) being the only Keystone regiment in the 
Department of the Gulf. 

Active operations were soon commenced, and on April 12, 1863, the corps encountered the 
enemy at Fort Bisland, La., with a loss of 40 killed, and 184 wounded ; and on the 14th, at 
Irish Bend. La., with a loss of 49 killed, 274 wounded, and 30 missing; total casualties in 
both actions, 577. The investment of Port Hudson was accomplished in the following 
month, and on May 27th a gallant but unsuccessful attempt was made to carry the enemy s 
works by storm, the corps losing in this action 293 killed, 1,545 wounded, and 157 missing ; 
total, 1,995. Another general assault was made on June 14th, but without success ; loss, 
203 killed, 1,401 wounded, and 201 missing ; total, 1,805. In the meantime, the constant fir 
ing from the trenches resulted in additional daily losses in killed and wounded. The Confed 
erate garrison, learning of the fall of Vicksburg, surrendered on July 9th. The losses in the 
corps during the siege including the assaults of May 27th and June 14th amounted to 
707 killed, 3,336 wounded, and 319 missing ; total, 4,362. The heaviest loss fell on Augur s 
(1st) Division. Fearing s Brigade, of Paine s (3d) Division, also sustained a severe loss, and 
one of the Louisiana (colored) regiments suffered severely in the assaults. 

Soon after the surrender of Port Hudson and termination of that campaign, the 22 regi 
ments which had been recruited for nine months left for their homes, their term of service 
having expired. The loss of these troops necessitated a reduction of the organization to 
three divisions. The ensuing nine months July, 1863, to March, 1864 were spent in post 
or garrison duty, with some reconnoissances and minor expeditions into the enemy s country. 
On the 15th of March, 1864, the troops started on Banks Eed River Expedition, his Army 
consisting of parts of the Thirteenth, Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Nineteenth Corps. Major- 
General William B. Franklin commanded the Nineteenth Corps on this expedition, and took 
with him the First (Emory s) and Second (Grover s) Divisions; the Third Division was left in 
the defenses of New Orleans. Upon the arrival of Bank s Army at Alexandria the Second 
Division was left there, while the First moved on and fought at Sabine Cross Roads. In 
addition to the battles of Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill, the corps was engaged in 
several minor actions while on this expedition. 

In July, 1864, the First and Second Divisions proceeded to New Orleans, and embarked 
for Virginia, leaving the rest of the corps in Louisiana. On arriving at Washington the two 
divisions were ordered into Maryland to confront Early s invasion, after which they served in 
the Shenandoah Valley, in Sheridan s Army. The Nineteenth Corps, or this part of it, was 
now under the command of General William H. Emory ; the First Division, containing 17 
regiments, was commanded by General William Dwight ; the Second Division, containing 
4 brigades, 21 regiments, was commanded by General Cuvier Grover. The returns from these 
two divisions for August, 1864, show an aggregate of 21,640, present and absent ; 14,645 
present, with 13,176 present for duty. Of the latter, the corps lost over 5,000 men in the 
Shenandoah campaign. It lost at the Opequon, September 19th, 314 killed, 1,554 wounded, 
and 206 missing ; at Fisher s Hill, September 22d, 15 killed, 86 wounded, and 13 missing ; at 
Cedar Creek, October 19th, 257 killed, 1,336 wounded, and 790 missing ; in skirmishes and 
on the picket lines, 57 killed, 446 wounded, and 13 missing ; in all, 5,087 casualties. At the 
Opequon, Grover s Division lost 1,527 men out of 6,797 taken into action, or present for duty 
before the battle. 

The fighting in the Valley having ended, Grover s (2d) Division was ordered, in January, 



TUB TWKNTIKTH CORPS. 

1865, to proceed to Savannah, where it was followed hy the First Division, which left the 
Valley in April. The latter division made a short stay at Washington hefore sailing for 
Savannah, during which it participated in the Grand Review of May 24, 1805. The Second 
Division having arrived at -Savannah, General G rover was assigned to the command of the 
district, and General H. W. Birge to the command of the division. In March, 1S05, Dirge s 
Division, containing three brigades, eighteen regiments, was ordered to North Carolina, 
where it was attached temporarily to the Tenth Corps and was designated as the First Division 
of that corps. The Fourth Brigade of Birge s Division was left at Savannah, the whole 
division returning there in May. The Nineteenth corps remained at Savannah and vicinity 
until August, 1805 ; some of the regiments remained until 1800. The corps organization, 
however, was officially discontinued March 20, 1805. 

The portion of the corps left behind at New Orleans remained in the Department of the 
Gulf, and, in the spring of 18(55, participated with the Thirteenth and Sixteenth corps in 
General Canby s operations against Fort Blakely, Spanish Fort, and Mobile. 

TWENTIETH CORPS. 

(McCooK s.) 
STONE S RIVER ; LIBERTY GAP ; CHICKAMAUOA. 

4 

Tins corps was identical with that part of the Army of the Cumberland, or Fourteenth 
Corps, which had been designated as the Right Wing until January ! , ISO;}, when, under 
General Order No. 9, the War Department directed that the Right Wing be set apart and 
designated as the Twentieth Corps. Major-General A. McD. McCook, its former com 
mander, and Generals Davis, Johnson, and Sheridan, its former generals of division, were 
retained in command. 

The troops composing u McCook s Corps," as it was generally called in the army, were 
veterans who li;id \\-iili-liMp.l ilir fire of li.-ml fought fields. Many of the regiments had 
fought at Shiloh, and at Chaplin Hills, and all of them were engaged at Stone s River. 
McCook had distinguished himself at Shiloh, where his division contributed largely to Buell s 
success in the second day s battle; also at Chaplin Hills, in which battle his command was 
almost the only force engaged. The Twentieth Corps, at the time it was so designated, con 
tained the same troops which fought at Stone s River, with the same organization of divis 
ions and brigades. There were three divisions, each containing three brigades ; in all, 37 regi 
ments of infantry, and 9 batteries of light artillery, one battery being attached to each 
brigade. It numbered, just before the battle of Stone s River, 13,77!) present for duty. 

After Rosecrans victory at Stone s River, the Twentieth Corps advanced with the Army 
of the Cumberland and occupied Murfreesboro, where it remained until June, 1803. The 
advance on Chattanooga then commenced, during which the corps encountered the enemy at 
Liberty Gap, Tenn., on the 25th of June. Its casualties in that action amounted to 42 killed, 
231 wounded, and 1 missing ; total, 274. 

It accompanied Rosecrans across the Cumberland Mountains in his inn-suit of Bragg, and 
on Sept. 19th fought at Chickamauga. In this battle McCook s Corps took eight brigades, 
12,480 men, into action ; it lost 423 killed, 2, OD8 wounded, and 1,215 missing ; total, 4, 33< - ,. 
One brigade --Post s (1st) Brigade, Davis (1st) Division -- was not engaged, l>eing absent 
guarding a supply train. 

On September 28th, 1803, the Twentieth and Twenty-first Corps were consolidated, form 
ing the Fourth Corps, Army of the Cumlerland. . By this arrangement General McCook 
was left without a command. 



104 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

TWENTIETH CORPS. 
(HOOKER S). 

ROCKY FACE RIDGE ; RESACA ; CASSVILLE ; NEW HOPE CHURCH ; DALLAS ; PINE KNOB ; 
GOLGOTHA; CULP S FARM ; KENESAW MOUNTAIN ; PEACH TREE CREEK ; SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; 
MARCH TO THE SEA ; SIEGE OP SAVANNAH ; ARGYLE ISLAND ; MONTEITH SWAMP ; AVERASBORO ; 
BENTONVILLE ; NASHVILLE.* 

This corps was formed April 4, 1864, by taking the Twelfth Corps, which was composed 
of the veteran divisions of Williams and Geary, and adding to it Butterfield s newly organ 
ized division. At the same time, two divisions of the Eleventh Corps f were broken up and 
distributed to the divisions of Williams, Geary and Butter-field. The badge of the Twelfth 
Corps was retained, and there was no good reason why its number should not have been 
retained also ; the brigade and division generals of the Twelfth Corps retained their respect 
ive commands, and little change was made other than the increase by accessions of trans 
ferred material. 

Each division now contained three brigades, containing in all 52 regiments of infantry, 

and 6 batteries of light artillery, numbering 21,280 officers and men present for duty. It was 
all veteran material, the most of the regiments having served with the Army of the Potomac 
in many of the greatest battles of the war, and, later on, at Wauhatchie and Lookout 
Mountain. Major-General Joseph Hooker was placed in command. It was a grand corps, and 
worthy of the hero who was to lead it. 

In addition to the three divisions of Williams, Geary and Butterfield, there was a Fourth 
Division, under command of Major-General Lovell H. Rousseau. This division was 
detached on post or garrison duty and never joined the corps ; in fact, the men of the 
Twentieth were unaware of the existence of a Fourth Division. A part of Rousseau s 
Division was engaged in the Tennessee campaign against Hood, in 1864, and was present at 
the battle of Nashville. 

The Twentieth Corps started, May 4, 1864, on the Atlanta campaign, and during the next 
four months participated in all the important battles, its hardest fighting occurring at Resaca, 
May 15th, at New Hope Church, May 25th, and at Peach Tree Creek, July 20th. It was 
also actively engaged in the investment and siege of Atlanta, sustaining losses daily in killed 
and wounded while occupying the trenches. During the four months fighting from Chatta 
nooga to Atlanta, it lost over 7,000 men killed, wounded and missing. Before reaching 
Atlanta, Hooker had a disagreement with Sherman, and asked to be relieved. He was suc 
ceeded by Major-General Henry W. Slocum, the former commander of the Twelfth Corps, 
and one of the ablest generals in the Union armies. General Butterfield, commanding the 
Third Division, was succeeded during the campaign by General William C. Ward. Upon the 
evacuation of Atlanta, some troops of the Twentieth Corps Coburn s Brigade of Ward s 
Division were the first to enter and occupy the city, the entire corps remaining there to hold 
their important prize, while Sherman and the rest of the Army marched in pursuit of Hood. 

On November 15, 1864, Sherman and his men started on their grand march through 
Georgia to the Sea, the Army of the Cumberland -- Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps - 
forming the Right Wing, under command of General Slocum. General A. S. Williams, of 
the First Division, succeeded to the command of the corps, with Jackson, Geary, and Ward as 
division generals. When it started on this march, the corps numbered 13,741, present for 
duty, and contained 47 regiments of infantry, 1 of engineers, 1 of pontoniers, and 4 batteries 

* Rousseau s Fourth Division (20th A. C.) participated in the battle of Nashville. 

t One division of the Eleventh Corps (Sehimmelfennig s) had been sent to South Carolina, 



TllK TWKNTY-FlKST CORPS. 105 

of light artillery. It was actively engaged at the siege of Savannah, and upon Hartley s 
evacuation, Decemher 20th, Geary s Division was the first to enter the city. 

Leaving Savannah in February, 1805, the Army marched northward through the Caro- 
linas, and at the battle of Averasboro (N. C.), the Twentieth Corps was the only infantry 
engaged ; loss, 77 killed, and 47.~> wounded. Three days later, Jackson s and Ward s Divis 
ions were hotly engaged in General Slocum s battle at Bentonville. At the close of the cam 
paign, in April, 1865, Major-General Joseph A. Mower was assigned to the command of the 
corps, whereupon General Williams resumed his old command, that of the First, or 
KVd Si;ir I MYI-IMII. 

Williams, whose commission as brigadier dated May 17, istil, had commanded tliis division 
from the beginning of the war. It was remarkable as being the only division which served 
during the war without a change of commander. Williams commanded it at Winchester, May, 

1862, and rode at its head in the Grand Review of May, 1865 ; lie was absent only when in 
temporary command of the corps. He commanded the Twelfth Corps at Antietam, Mansfield 
having been killed while going into action ; also, at Gettysburg, Slocum being in command 
then of the Right Wing. He also commanded the Twentieth Corps while on the March to the 
Sea and through the Carolinas ; at the battles of Averasboro and Bentonville. He was an 
able officer, enjoying to the fullest extent the respect and confidence of every officer and man 
in his division. Denied the commission of a major-general which he had earned so well, and 
superseded in command of his corps, the gallant old patriot made no sign of complaint, and 
continued to serve his country faithfully and well. The persistent refusal to recognize 
Williams services together with the influence and motives which prompted such action were 
discreditable, to say the least. 

The campaign in the Carolinas having ended in Johnston s surrender, the Twentieth 
Corps marched oil to Washington, where it participated in the Grand Review, and was then 
disbanded. 

TWENTY-FIRST CORPS. 
STONE S RIVER ; CHICKAMAUGA. 

On the 7th of November, 1862, General Rosecrans divided the Army of the Cumberland 

-then known as the Fourteenth Army Corps --into the Right Wing, Centre, and Left Wing. 

The organization of the left wing, as then arranged, remained unchanged until January 9, 

1863, when, by authority of the War Department, General Order No. 9, its designation was 
changed to that of the Twenty-first Corps. No other change was made, the different brigades 
and divisions remaining as before. 

The left wing, or Twenty-first Corps, was organized with Major-General Thomas L. 
Crittenden in command, and contained the three divisions of W. S. Smith, Van Cleve, and 
Hascall. At the battle of Stone s River the divisions were commanded by Generals Thos. J. 
Wood, Palmer, and Van Cleve. The three divisions contained three brigades each ; in all, 
38 regiments of infantry, and 8 batteries of light artillery. The losses of the left wing at 
Stone s River amounted to 650 killed, 3,006 wounded, and 873 missing ; total, 4,529, out of 
12,909 officers and men engaged. 

After this battle the enemy fell back, whereupon Rosecrans Army occupied Murf reesboro, 
remaining encamped there, or in its vicinity, until June, 1S63, when another forward move 
ment took place which ended in the battle of Chickamauga and in the permanent occupation 
of Chattanooga. The Twenty-first Corps fought at Chickamauga under the same corps and 
division generals as at Stone s River. The organization was the same, 3 divisions of 
brigades each ; the regiments, however (38 in number), had diminished in size. The corps 



106 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

numbered, at Chickamauga, 14,040 present for duty. Wagner s (2d) Brigade, of Wood s (1st) 
Division, was not engaged, having been left on duty at Chattanooga. Two regiments were 
also detailed elsewhere, leaving 11,480 men in action. Of this number, the corps lost 322 
killed, 2,382 wounded, and 699 missing ; total, 3,403. 

There seems to be a general impression that, after the disaster at Chickamauga, the day 
was saved solely by Thomas Corps. In justice to the gallant men of Crittenden s command, 
it should be stated that Palmer s Division of the Twenty-first Corps fought with Thomas during 
the whole battle ; and that General Wood with two brigades of his own division, and one 
from Van Cleve s which was not cut off, went to the aid of Thomas on the second day. 

Soon after this battle the Twentieth and the Twenty-first Corps were consolidated, 
forming the Fourth Corps. General Crittenden was left without a command, but was subse 
quently assigned to a division in the Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, while on the 
Wilderness campaign of the following spring. 



TWENTY-SECOND CORPS. 
FORT STEVENS. 

This organization comprised the troops occupying the defenses of Washington. It was 
organized February 2, 1863, with Major-General S. P. Heintzelman. in command. He was 
succeeded by Major-General C. C. Augur, who was in command at the time of Eaiiy s in 
vasion in July, 1864. 

At that time the Confederate troops advanced within the limits of the city of Washing 
ton, and a severe battle was fought at Fort Stevens, in the outskirts of the city. In this 
battle the principal part of the fighting devolved upon the Sixth Corps ; but prior to its 
arrival, Hardin s Division of the Twenty -second Corps held the skirmish line and the outer 
line of works, confronting Early s advance, Hardin s troops were under fire and became 
engaged at various points on the line, their losses amounting to Y3, killed and wounded. 

The roster of the corps was continually changing, as the Department was being con 
tinually drawn upon for reinforcements for the field, thereby preventing anything like a 
continuous organization. At one time, the corps was commanded by Major-General Jno. G. 
Parke, while among its various division commanders were Generals Hardin, De Russy and 
Hascall. 

TWENTY-THIRD CORPS. 

LENOIR ; BLUE SPRINGS ; CAMPBELL S STATION ; KNOXVILLE ; MOSSY CREEK ; DANDRIDGE ; 
WALKER S FORD ; STRAWBERRY PLAINS ; ROCKY FACE RIDGE ; RESACA ; CASSVILLE ; DALLAS ; 
PINE MOUNTAIN ; LOST MOUNTAIN ; GULP S FARM ; KENESAW ; CHATTAHOOCHIE ; DECATUR ; 
SIEGE OF ATLANTA ; UTOY CREEK ; LOVEJOY S STATION ; COLUMBIA ; SPRING HILL ; FRANKLIN ; 
NASHVILLE ; FORT ANDERSON, N. C. ; TOWN CREEK ; WILMINGTON ; KINSTON ; GOLDSBORO. 

General Burnside was assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in the 
spring of 1863, his district including Kentucky and East Tennessee. The Ninth Corps left 
Virginia at this time and was assigned to his command ; but, having planned an active cam 
paign in East Tennessee, and needing additional troops, he organized the Twenty-third Corps 
from the regiments then stationed in Kentucky. 

This new corps was formed April 27, 1863, with Major- General George L. Hartsuff in 
command. Generals Julius White and Milo S. Hascall were assigned to division commands. 



THK TWENTY-THIRD CORPS. 107 

The proposed campaign in East Tennessee was postponed, as the Ninth Corps was ordered to 
Vicksburg, to reinforce Grant s army ; but in August, the Ninth Corps returned to Ken 
lucky, and the advance of the Twenty-third commenced. The Second Division (\VhiteV) 
made its rendezvous at New Market, from whence it marched on the 10th, arriving at London, 
Tenn., on the 4th of September. General Longstreet s Corps had been detach**! from Lee s 
Army, and, in Octol>er, 1803, marched into East Tennessee to drive out Bnrnside s Army <f 
the Ohio, as the united forces of the Ninth and Twenty-third Corps were then designated. 
The fighting was continuous, minor engagements occurring almost daily, and on November 
16th a spirited battle occurred at Campbell s Station, in which White s Division was actively 
engaged. Burnside moved next to Knoxville, which place was invested and finally assaulted 
by Longstreet, but without success. At Campbell s Station, and at Knoxville, the corps was 
commanded by General Mahlon D. Manson. 

In August, 1863, Mahan s Brigade? of Indiana troops was assigned to the Third Division. 
These regiments were recruited for six months service only, and returned to Indiana in Feb 
ruary, 1864. They served in East Tennessee, and were present at Blue Springs and Walker s 
Ford. 

On the 4th of April, 1*64, Major-General John M. Schofield was assigned to the corps, and 
he commanded it during the Atlanta campaign, which was the most eventful period of its exist 
ence. In the spring of 18f!4,Hovey s Division of Indiana troops, newly recruited, joined the corps 
at Charleston, Tenn., and was designated as the First Division. The Second Division was 
commanded by General Henry M. Judah, and the Third Division by General Jacob I). Cox, 
with which organization it started on the Atlanta campaign. But on June (5, 1804, the First 
Division was broken up and divided between the other two divisions. While on the Atlanta 
campaign. General Judah was succeeded by General Hascall in the command of the Second 
Division. The greatest loss of the corps during that campaign was sustained May 14, 180:, 
at the battle of Resaca. It also encountered some hard fighting near Kenesaw and at Utoy 
Creek. 

After the fall of Atlanta, and while Sherman s Army was wending its way to the Sea, 
the Twenty-third Corps joined Thomas Army in the Tennessee campaign against Hood. Tin- 
corps was still under the command of General Schofield, while the two divisions, Second and 
Third, were commanded, respectively, by Generals Ruger and Cox. These two divisions 
ontained 30 regiments of infantry and 4 batteries of light artillery. Their returns for 
October 31, 18(54, just before stalling on the Tennessee campaign show 1 0,0:24 officers and 
men present for duty. The corps was actively engaged at the battle of Franklin, but at 
Nashville it was largely held in reserve. In the latter action, Ruger s (2d) Division was com 
manded by Major-General Darius N. Couch. 

In January, 1865. the corps moved from Nashville, via Washington, to North Carolina, 
Cox s Division landing at Fort Fisher, February i, 1865. Moving up the river, the corps fought 
at Fort Anderson, and at Wilmington, February ^Ist, capturing the latter place. In the 
meantime, another division was formed, and designated as the First Division, with General 
Ruger in command. This division was actively engaged in the victory at Kinston, N. C. 
(Wise s Forks), which resulted in the occupation of Goldsboro. General Cox succeeded 
Schofield, the latter having been promoted to the command of the Army of the Ohio, which, 
since the arrival of the Twenty-third Corps in North Carolina, comprised two corps the 
Tenth (Terry s) and Twenty-third. On the loth of April, 1805, the Twenty-third Corps 
numbered 14,21)3 present for duty, and was composed of three divisions - -Ruger s, Couch s, 
and Carter s. It remained in North Carolina while Sherman s Army, with which it had 
made a junction at Goldsboro, marched northward to Washington. The corps was discon 
tinued on August 1, 1865, many of the regiments having Ixnm mustered out before that. 



108 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

TWENTY-FOURTH CORPS. 

BERMUDA HUNDRED ; FORT FISHER ; PETERSBURG ; HATCHER S RUN, March 30th ; FORT 
GREGG ; RICE S STATION ; FALL OF RICHMOND ; CLOVER HILL ; APPOMATTOX. 

The white troops of the Tenth and Eighteenth Corps were assembled in one command, 
and organized, December 3, 1864, as the Twenty-fourth Corps, with Major-General Edward 
O. Ord in command. The troops of the Tenth Corps were assigned to the First and Second 
Divisions, while the regiments of the Eighteenth Corps were placed in the Third Division. 
The three divisions were commanded by Generals Foster, Ames and Devens, and were 
stationed on the north bank of the James, in front of Richmond. As before the consolida 
tion, these troops remained in the Army of the James. 

Ames (2d) Division did not remain long in the corps In December, 1864, it left its 
quarters and embarked for North Carolina, forming part of Butler s expedition to Fort 
Fisher. Butler s troops returned without having accomplished anything ; but, in January, 
Ames three brigades were ordered to return to Fort Fisher, this second expedition being 
entrusted to the command of General Alfred H. Terry, the former commander of the Tenth 
Corps. Abbott s Brigade, of the First Division, also accompanied Terry s Expedition. These 
troops Ames Division and Abbott s Brigade - - were the ones which won the famous victory 
at Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865. They never rejoined the Twenty-fourth Corps, but 
remained in North Carolina, where they formed a nucleus for a revival of the organization of 
the Tenth Corps. 

In December, 1864, while Ames Division was absent on the first expedition to Fort 
Fisher, the Twenty-fourth Corps was reinforced by the First Division, Eighth Corps. This 
was a veteran body of troops - - formerly Thoburn s Division - - which had seen long and 
active service in West Virginia and in the Shenandoah Valley. It was transferred to the 
Twenty-fourth Corps, the fighting in the Valley having ended, and arrived December 25th on 
the banks of the James, where it took possession of the abandoned quarters of the Fort 
Fisher division. These troops from West Virginia (t) regiments) were designated an Inde 
pendent Division, and General John W. Turner, formerly a division-general in the Tenth 
Corps, was assigned to its command. The Twenty-fourth Corps now consisted of three 
divisions, Foster s, Devens and Turner s, containing 42 infantry regiments, and numbering 
18,148 present for duty, equipped. 

On January 1, 1865, General Butler was relieved from the command of the Army of the 
James -- Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Corps and General Ord was appointed in his 
place. Major-General John Gibbon, an able and distinguished division-general of the Second 
Corps, became the commander of the Twenty-fourth. But little fighting had occurred on the 
north bank of the James since the organization of the corps, except a minor affair at Spring 
Hill, December 10, 1864, in which Longstreet made a sortie against the extreme right of the 
Union line. 

On the 27th of March, 1865, Foster s and Turner s Divisions of the Twenty-fourth Corps, 
with one division of the Twenty-fifth, all under command of General Ord, Army of the James 
(General Gibbon commanding his corps), crossed to the south banks of the James and Appo- 
mattox Rivers, and joined the main army at Hatcher s Run, where they participated in the 
preliminary movements of the final, grand campaign. In the general and victorious assault 
on Petersburg, April 2, 1865, the Twenty-fourth Corps was assigned to the duty of assaulting 
Forts Gregg and Whitworth, which they carried by a determined and brilliant attack ; but 
not without a serious loss, and a final struggle in which bayonets were used. General Gibbon 
describes this assault as one of the most desperate in the war. 



THK TWENTY-FIFTH CORPS. 109 

The full of Petersburg immediately followed as the result of the victorious assaults of the 
Twenty-fourth, Sixth, and Ninth Corps, after which the Twenty-fourth joined in tin* pursuit 
of Lee s Army. During this pursuit it had a sharp tight, April Oth, at Rice s Station, or Higli 
Bridge. On April Dth, the day of Lee s surrender, the corps was sharply engaged in the 
forenoon, the Twenty-fourth Corps having the honor of making the last infantry fight of that 
campaign, and of the war. Gibbon arrived at Appomattox Court House about ten o clock, 
and intercepted Lee s troops who were driving the cavalry back in their attempt to escape. 
General Ord, commanding at that time the Twenty-fourth, Fifth, and Twenty-fifth (colored) 
Corps, states that the arrival of his command was opportune; that "in spite of General 
Sheridan s attempts, the cavalry was falling back in confusion before Lee s infantry;" and 
that his troops "soon deployed and went in, Gibbon at double-quick, with Foster s and 
Turner s Divisions in beautiful style." After a short, sharp action a white flagapi>eared at an 
adjoining part of Ord s line, whereupon the Twenty-fourth Corps was ordered to cease firing. 
The last infantry-volley of the war had been fired. This fight, on the day of Leo s surrender, 
was known by the troops as Clover Hill. During this campaign, March 2 .th to April th, 
- from Hatcher s Run to Appomattox -- the Twenty-fourth Corps lost 1-i J killed, and 505 
wounded ; total, 714. 

When General Ord moved the Army of the James to Petersburg, March 27, 1805, ho left 
Devens (3d) Division of the Twenty-fourth, and one division of the Twenty-fifth, in front of 
Richmond, on the north bank of the James. Upon the fall of Petersburg these troops, under 
General Weitzel, the commander of the Twenty-fifth Corps, marched on Richmond, and 
encountering little or no opposition entered that city on the 3d of April. Foster s and Turner s 
Divisions returned to Richmond after the victory at Appomattox, and the corps remained in 
Virginia until August 1, 1S05, when the existence of the organization ceased officially, many 
of the regiments having already returned to their homes. Although this corps does not dis 
play any long list of battles, it should be remembered that its regiments were veterans of 
many hard-fought fields before they were assigned to it. They had withstood the shock of 
many battles, and their banners were inscribed with the names of historic fields. 

TWENTY-FIFTH CORPS. 

BERMUDA HUNDRED ; FORT FISHER ; PETERSBURG ; HATCHER S RUN* ; FORT GREGG ; FALL 
OP RICHMOND ; RICE S STATION ; CLOVER HILL ; APPOMATTOX. 

This organization was composed of the colored troops previously belonging to the Tenth 
and Eighteenth Corps, and which were consolidated for the purpose of forming an Army 
Corps composed entirely of black regiments. It was organized December 3, 1804, and Major- 
General Godfre) Weitzel was placed in command. 1 1 was composed of the divisions of Gi n 
erals Kautz, Birney (Wm.), and Paine, containing in all 32 regiments of infantry and 1 of 
cavalry. Its returns for February, 1805, show a strength of 13,030 infantry, cavalry, and 
artillery, the latter carrying 5(5 guns. 

In January, 1805, Paine s Division sailed with Terry s Expedition to Fort Fisher, where 
it rendered effective service during that memorable action, although it did not form a part of 
the column of assault. Paine s Division did not rejoin the corps, but remained in North Car 
olina, and when the Tenth Corps was reorganized became the Third Division of that corps. 

On the 27th of March, 1805, Birney s (2d) Division accompanied the Army of the James 

-General Ord s command --on its marcl i from the James River to Hatcher s Run, Kautz 

(1st) Division remaining in the defenses of Bermuda Hundred. Birney s Division was present 

in the fighting at the fall of Petersburg, after which it joined in the pursuit of Lee s Army, 

and participated in the closing battle at Clover Hill, April yth, the day of Lee s surrender. 



110 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

In the meantime, Kautz Division accompanied General Weitzel to Richmond, the colored 
troops of the Twenty-fifth Corps being the first to enter that city. In May, 1805, the corps 
accompanied General Weitzel to Texas, where it joined the Army of Occupation, and 
remained until January 8, 1860, when the corps was discontinued, it being the last corps 
mustered out. Many of the regiments had been previously mustered out in the summer and 

fall of 1865. 

In addition to the list of battles belonging properly to the Twenty-fifth Corps, the col 
ored regiments of that command had fought with honor at the Petersburg Assault, the Mine 
Explosion at Deep Bottom, Chaffiirs Farm, Fort Gilmer, Darbytowii Road, and Fair Oaks. 



CAVALRY CORPS. 
(ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.) 

STONEMAN S RAID ; CHANCELLORSVILLE ; GREENWICH ; BEVERLY FORD ; ALDIE ; MIDDLE- 
BURG ; UPPERVILLE ; HANOVER ; GETTYSRURG ; MONTEREY ; FAIRFIELD ; HAGERSTOWN ; WIL- 
LIAMSPORT ; BOONSBORO ; FALLING WATERS ; SHEPHERDSTOWN ; MANASSAS GAP ; KELLY S 
FORD ; BRANDY STATION : CULPEPER ; RACCOON FORD ; WHITE S FORD ; RAPIDAN ; JAMES 
Cm ; WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS ; BUCKLAND S MILLS ; STEVENSBURG ; MINE RUN ; AVERELL S 
RAID ; BARNETT S FORD ; KILPATRICK S RAID ; KAUTZ RAID ; PARKER S STORE ; TODD S TAV 
ERN ; NORTH ANNA ; SOUTH ANNA ; YELLOW TAVERN ; MEADOW BRIDGE ; MILFORD STATION ; 
HAWES SHOP ; HANOVER COURT HOUSE ; ASHLAND ; OLD CHURCH ; COLD HARBOR ; TREVIL- 
IAN STATION ; ST. MARY S CHURCH ; WHITE HOUSE LANDING ; NOTTOWAY COURT HOUSE ; STONY 
CREEK ; WILSON S RAID ; REAM S STATION ; STAUNTON BRIDGE ; MOOREFIELD ; LURAY ; WHITE 
POST ; SMITHFIELD ; BERRYVILLE ; OPEQUON ; WOODSTOCK ; WAYNESBORO ; NEW MARKET ; 
TOM S BROOK ; CEDAR CREEK ; HATCHER S RUN ; NEWTOWN ; ROOD S HILL ; DARBYTOWN 
ROAD ; BKLLEFIELD ; SHERIDAN S RAID ; MOUNT CRAWFORD ; DINWIDDIE COURT HOUSE ; FIVE 
FORKS ; AMELIA SPRINGS ; SAILOR S CREEK ; CLOVER HILL ; APPOMATTOX. 

This list covers only the more important of the numerous battles in which the Cavalry of 
the Army of the Potomac were engaged. It would be almost impossible to enumerate all the 
minor actions and affairs in which it participated, as not a day passed but, somewhere, at 
least, a battalion or regiment was under fire. From Beverly Ford to Appomattox, a "dead 
cavalryman " could have been seen any day of the year in answer to Hooker s famous query. 

The first organization of the cavalry into one command was made in April, 1803, and 
Major-General George Stoneman was placed at its head. It numbered 11,402 men present 
for duty, and was divided into three commands under Generals Pleasanton, Buford and 
Averell. Stoiieman s corps made a raid on the enemy s rear during the Chancellorsville cam 
paign, but, owing to various causes, the movement did not produce the favorable results 
expected. Hooker, being dissatisfied, relieved Stoneman and put Major-General Alfred Pleas 
anton in his place. 

On June 9, 1803, the corps was engaged at Beverly s Ford. Va., in a battle which was 
largely a cavalry affair on both sides. From this battle dates the efficiency of the cavalry arm 
of the service in the war. Particular regiments had often demonstrated their efficiency on 
previous occasions, but until this battle the cavalry had not shown its ability to act as an 
independent body. Pleasanton took about 9,000 sabres to Beverly Ford, one-third of which, 
however, were not engaged , Duffle s Division having been detached to hold a position else 
where. The three divisions were commanded bv Generals Buford, Duffle and Gregg. A 



CAVALRY CORPS. 1 1 1 

proper compliment of horse artillery was attached, and two brigades of infantry were also 
present in support. Casualties at Beverly s Ford, 484 killed and wounded, not including cap 
tured or missing. 

More hard fighting occurred at Aldie and Middleburg(June 1 7th and I . th), one of the passes 
of the mountains which screened Lee s advance into Pennsylvania, the cavalry losing in these 
two actions 6*3 killed, 177 wounded, and 10 1 missing; total, 404. At Gettysburg, the Cav 
alry Corps was still under Pleasanton s command, with Buford, Gregg and Kilpatrick as 
division-generals, and numbered 11,000 sabres and 27 guns. Two brigades of horse artillery 
- Robertson s and Tidball s, 9 batteries - - were attached to the corps previous to this cam 
paign. Cavalry fought with cavalry at Gettysburg, the fighting occurring mostly on the 
extreme right of the Union line. Kilpatrick had a fight, also, on the left, in which General 
Farnsworth was killed. The casualties in the Cavalry Corps at Gettysburg amounted to no 
killed, 352 wounded, and 199 captured or missing;* total, (541, the heaviest loss falling on 
Ouster s Michigan Brigade. Buford s Division had the honor of opening this historic battle, 
his long skirmish-line of dismounted troopers holding the enemy at bay until the First Corps 
arrived on the field. The Cavalry made some brilliant charges during the course of this bat 
tle, in which sabre cuts were freely exchanged. 

Upon the reorganization of the Army of the Potomac, in April, 1804, Major-General 
Philip H. Sheridan was placed in command of the Cavalry Corps. The three divisions were 
commanded by Generals Torbert, Gregg (D. M.), and Wilson, and contained 32 regiments of 
cavalry, numbering 12,424, "present for duty, equipped." This does not include the cavalry - 
1812 in number attached to the Ninth Corps ; nor the horse artillery which acted in con 
junction with the mounted troops. The campaign of 1804 was marked by the hardest fighting 
and greatest loss of life which had hitherto fallen to the lot of this arm of service. Most of 
the time it was cavalry fighting cavalry, in large numbers, by brigades and divisions. As the 
men fought dismounted and with carbines, the battles closely resembled infantry engagements, 
and being well supplied with horse artillery there was but little difference in the character of 
the fighting. Among the more important of these dismounted cavalry battles in Grant s 
campaign, might be mentioned Todd s Tavern, May 8 ; Hawes Shop, May 28 ; Trevilian 
Station, June 11 ; St. Mary s Church, June 24 ; Dinwiddie Court House, March 31 ; Five 
Forks, April 1 ; and Appomattox, April 9, 1805. 

In August, 1804, Sheridan was promoted to the command of the Army of the Shenandoah, 
and took with him the First and Third Cavalry Divisions -- Merritt s and Wilson s. General 
Torbert was assigned to the command of the cavalry forces in the Shenandoah, and his two 
divisions were reenforced by Duftie s and Averell s Cavalry Divisions of the Army of West 
Virginia. The cavalry fighting in the Shenandoah was a series of brilliant affairs, interspersed 
with skirmishes, which cost the corps a serious loss of life. 

Upon Sheridan s return to Petersburg he brought back with him Devin s and Ouster s 
Divisions, which, added to Crooks (formerly Gregg s) Division, restored the organization to its 
original formation, General Merritt being in command of the three divisions. The corps 
started on the final campaign of 1805 with 37 regiments of cavalry, numbering 13,820 present 
for duty, or about 11,000 carbines available for action. During the last ten days of the cam 
paign -- from Five Forks to Appomattox --the corps took a prominent and meritorious part 
in the operations which culminated in the surrender of lyre s Army. The cavalry were a 
conspicuous and attractive feature of the Grand Review at Washington, after the close of the 
war. Soon after that event, most of the regiments were mustered out of service. 

Among the heavy losses of the cavalry the following casualties are worthy of note ; they 
indicate clearly the hard fighting done by this arm of the service. 

* Not includhiK loss of captured men (6th U. S. Cavalry) at Fairfickl, Fa. 



112 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Captured 
Killed. Wounded, and Missing. Total. 

Beverly Ford, Va., June 9, 1863_ 81 403 382 866 

Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-i, 1863. 90 352 407 849 

Gettysburg campaign, June 12 July 24, not including Get 
tysburg 219 866 1,471 2,556 

Brandy Station, Va., Aug. 1, 1863. 21 104 20 145 

Mine Run, Va., Nov. 26 Dec. 2, 1863. 28 119 77 224 

Wilderness, Va., May 5-7, 1864. 97 416 197 710 

Hawes Shop, Old Church, Ashland; Aeiion Church, Va., 

etc., May 25-30, 1864. 110 450 96 656 

Cold Harbor, Va., May 31 June 6, 1864. 51 70 449 

Sheridan s First Expedition, Va., May 9-24, 1864, Beaver 

Dam Station, Yellow Tavern, Meadow Bridge, etc. . 64 337 224 625 

Trevilian Raid, Va., June 7-24, 1864. 150 738 624 1,512 

Wilson s Raid, Va., June 22-30, 1864. 71 262 1,119 1,452 

Deep Bottom, Weldon Railroad, Reams Station, Petersburg, 

etc., Va., August 1-30, 1864. 64 269 122 455 

Chaffin s Farm, Peebles Farm, etc., Va., Sept. 1-30, 1864. 24 121 336 481_ 

Shenandoah campaign, 1864; Opequon, Tom s Brook, Cedar 

Creek, and 26 other engagements. 454 2,817 646 3,917 

Fall of Petersburg and Pursuit of Lee, March 29 April 9, 

1865 221 930 339 1,490 

It will be observed that over one-fourth of these losses are made up of captured, or 
missing, men. This was unavoidable, as the cavalry operated almost entirely within the 
enemy s lines, and without the support of other troops. Repeatedly, they made daring raids, 
which carried them a long distance from their own army, and in which any small detachment 
was always liable to be cut off by the vigilant enemy which hovered around the flanks and rear 
of the raiding column. 

The cavalry of the Union Armies, including both Eastern and Western, lost 10,596 officers 
and men killed or mortally wounded in action, and about 26,490 wounded who survived. 

CAVALRY CORPS. 
(ARMIES OF THE WEST.) 

STONE S RIVER, TENN. ; MCMINNVILLE, TENN. ; PEA RIDGE, ARK. ; LONE JACK, Mo. ; PRAIRIE 
GROVE, Mo. ; STREIGHT S RAID ; MIDDLETON, TENN. ; FRANKLIN, TENN. ; TRIUNE, TENN. ; 
SHELBYVILLE, TENN.; JACKSON, TENN.; SPARTA, TENN.; CANTON, Miss.; GRENADA, Miss.; 
GRIERSON S RAID ; GRAYSVILLE, GA. ; CHICKAMAUGA, GA. ; CARTER S STATION, TENN. ; MUR- 
FREESBORO ROAD, TENN.; FARMINGTON, TENN.; BLUE SPRINGS, TENN.; BYHALIA, MlSS. ; 
AVYATT S FORD, Miss.; MAYSVILLE, ALA.; BLOUNTSVILLE, TENN.; SWEETWATER, TENN.; 
Moscow, TENN.; CLEVELAND, TENN.; RIPLEY, Miss.; SALISBURY, TENN.; BEAN S STATION, 
TENN. ; MORRISTOWN, TENN. ; MOSSY CREEK, TENN. ; DANDRIDGE, TENN. ; FAIR GARDENS, TENN. ; 
ARKADELPHIA, ARK. ; CAMDEN, ARK. ; PRAIRIE D ANN, ARK. ; JENKINS FERRY, ARK. ; NATCHI- 
TOCHES, LA.; WILSON S FARM, LA.; SABINE CROSS ROADS, LA.; CANE RIVER, LA.; RED CLAY, 
GA. ; RESACA, GA. ; VARNELL S STATION, GA. ; TILTON, GA. ; ROME, GA. ; DALLAS, GA. ; KINGS 
TON, GA.; KENESAW, GA.; DECATUR, GA.; ACKWORTH, GA.; MCAFFEE S CROSS ROADS, GA.; 
POWDER SPRINGS, GA.; NOONDAY CREEK, GA. ; LOVEJOY S STATION, GA.; NEWNAN, GA.; 
HILLSBORO, GA. ; FAIRBURN, GA. ; RED OAK, GA. ; JONESBORO, GA. ; PULASKI, TENN. ; CYPRESS 
RIVER, GA. ; BRICE S CROSS ROADS, Miss. ; TUPELO, Miss. ; HURRICANE CREEK, Miss. ; BOONE- 



CAVALRY CORPS. 113 

VILLE, Mo.; LITTLE BLUE, Mo.; INDEPENDENCE, Mo.; Bio BLUK, Mo.; OSAGK RIVER, Mo.; 
FRANKLIN, TENN.; NASHVILLE, TENN. ; RUTHERFORD S CRKKK, TKXN.; PULASKI, TENN.; EGYPT 
STATION, Miss.; MOUNT STERLING, KY.; SALTVILLK, VA.; SHERMAN S MARCH TO THE SEA.; 
GRISWOLDVILLE, GA.; WAYNESBORO, GA.; OGEECHEE RIVER, (JA.; THE CAROLINAS; SALKA- 
HATCHIE RIVER, S. C.; ROCKINGHAM, N. C.; SOLEMN GROVE, N. C.; AVERASBORO, N. C.; 
BENTONVILLE, N. C.; STONEMAN S RAID; PLANTERSVILLE, ALA.; SELMA, ALA.; TUSCALOOSA, 
ALA.; MONTGOMERY, ALA.; COLUMBUS, GA. ; MACON, GA.; TALLADEGA, ALA.; IRWINSVILLE, 
GA. (CAPTURE OF JEFFERSON DAVIS). 

In the Western Armies there was no corps organization composed of cavalry until 
Dcn-mlirr. lM 4, ah h< >u-li there were divisions of mounted troops in each military depart 
meiit. Hence the list of cavalry battles given here embraces those which occurred in all the 
operations west of the Allcghanies. It includes only the more important engagements of the 
cavalry ; it would be impossible to give all of them. The constant activity of scouting 
parties ; the aggressive vigilance of the mounted troops at the outposts ; the daring raids 
through hostile territory ; and the continuous forays incidental to border warfare, resulted in 
countless fights which cannot be enumerated here. These minor affairs were characterized 
by courageous, desperate fighting, and though the casualty lists were small, the loss of life in 
the aggregate was a serious feature of the war. Many fell in contests which are umnen- 
tioned in history, fighting in nameless battles, and filling unmarked graves. 

In December, 18(54, while on Thomas s campaign in Tennessee against Hood, the mounted 
troops were formed into an Army Corps of seven divisions, and Major-General J. H. Wilson 
was assigned to its command. At the battle of Nashville, four of these divisions-- McCook s, 
Hatch s, Johnson s and Knipe s were present. After the defeat and dismemberment of 
Hood s Army, Wilson entered Alabama with his corps of troopers in March, 18(55, and 
there fought the closing battles of the war. His four divisions were there commanded by 
Generals McCook, Hatch, Long and Upton. Although the last infantry engagement of the 
war occurred April S), 18(55, Wilson s Corps fought at Columbus, Ga., on the 10th of April, 
1865, in a spirited engagement with Forrest s command. The most of Wilson s men fought 
dismounted, and the affair-- during which a daring and successful assault was made 
on the enemy s works was one of the brilliant achievements of the war. About this time, 
also, General Stoneman, with a body of cavalry under Generals Gillem a-nd Burbridge, made 
a raid through East Tennesee into Virginia. 

During Sherman s Atlanta campaign, the cavalry attached to his army was divided into 
four columns, commanded by Generals Stoneman, Kilpatrick, Garrard and McCook (E. M.). 
Kilpatrick s Division afterwards accompanied that part of Sherman s Army which marched 
through Georgia to the Sea, and thence through the Carolinas. 

In 1803, the cavalry attached to the Army of the Cumberland operated as a separate 
command, instead of being parceled out to brigades as previously. At Stone s River it was 
massed under the command of General David S. Stanley, its casualties in that battle amount 
ing to 38 killed, 103 wounded, and 215 missing or captured ; total, 350. It also lost 37 hoi-ses 
killed and 40 wounded. At Chickamauga, the cavalry forces were commanded by General 
Robert B. Mitchell, and comprised two divisions under Generals E. M. McCook and George 
Crook. The casualties in the Cavalry Corps at that battle aggregated 32 killed, 130 wounded, 
and 300 captured or missing : total, 4(58. 

In the Department of the Gulf, the cavalry attached to Banks s Red River Expedition, 
April, 1864, was commanded by General All>ert L. Lee, and comprised five brigades. Gen 
eral Lee was succeeded by General Richard Arnold. During Grant s Mississippi campaigns, 
Generals W. S. Smith and Cyrus Bussey were entrusted with important cavalry commands. 

a 



CHAPTER IX. 



FAMOUS DIVISIONS AND BEIGADES. 



V\/ ITH1N the corps organizations there were certain divisions and brigades which also 
achieved distinction, sometimes greater than that of the corps to which they belonged. 
Prominent among these was the famous division of the Pennsylvania Reserves - - the only 
division of three years men in the Union Armies which was composed entirely of troops from 
one State. 

PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES. 

The Reserves included thirteen regiments of infantry, divided into three brigades. The 
Thirteenth Reserves was the celebrated regiment known as the Bucktails, or First Pennsylva 
nia Rifles. In addition to the infantry, two other regiments were organized in connection 
with the division, the First Pennsylvania Cavalry and the First Pennsylvania Light Artil 
lery - - but after a few months they were detached, and the division proper included only the 
three brigades of infantry. The Reserves were prominently engaged at Dranesville, Mechan- 
icsville, Gaines s Mill, Charles City Cross Roads (Glendale), Manassas, South Mountain, Antie- 
tam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and in the Wilderness campaign. At Fredericksburg the 
division made a gallant fight, the losses being unusually severe in proportion to the number 
engaged. The division was commanded in turn by Generals McCall, Reynolds, Meade, and 
Crawford. It was attached, originally, to the First (McDowell s) Corps, but while on the 
Peninsula it served in the Fifth Corps. At Manassas, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, it was 
again in the First Corps. After Fredericksburg it was ordered to Washington to rest and 
recruit its shattered regiments, but it rejoined the Army on the Gettysburg campaign, when 
it was assigned to the Fifth Corps, in which it remained until mustered out. 

The casualties in this division do not amount to the heroic aggregate shown by some 
other divisions, but the percentage of loss was heavy ; the regiments became reduced in 
numbers, received but few recruits, and did not re-enlist. Governor Curtin requested the 
War Department to furlough the regiments, a few at a time promising that the State of 
Pennsylvania would return them to the field with full ranks ; but the Government refused. 
Many of the men, however, reenlisted, and when the division returned home at the expira 
tion of its three years, these reenlisted veterans, together with the recruits, were organized 
into two regiments, the One Hundred and Ninetieth and One Hundred and Ninety-first 
Pennsylvania --which served until the war ended. The battle of Bethesda Church, June 1, 
] 864, was the last action in which the Reserves, as a division, were engaged. 

Two of the Reserve regiments served in West Virginia during the early part of 1864, dis 
tinguishing themselves at the battle of Cloyd s Mountain. The eleven remaining regiments 
were formed into two brigades, constituting Crawford s (3d) Division, Fifth Corps. 

(114) 



FAMOUS DIVISIONS AND BUKJADES. us 



SYKES S DIVISION. 

Another division remarkable for superiority in discipline and efficiency, was Sykes s 
Division of Regulars. The regular troops of the United States Army serving in the Army of 
the Potomac were formed into one division of two brigades, under command of Major-General 
George Sykes, who was succeeded in 1803 by General Romeyn B. Ayres. This division in 
cluded the Second, Third, Fourth, Sixth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Fourteenth, and Seven 
teenth United States Infantry. The regiments were small, seldom having over eight 
companies to a regiment, and often only three. At Gaines s Mill, and at Gettysburg, they 
sustained a terrible percentage of loss. The division became so reduced in numbers that it 
was withdrawn from the field in 1864. The largest losses in the division occurred in the 
Fourteenth Infantry ; but that might have been due to larger numbers. The Regular Division 
was, undoubtedly, the best officered of any division in the Army, the officers being selected 
solely with reference to their ability. In addition to those from the National Military 
Ac;idMii\ . a large miiiilii-r were |u-nii. >!.(! from ili ranks. 

Attached to the division of Regulars was an additional brigade, composed of volunteer 
regiments, which had demonstrated by their discipline and efficiency their tit ness to 1x3 asso 
ciated with the Regulars. Conspicuous among the volunteer regiments thus attached to the 
Regular Division was the Fifth New York, or Duryee Zouaves General Wan-en s old 
regiment. 



HANCOCK S DIVISION. 

But the hardest fighting and greatest loss of life occurred in the First Division of the 
( or].-. - Hancock s old division --in which more men were killed and wounded than 
in any other division in the Union Army, east or west. Its losses aggregated 2.2*7 killed, 
11,72-4 wounded,* and 4,833 missing ; total, 18,844. This division was the one which Rich 
ardson --its first commander led on the Peninsula, and at whose head he fell at Antietam ; 
the one which, under Hancock, made the bloody assault on Ma rye s Heights; which, under 
Caldwell, fought so well in the Gettysburg wheat-field ; which, under Barlow, surged over 
the enemy s works at Spotsylvania ; and which, under Miles, was in at the death in 18(55. 
Within its ranks were the Irish Brigade, and crack regiments like the Fifth New Hampshire, 
the One Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania, and the Sixty-fourth New York. Over 14,<mo 
men were killed or wounded in this division "during the war ; yet it never numbered 8,0oo 
muskets, and often could muster only half of that. After the charge on Marye s Heights 
it numbered only 2,800. 

Close to it, however, in point of loss stands Gibbon s (2d) Division f of the Second Corps, 
and Griffin s (1st) Division:}: of the Fifth Corps. 

The heaviest loss sustained by any division in anyone battle, occurred in Getty s (2di 
Division, Sixth Corps, at the Wilderness, where that divison lost 480 killed, 2,318 wounded, 
and 196 missing ; total, 2,994. 

Gibbon s Division, at Gettysburg, lost 344 killed, 1.1 :7 wounded, and 101 missing ; total, 
i,642, out of 3,773 engaged a loss of 43.5 per cent. 



Including the mortally wounded, t Formerly Sudgwick s. J Formerly Morell n. 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES i\ THE CIVIL WAR. 



VERMONT BRIGADE. 

The greatest loss of life in any one brigade during the war occurred in the Vermont 
Brigade of the Second (Getty s) Division, Sixth Corps. The regiments composing this organ 
ization, and their losses were : - 

Killed or 
Died of Wounds. 

2d Vermont Infantry 224 

3d Vermont Infantry 206 

4th Vermont Infantry 162 

5th Vermont Infantry 213 

6th Vermont Infantry . . . 203 

llth Vermont (1st H. Art y) ... 164 

Total (during the war) 1,172 

Its hardest fighting occurred at the Wilderness, May, 5-6, 1864, in which action it 
lost 195 killed, 1,017 wounded, and 57 missing; total, 1,269. Within a week it lost at the 
two actions of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, 266 killed, 1,299 wounded, and 80 missing; 
a total of 1,645, out of the 2,800 effective men* with which it crossed theRapidan, and a loss 
of 58 per cent. This loss fell on the first five regiments, as the Eleventh did not join the 
brigade until May 15, 1864. The brigade also distinguished itself by valuable services ren 
dered in the minor actions of Banks s Ford, Va., and Funkstowii, Md. 

It acquired a distinctive reputation, not only by its gallantry, but by reason of its being 
composed entirely of troops from one state. State brigades were rare in the Union Armies, 
the policy of the Government being to assign regiments from different states to the same 
brigade. Carroll s Brigade (Second Corps) contained, at one time, regiments from seven dif 
ferent states. In the Confederate Army an opposite policy prevailed, and, so far as possible, 
regiments from the same states were grouped in brigades. Another thing which enabled the 
Vermont Brigade to win its prominent place in history was its continuous, unbroken organi 
zation. It was formed at the beginning of the war with five regiments which served 
together through the entire war. When their term of enlistment expired, in 1864, they 
re-enlisted, and thus preserved the existence of the brigade. The only change in the organi 
zation was the addition of the Eleventh Regiment (1st Vt. H. Art y) which joined in May, 
1864, it having served previously in the forts about Washington. This feature of a continu 
ous organization is an important one in view of the fact that it was the only one, out of two 
hundred or more brigades, which served through the war without being broken up, or reor 
ganized. The same five regiments of the old Vermont Brigade which picketed the Potomac 
in 1861, marched together at the Grand Review in 1865. It was commanded successively by 
General Wm. F. Smith, formerly of the Third Vermont ; General W. T. Brooks ; Col. Henry 
Whiting, Second Vermont ; and General Lewis A. Grant, formerly of the Fifth Vermont. 
At one time the Twenty-sixth New Jersey, a nine months regiment, was attached to the brig 
ade for a few months, but it was a temporary arrangement only. The "old" Brigade 
should not be confounded with the Vermont Brigade (Stannard s) which was so prominently 
engaged at Gettysburg. This latter organization was in the First Corps, and was composed 
of nine months troops, Gettysburg being its only battle. 

* Adjuttmt Gonerars liuport, Vermont ; 1SC4. 



FAMOUS DIVISIONS AND BKIUADKS. 117 

IRON BRIGADE. 

Equally good fighting was done by the famous 4i Iron Brigade of the West," First Divis 
ion, First Corps. Its record is, also, a heroic one. 

Killed ami 
Died of Wounds. 

2d Wisconsin Infantry 238 

6th Wisconsin Infantry 244 

7th Wisconsin Infantry I M 

19th Indiana Infantry IT 1 .* 

24th Michigan Infantry 1-:* 



Total (during the war) 1,131 



In proportion to its numbers this brigade sustained the heaviest loss of any in the war. 
The brigade proper contained only the five regiments mentioned ; and, yet, its aggregate of 
losses is exceeded in only one instance. At Manassas, under command of General (ribbon, 
the first four regiments named lost 148 killed, 626 wounded, and 120 missing ; total, 894, out 
of about 2,000 engaged. At Gettysburg, General Meredith commanding, the five regi 
ments were engaged, losing 162 killed, 724 wounded, and 267 missing ; a total of 1,153 casual 
ties, out of 1,883 engaged, or 61 percent. Most of the missing at Gettysburg were killed or 
wounded. The Iron Brigade was also hotly engaged at South Mountain, Antietam, The 
Wilderness and Spotsylvania. It was organized in August, 1861, at which time it was com 
posed of the three Wisconsin regiments and the Nineteenth Indiana. In October, 1862, the 
Twenty-fourth Michigan was added. The Second Wisconsin and Nineteenth Indiana did not 
reenlist, and so were mustered out, respectively, in June and August, 1864. During the Wil 
derness campaign the Seventh Indiana was attached to the brigade, but it was mustered out 
in August. The First New York Shaq)shooters Battalion was also attached to the brigade at 
one time, joining it in the fall of 1863. In February, 1865, the brigade was broken up, the 
Twenty-fourth Michigan having been ordered to Baltimore. The Sixth and Seventh Regi 
ments remained in the First Brigade, Third Division (Crawford s), Fifth Corps, while the 
Sharpshooters Battalion was assigned elsewhere. General John Gibbon commanded the 
Iron Brigade at Manassas, South Mountain, and Antietam ; General Meredith, at Gettys 
burg ; and General Cutler at the Wilderness. Cutler was succeeded in 1864, by General 
Edward S. Bragg, formerly Colonel of the Sixth Wisconsin --an officer of marked ability 
and an intrepid soldier. 

There was another organization, in the Army of the Potomac, known as the Iron Brigade, 
and it was in the same division with the " Iron Brigade of the West." It was composed of the 
Second United States Sharpshooters, the Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth, Thirtieth, and 
Eighty-fourth New York, forming Hatch s (1st) Brigade, First Division, First Corps. But 
the Twenty -second, Twenty-fourth, and Thirtieth New York were two years regiments, and 
were mustered out in May, 1863, thereby breaking up the organization. The Eighty-fourth 
New York (14th Brooklyn) was an exceptionally fine regiment, while the other regiments in 
the brigade made a reputation, also, as efficient commands. It seems strange that two 
brigades in the same division should adopt like synonyms ; but, in justice to Hatch s Brigade, 
it should be stated that it was the original Iron Brigade, and that Gibbon s Brigade was not 
known by that title until after Antietam, at which time it was so designated by a war cor 
respondent, who was apparently unaware of his lack of originality. 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



IRISH BRIGADE. 

The Irish Brigade was, probably, the best known of any brigade organization, it having 
made an unusual reputation for dash and gallantry. The remarkable precision of its evolu 
tions under fire ;* its desperate attack on the impregnable wall at Marye s Heights ; its 
never failing promptness on every field ; and its long continuous service, made for it a 
name inseparable from the history of the war. It belonged to the First Division of the 
Second Corps, and was numbered as the Second Brigade. The regiments which properly 
belonged to the Irish Brigade, together with their losses, were : - 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

63d New York Infantry _ 156 

69th New York Infantry,- 259 

88th New York Infantry, 151 

28th Massachusetts Infantry _ 250 

116th Pennsylvania Infantry . 145 

Total (during the war) 961 

The Irish Brigade lost over 4,000 men in killed and wounded ; it being more men than 
ever belonged to the brigade at any one time. With the exception of the Twenty-eighth 
Massachusetts, the regiments were small. At the start they were not recruited to the 
maximum, but left New York with about 800 men each. The three New York regiments 
became so reduced in numbers that, at Gettysburg, they were consolidated into two com 
panies each ; the One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania had been consolidated into four 
companies. 

The brigade, which was organized in 1861, consisted originally of three New York regi 
ments, which selected numbers corresponding to those of certain famous Irish regiments 
in the British Army. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania and Twenty-eighth 
Massachusetts were added in the fall of 1862. Each of the five regiments carried green flags, 
in addition to the national colors. While on the Peninsular and Antietam campaigns, the 
Twenty-Ninth Massachusetts was attached to the brigade, but after Antietam it was detached 
and its place was taken by the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts. In September, 1864, the 
remnant of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery was added ; but it was detached in 
February, 1865, and the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery took its place. In July, 1864, the 
One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania was transferred to the Fourth Brigade. But the Irish 
Brigade was composed, substantially, as above ; and, each of the regiments having reenlisted, 
its service was continuous and unbroken. It was commanded, in turn, by General Thomas 
Francis Meagher, Colonel Patrick Kelly (killed), General Thos. A.. Smyth f (killed), Colonel 
Richard Byrnes (killed), and General Robert Nugent. 

Mention should also be made of the following named brigades, and their losses : 



"A severe and well-sustained musketry contest then ensued, continuing until the ammunition was nearly expended, after which this 
brigade (Meagher s Irish Brigade), having suffered severely, losing many valuable officers and men, was relieved by the brigade of General 
Caldwell, which until this time had remained in support. Caldwell s Brigade advanced to within a short distance of the rear of Meagher s 
Brigade. The latter then broke by companies to the rear, and the former by companies to the front, and in this manner passed their respective 
lines." [Hancock s Official Report. Antietam.] 

t Killed while in command of another brigade. 



FAMOUS DIVISIONS AND BRIGADES. 119 

ITRST JERSEY BRIGADE. 
FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

1st New Jersey Infantry. 1.,:; 

2d New Jersey Infantry. <<; 

3d New Jersey Infantry. 1.,; 

4th New Jersey Infantry. IGl 

10th New Jersey Infantry. 93 

15th New Jersey Infantry. 240 

Total (during the war) 900 

THE EXCELSIOR BRIGADE. (SICKLES ). 
HOOKER S I^D) DIVISION, THIRD CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds, 

70th New York Infantry . . 190 

7 1st New York Infantry . 88 

72d New York Infantry 161 

73d New York Infantry 156 

74th New York Infantry . 130 

120th New York Infantry . 151 

Total (during the war) 876 

THE PHILADELPHIA BRIGADE. 
GIBBON S (2o) DIVISION, SECOND CORPS. 

This brigade was commanded at Gettysburg by General Alex. S. Webb, and was the 
one which so successfully withstood the brunt of the attack made by Pickett s Division : 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

69th Pennsylvania Infantry 178 

71st Pennsylvania Infantry. 101 

72d Pennsylvania Infantry. . I 1 - 

106th Pennsylvania Infantry. 104 

Total (during the war). 636 

The gallant little Iowa Brigade (Belknap s) of the Seventeenth Corps :- 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

llth Iowa Infantry. 93 

13th Iowa Infantry. I in 

15th Iowa Infantry. 126 

16th Iowa Infantry. 105 

Total (during the war). 443 



120 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Ouster s famous Cavalry Brigade, which sustained the highest percentage of loss of any 
brigade in the mounted service :- 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds, 

1st Michigan Cavalry 164 

5th Michigan Cavalry 141 

6th Michigan Cavalry 1 35 

7th Michigan Cavalry - - 85 

Total (during the war) 525 

THE "STAR" BRIGADE HECKMAN S. 
EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wotinds. 

25th Massachusetts Infantry - - - 161 

27th Massachusetts Infantry 137 

23d Massachusetts Infantry 84 

9th New Jersey Infantry 96 

55th Pennsylvania Infantry 208 

Total (during the war) 686 

In each of these brigades there were, at times, slight changes, unnecessary to specify 
here, as they were but temporary arrangements ; the brigades proper were organized as 
stated. Then there was the Maryland Brigade ; the Second Jersey Brigade ; the Eagle 
Brigade -- Mower s, of the Sixteenth Corps, which carried the live eagle; Wilder s Light 
ning Brigade, composed of mounted infantry ; and several crack brigades whose total losses, 
as brigades, cannot well be stated, owing to the many changes in their organizations. 

Here are three fine brigades, with rosters showing their organizations as they stood 
October 20, 1863, at the time the Army of the Cumberland was reorganized. The losses 
credited each regiment were incurred during their entire term of service, during which they 
served in other brigades and corps. These brigade organizations were not continuous and 
unchanged like those previously cited ; they are mentioned in this connection because they 
were noted brigades. 

STEEDMAN S* (!ST) BRIGADE. 

SHERIDAN S f (2o) DIVISION, FOURTH CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wotinds. 

36th Illinois 204 

44th Illinois- .. 135 

73d Illinois. 114 

74th Illinois.--. 83 

88th Illinois. 103 

22d Indiana. 153 

2.1st Michigan. 83 

2d Missouri _ 91 

15th Missouri . 115 

24th Wisconsin . Ill 



Total (during the war) 1,192 



* Known, also, as Kimball s ; and Opdycke s. t Afterwards, Newton s Division. 



FAMOUS DIVISION S AND BRIGADES. 121 

WILLICH S* (1ST) BRIGADE. 
WOOD S (3D) DIVISION, FOURTH CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

25th Illinois. 

35th Illinois. 109 

89th Illinois. 133 

32d Indiana... 171 

68th Indiana ... 39 

8th Kansas 105 

15th Ohio 179 

49th Ohio 

15th Wisconsin . * 

Total (during the war) 1,115 

BARKER S (3D) BRIGADE. 
SHERIDAN S (2o) DIVISION, FOURTH CORPS. 

Killed and 
Died of Wounds. 

22d Illinois Infantry. I*" 

27th Illinois Infantry. 112 

42d Illinois Infantry. 

51st Illinois Infantry 

79th Illinois Infantry. 
3d Kentucky Infantry. 

64th Ohio Infantry. 114 

65th Ohio Infantry. 
125th Ohio Infantryf- 

Total (during the war). 1,107 

The greatest percentage of loss in any brigade, in any one action during the war, occurred 
at Gettysburg, in Harrow s (1st) Brigade, Gibbon s (2d) Division, Second Corps. Its loss, as 
officially reported, was : - 

Killed. Wounded. \ Missing. Aggregate. 

19th Maine . -" 1 

15th Massachusetts . . 23 97 

1st Minnesota. 50 173 

82d New York (2d N. Y. S. M.) . 45 132 

Total - 147 568 48 763 

The four regiments took 1,246 officers and men into action a loss of 61 per cent. 
At Stone s River, the Regular Brigade (15th, 16th, 18th, 19th United States 

of Rousseau s Division, Fourteenth Corps, lost 94 killed, 489 wounded, and 47 nm 

total, 630, out of 1,566 engaged. 

* Willich was wounded at Resaca, and succeeded by Col. William H. Gibson. 

t Transferred subsequently to the First Brigade. 

t Including the mortally wounded. 

The Iron Brigade, also, lost 61 per cent, at Gettysburg ; but, the loss Includes 267, captr 



CHAPTER X. 



I 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



T is not claimed that these are the Three Hundred Fighting Regiments of the Army ; but, 
that they are three hundred regiments which evidently did considerable fighting. There were, 
undoubtedly, others which did equally good or, perhaps, better fighting, and their gallant ser 
vices will be fully recognized by the writers who are conversant with their history. But, for 
lack of other information, this chapter deals only with those which sustained the heaviest 
losses in battle. It includes every regiment in the Union Armies which lost over 130 in 
killed and died of wounds during the war, together with a few whose losses were somewhat 
smaller, but whose percentage of killed entitles them to a place in the list. It may be sug 
gested that large casualty lists are not necessarily indicative of the fighting qualities of a 
regiment ; that on many occasions regiments have rendered valuable service and achieved a 
brilliant success with but slight loss. Granted, as regards some particular action or instance ; 
but, in the long run active service brings its many scars ; where the musketry was the hot 
test, the dead lay thickest ; and there is no better way to find the fighting regiments than to 
follow up the bloody trail which marked their brave advance. 

The losses in these three hundred regiments have been compiled from their muster-out- 
rolls, and counted name by name ; the total of the deaths is, in each case, correct. At times, 
it was difficult to decide as to the company to which a death should be tallied : for men were 
often transferred from one company to another, and, where companies were consolidated, a 
dead man s name often appeared in two or more companies in the same regiment. 

Then, again, in dividing the deaths among the different battles it was sometimes difficult 
to ascertain the action in which the wound was received, as the date of death was often 
given, instead of the date when the wound was received. In such cases the death was tallied 
to the last battle previous to the man s death, that is, the last battle in which his regiment 
was engaged. In some instances the rolls bear the names of men marked simply as " killed 
in action ;" these are recorded here as killed at Place Unknown. But these inaccuracies are 
few and slight, leaving the main result substantially correct as to each regiment. 

In some regiments the rolls were in such condition, owing to the consolidation of com 
panies and accessions of new companies bearing the same letters as the old ones, or to the 
reorganization consequent upon the reeiilistment of the regiment, that the regular form of 
tabulation was not practicable, and, so, after stating the total number of deaths --omitting 
company losses the list of battles is given, accompanied by the official casualty lists of 
killed, wounded, and missing, instead of the number of " killed and died of wounds." Where 
the casualties are stated thus, in "killed, wounded, and missing," the wounded includes the 
mortally wounded. This must be borne in mind to properly understand the nature of the loss. 

Where it could be done with accuracy, the number of killed and mortally wounded in 
each action is given in the regimental tabulations of these three hundred regiments ; and this 
is done without confusing it with an additional statement of wounded and missing. The 

(122) 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 123 

number of wounded is not always an exact, definite statement, owing to the slightly wounded 
which are counted in some regiments and not in others. It is sometimes difficult to draw the 
line between wounds, slight injuries, and lack of injury. The missing is a still more indefinite 
quantity, including, as it does, the captured, the missing, the stragglers, and, very often, many 
of the killed and wounded. But there is nothing indefinite ahout the status of the dead 
soldier, and, so, for purpose of comparison, it is better that the losses of the various regiments 
be stated in killed or died of wounds," and in that only. 

When the total of the killed and died of wounds in any regiment is known, it is very easy 
to arrive at the number of its wounded, for the proportion, in the aggregate, is a definite and 
well known one, as has been previously shown.* True, this proportion will not always hold 
good for a regiment in the instance of some one battle ; but, in all the battles of a regiment it 
will be found correct, the variations correcting themselves in the aggregate. 

In these three hundred regiments, the title of each is accompanied by the name of its 
brigade, division, and corps. Of course, many regiments served in more than one brigade, 
and each brigade had several commanders. Still, in each case, the brigade mentioned will 
assist largely in identifying the regiment, or recalling to the hasty reader the campaigns in 
which it served. Lack of space debars the tedious details necessary to trace properly the 
changing organizations to which most regiments belonged. 

The loss by disease in Confederate prisons is stated in many instances, but, at the same 
time, it is included in the column of loss by disease, accidents, &c." 

In stating the total enrollments, care has been taken to subtract transferred men who 
were shifted from one company to another in the same regiment. Deductions are also made 
for men transferred to a regiment after the war had closed, many regiments having received 
large accessions from disbanded organizations just before their own muster-out. In com 
paring these enrollments with the muster-out-rolls, this fact must receive attention; other 
wise, there would be an apparent discrepancy. 

The bands are also omitted in the enrollments as stated here, as all regimental bands 
were ordered discontinued, and were mustered out during the summer of 1802. After that, 
no bands were enlisted, or paid as such, except brigade bands ; and, if a regiment had a band, 
it was formed of enlisted men, or company musicians, detailed for that purpose. 

In addition to the battles mentioned, in which a regiment lost men killed or mortally 
wounded, the engagements at which the regiments was " present " are also given. In some 
of the latter, losses were often sustained in wounded or missing men, but, as none of these 
wounded or missing are recorded among those who died of wounds, the battle does not 
appear in the tabulated list. In giving these additional battles at which a regiment was 
"Present, also," intentional omission is made of a certain class of minor affairs which are 
often used by regimental historians to unduly swell their list of battles, but which, if given 
here, would only confuse or mislead a disinterested reader. 

In the cavalry, however, these minor actions were so frequent, and resulted in so many 
casualties in wounded and captured men, that they form an important feature in the history 
of each mounted regiment. But the brief sketches given in the succeeding pages afford no 
room for the long and honorable list of additional actions in which each cavalry regiment 
participated, actions replete with meritorious details, although they did not result in any 
loss of life. Still, the reader should tear these facts in mind to rightly appreciate the services 
rendered by the mounted regiments. 

In most of the three hundred regiments mentioned in this chapter the figures opposite 
the list of battles show only the number who were killed or who died of wounds. The num 
ber of the killed, wounded, and missing, for the more important losses of each regiment, will 
be found in the notes appended in each case. 

See Page 94. 



124 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIRST MAINE CAVALRY. 
J. I. GREGG S BRIGADE, D. M. GREGG S DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN GODDARD. 

(2) COL. SAMUEL II. ALLEN. 



(3) COL. CALVIN S. DOUTY (Killed). 

(4) COL. CHARLES H. SMITH, BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, <fcc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Offlcerr. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 

2 



2 
I 

4 
i 

i 





i 




6 

7 
10 

12 

17 
19 

1 9 

9 
ii 

20 

7 

12 




3 
8 

7 

12 

*3 
21 

20 

19 
20 

II 

20 

7 
13 











I 



* 

* 

2 






29 

35 
2 3 

22 

3 

28 

27 
29 
24 
36 
36 
19 
3 


* 

2 9 

35 
2 3 

22 

3 

29 

27 
29 
24 
36 
36 

21 

3 


3 T 
266 

264 

234 
220 

233 

2 5 i 
260 

2I 5 

221 
247 
223 
230 




Company A...... 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Band 




J 5 


!59 


*74 


3 


34i 


344 


2,895 





BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



Middletown, Va., May 24, 1862 3 

Manassas, Va., Aug. 28, 1862 i 

South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862 i 

Louisa C. H., Va., May 2, 1863 2 

Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863 i 

Aldie, Va., June 1 7, 1 863 8 

Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863 u 

Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863 i 

Shepherdstovvn, Va., July 16, 1863 9 

Manassas, Va., Oct. 15, 1863 i 

Dahlgren Raid, Va., March -, 1864 10 

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 8, 1 864 i 

South Anna, Va., May 10, 1864 2 

Ashland, Va., May u, 1864 9 

Meadow Bridge, Va., May 12, 1864 i 

Hawes Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 i 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 2 

Skirmish, Va., June 19,1864 x 



White House, Va., June 21,1864 I 

St. Mary s Church, Va., June 24, 1864 17 

Gurley Farm, Va., June 25, 1864 i 

Picket, Va., Aug. 9, 1 864 i 

Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, 1 864 i 

Malvern Hill, Va., Aug. 16, 1864 4 

Charles City Road, Va., Aug. 1 8, 1864 3 

Reams Station, Va., Aug. 25, 1864 3 

Yellow Tavern, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 i 

Boydton Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 16 

Bellefield, Va., Dec. 10, 1864 i 

Dinwiddie C. H., Va., March 31, 1865 27 

Deatonsville, Va., April 6, 1865 7 

Sailor s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865 4 

Farrnville, Va., April 7, 1865 2 

Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865 7 

Picket Duty 2 

Place Unknown 1 1 



NOTES. This regiment sustained the heaviest loss, killed in action, of any cavalry regiment in the entire army. 
Besides the actions mentioned, it participated in several in which it lost men wounded or captured. Like all 
cavalry commands the First Maine lost many who were captured while on outpost duty, or while foraging and 
raiding. within the enemy s lines. Of these, 145 died of disease while in Confederate prisons. 

Colonel Douty, a brave and gallant officer, was killed while leading a successful charge at Aldie, Va. At St. 
Mary s Church, Va., the First Maine made a desperate fight against great odds, losing 10 officers and 56 men, 
killed, wounded, and missing, out of 260 who were engaged. Another hard fight occurred at the Boydton 
Road ; and at Cat Tail Run March 31, 1865 the regiment sustained its severest loss. In September, 1864, 
the First D. C. Cavalry was consolidated with it, bringing its numbers up to 1,800 men. 



TMKEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



125 



FIRST MAINE HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
MOTT S BRIGADE, BIKNEY S DIVISION, SECOND CORPS. 



(1)Coi.. DANIEL CHAPLIN (Killed) ; BVT. MAJ. GEN. 



(5)Coi.. RI SSELL B. SIIKI IIKHD ; BREV. Bni. (JEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DIHEASK, ACCIDENTS, IN PHI.HOX, A 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 



3 

2 

I 
2 

I 

3 

2 

2 
2 

4 






20 
4 6 

39 
3 
39 
36 

3 1 

28 

39 
28 
40 

2 3 


I 
20 

49 
4i 
3 2 
4i 
37 
34 
3 
4 
3 
44 
2 3 


I 










* 

I 








2 

2 9 
19 

3 

9 
20 

18 

23 
33 

I 2 

16 

20 

I? 


3 
29 

9 
30 

9 
20 

18 

2 3 
33 
3 
16 
20 

7 


22 

95 
198 

189 
,85 
.76 

83 

,85 

202 
172 
172 

161 

162 




B 


c 


D 


E . 


y 


G 


H 


I 


K 


I 


M 


Totals 


23 


400 


423 


2 


258 


260 


2.2O2 





423 killed 19.2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 1,283. Died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 21. 

BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Fredericksburg Pike, Va 147 

North Anna, Va 3 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 

Petersburg Assault, June i6th, i 7th 12 

Petersburg Assault, June iSth 210 

Jerusalem Road, Va 5 

Siege of Petersburg 7 

Present, also, at Cold Harbor ; Vaughn Road ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 



BATTLES. K.&.M.\V. 

Deep Bottom, Va 5 

Weldon Railroad 5 

Boydton Road, Va i o 

Hatcher s Run, March 25, 1 865 6 

Sailor s Creek, Va 5 

Picket Line 2 

Place Unknown 



NOTES. Of the 2,047 regiments in the Union Army, the First Maine Heavy Artillery sustained the greatest 
loss in battle. Not only was the number killed the largest, but the percentage of killed was exceeded in only 
one instance. Again, its loss at Petersburg, June i8th, was the greatest of any one regiment in any one action, 
during the war. It made the charge that day with about 900 muskets, losing 632* in killed and wounded. Only 
a month previous, the regiment had suffered a terrible loss in its gallant fight on the Fredericksburg Pike, near 
Spotsylvania, May 19, 1864, where it lost 82 killed and 394 wounded ; total, 476. Amjng the killed were six 
officers, and in the battle of June i8th, just referred to, thirteen officers were killed or mortally wounded, besides 
twelve others who were hit. This regiment was raised, principally, in the Penobscot Valley, and was organized 
August 21, 1862, as the Eighteenth Maine Infantry. Major Daniel Chaplin, of the Second Maine, was appointed 
Colonel. He fell, mortally wounded, August 18, 1864, at Strawberry Plains, Va. (Deep Bottom). The regiment 
left the State on August 24, 1862, and was changed to heavy artillery in December. It remained in the defences 
of Washington until May, 1864, when it joined Grant s Army at Spotsylvania. All its losses occurred within a 
period of ten months. During the spring campaign of 1865, it was in De Trobriand s Brigade of Mott s Divi 
sion, Second Corps. 

* The official report states the loss at 580 ; the Stato Reports put it at 60t 



126 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRD MAINE INFANTRY. 
WARD S BRIGADE, BIRNEY S DIVISION, THIRD CORPS. 



(1) Coi.. OLIVER O. HOWARD, OT. $., BVT. MAJOK-GEN. U. S. A. (2) COL. HENRY G. STAPLES. (3) COL. MOSES B. LAKEMAN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, ETC. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


2 

l 

2 


t 

I 



I 

3 


1 
12 
12 
IO 
12 
1 I 
2O 

5 
10 

12 

9 


1 

o 
T 3 

M 

10 
12 
I 2 
2O 

15 
10 

13 

1 2 







1 






9 

15 
1 1 

15 
*5 
19 
7 
17 
T 5 
i5 




9 

5 
1 1 

i5 
i5 
J 9 
18 

i? 
IS 
15 


2O 

159 

I6 5 
M7 
154 
149 
166 

156 

146 

161 
163 




B 


c 


D 


K 


F 


G . 


H 


T 


K 


Totals 


10 


124 


34 


I 


148 


149 


1,586 





Total of killed and wounded, 489 ; Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 33. 



BATTLE?. K. &M.W. 

First Bull Run, Va 8 

Fair Oaks, Va 14 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Manassas, Va 5 

Chantilly, Va 8 

Fredericksburg, Va 6 



Chancellorsville, Va 6 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Gettysburg, Pa 30 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 24 

Spotsylvania, Va 15 

North Anna, Va 9 

Totopotomoy, Va 6 

Gunboat Service, Miss i 



Present, also, at Bailey s Cross Roads ; Yorktown ; Williamsburg ; White Oak Swamp ; Glendale ; Wapping 
Heights ; Kelly s Ford ; Cold Harbor. 



NOTES. Recruited mostly from the Kennebec lumbermen ; the men were of a large, powerful type, their aver 
age weight in one company being 1 70 pounds. The regiment was organized at Augusta, arriving at Washington 
June 7, 1861. It fought at First Bull Run, and a year later was engaged in another bloody contest on. the same 
field. During 1862 it served in Birney s Brigade of Kearny s Division; it was in that command at Fair Oaks, 
where it made a gallant and successful charge, but lost nearly one-third of the number engaged ; the loss was 8 
killed, 71 wounded, and 3 missing. It participated in all the battles and marches of the Third Corps, becoming 
sadly reduced in number by deaths, wounds, and the sickness incidental to arduous campaigns. When it entered 
the field at Gettysburg, it numbered 14 officers and 196 rifles ; of this number it lost 18 killed, 59 wounded, and 
45 missing. Under command of Colonel Lakeman, it lendered good service in that battle ; on the second day, 
in company with Berdan s Sharpshooters, it made an advance outside the lines which developed the enemy s 
position and elicited timely warning of the attack on Sickles Corps. The tenacity with which the Third Maine 
held that skirmish line at Gettysburg is worthy of note. The regiment did some more hard fighting in the 
Wilderness campaign, during which it fought in Hancock s Second Corps. Lt. Col. Edwin Burt was killed at the 
Wilderness, and Major William C. Morgan at the North Anna. While inline at Cold Harbor, the regiment was 
ordered homo, and the recruits transferred to the Seventeenth Maine. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



12; 



FOURTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
WARD S BRIGADE, BIRNEY S DIVISION, THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. HIRAM G. BKKKY, MAJ. (!KN. (Killed). 



(8) COL. ELIJAH WAI.KKK. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OK WOUNDS. 


DIKI> or DI.XKAMK, ArriiHCNTs, IN PIUMIX, A 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 



4 

12 

3 

14 

4 
5 
4 
5 
3 
3 


Field and Staff 


3 

* 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
2 
I 
2 


I 

5 
10 

27 

9 

24 
1 1 

16 
10 
14 

*9 


4 

5 
1 1 

28 
20 

25 

12 

17 
12 

5 

21 




I 







* 
* * 


i 




3 

12 

3 
4 
4 
15 
M 
5 
3 

1 2 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


4 


156 


I 7 


2 


35 


37 





Total 
Knnillinent 



7 
3 

! 33 
140 

169 
126 

138 
149 

38 
5 
5 

1,440 



Total of killed and wounded, 613. Died of 



BATTLES. K.*M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 33 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 27 

Wilderness, Va 46 



Po River, Va 

Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna, Va 

Gunboat Service, Miss. 



170 killed = ii. 8 per cent. 

Of the 1,002 originally enrolled, 141 were kilk-d ; or, 14.0 per cent, 
disease in Confederate prisons, 40. 

BATTLES. K.&M.NV. 

First Bull Run, Va 21 

Vorktown, Va i 

Williamsburg, Va i 

Fair Oaks, Va 2 

Picket, Va., June, 1 862 2 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Manassas, Va i o 

Chantilly, Va 12 

Present, also, at Oak Grove ; Glendale ; Mine Run; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor. 

Organi/.ed at Rockland, Me., May 8, 1861. Leaving the State on June 2oth, it went into action, a month 
later, at First Bull Run. In September, 1861, a mutiny occurred in the regiment, which resulted in the transfer 
of about 100 men to another command. The men mutinied because they had enlisted for three months, or 
supposed the regiment was a three-months one, and so objected to being held for three years. Similar irregu 
larities on the part of recruiting and mustering-in officers had become a frequent cause for complaint throughout 
the Army. In this case Company H was disbanded, and its place filled, in November by a new company of 
recruits. The regiment entered upon the Peninsular campaign in Birney Brigade ol Kearny s Division, Third 
Corps. It fought in this command, also, during Pope s campaign, its losses at Manassas including Chantilly- 
amounting to 14 killed, 85 wounded, and 15 missing. At Fredericksburg, it lost 22 killed, 66 wounded, and 32 
missing; at Gettysburg, n killed, 59 wounded, and 74 missing. In 1864, the division was transferred to the 
Second Corps. In the battle of the Wilderness the regiment was badly cut up; 32 were killed, 136 wounded, 
and 3 missing. The Fourth Maine lost three Majors killed in action : Major Pitcher was killed at Fredericksburg ; 
Major Whitcomb fell, mortally wounded, at Gettysburg, and Major Grey was killed at the Wilderness. The term 
of service of the regiment expired on the i5th of June, 1864, when it was ordered home for muster-out, and the 
recruits remaining in the field were transferred to the Nineteenth Maine. 



128 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTH MAINE INFAOTBY. 
KUSSELL S BRIGADE, WRIGHT S DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ABNER KNOWLES. (3) COL. HIRAM BURNIIAM, BRIO. GEN. (Killed). (3) COL. BENJAMIN F. HARRIS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, ETC. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


I 

2 



I 
2 
I 
I 

2 

I 
I 


I I 

16 

8 

13 

16 

13 

15 

*7 

1 S 

17 


I 
J 3 

16 

9 
15 
i7 
M 
i? 

17 

16 

18 


2 









I 

8 

9 
9 

7 
6 

21 
12 
12 
II 

4 


3 

8 

9 
9 

7 
6 

21 
12 
12 
I I 

4 


*9 
126 

122 

IJ 5 

122 
107 
129 
112 
132 
II 9 

no 




B 


r 


D . 


K 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


12 


141 


153 


2 


IOO 


IO2 


1,213 





153 killed = 12.6 percent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 519. With the killed are included 18 men, missing in action. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Siege of Yorktown, Va 2 

Williamsburg, Va i 

Garnett s Farm, Va 4 

Seven Days Battle, Va 3 

Antietam, Md i 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1863; 38 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Rappahannock Station 56 

\Vilderness, Va i 

Spotsylvania, Va 37 

Cold Harbor, Va 7 

Petersburg, Va 2 

Picket Duty i 



Present, also, at White Oak Swamp; Malvern Hillj Fredericksburg, 1862; Gettysburg; Fort Stevens. 

NOTES. There was no more brilliant action in the war than the affair at Rappahannock Station, Va., Nov. 7, 
1863. The Sixth Maine was the most prominent in that successful fight, although gallantly assisted by the other 
regiments of the brigade. The enemy, about 2,000 strong, occupied an intrenched position; the Sixth Maine, 
with uncapped muskets, supported by the Fifth Wisconsin, stormed their works, and springing over them were 
engaged in a desperate struggle, some of the fighting being hand to hand ; bayonets were freely used, and in one 
case an officer thrust his sabre through an antagonist. Good fighting was also done at other points of the line, 
the total result being a brilliant victory, with large captures of men and material. But the brunt of the fight fell 
on the Sixth. It lost 38 killed, and 101 wounded, out of the 321 present in action ; and of 21 officers engaged, 
16 were killed or wounded. This was not the first time that the Sixth had leaped the enemy s breastworks 
against the blazing muzzles of a line of rifles. In the successful assault on Marye s Heights, May 3, 1863, the 
flag of the Sixth was the first to wave over the enemy s works. The regiment was then in the famous " Light 
Division " of the Sixth Corps, and did not fire a shot during the charge, but carried the works with the bayonet ; 
and mention is made of one man in the Sixth who bayoneted two adversaries, and then brained a third with the 
butt of a musket. The loss of the regiment in that battle was 23 killed, in wounded, and 35 missing. Major 
Haycock and four captains were among the killed. The regiment was mustered out August 15, 1864, i ts three 
years term of service having expired. 



TllUEE Hl NDRRD FldHTINU ItKUlMENTS. 



SEVENTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
NEIL S BRIGADE, HOWE S DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS H. MAItSIIALL (Died). (2) COL. EDWIN c. MASON, B. *. ; BVT. Bnio. GKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OK \V<>i M>- 


DIED or DINKABE, A<VU>ENTS, IN I KIIMIN, Ac. 


Total 
Kiirollmrnt. 


Oflficcrs. 


Meu. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


T..tal. 


Field and Staff 


2 



2 
I 

3 

2 


I 

3 
1 1 

1 1 
10 
6 

7 
10 

6 
10 
18 


3 

!3 

3 

12 
13 

7 
18 

I 2 

1 
I I 

!9 


I 

* 





I 



I 


I 

19 
27 

23 

19 
12 

35 
! 3 

12 

23 
2 5 


2 

9 

27 

2 3 
19 

I 2 

35 
3 
13 

2 3 
26 


18 
9 1 
75 

45 
149 

7 

I0 5 
in 

90 

9 1 
119 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


15 


"3 


128 


3 


2O(; 


212 


1,165 





128 killed 10.9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 555. Died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included) 19. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Siege of Yorktown, Va . 3 

Lee s Mills, Va 

Antietam, Md 25 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1863) 20 

Gettysburg, Pa i 

Wilderness, Va 36 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va., May loth 2 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 1 2th , . . . 27 

Spotsylvania, Va., May i8th 6 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 

Petersburg, Va i 

Fort Stevens, I ). C 3 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Mechanicsville (May 24th) ; Golding s Farm ; Garnett s Hill ; Savage 
Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; Crampton s Pass ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; Shenandoah 
Valley. 

NOTES. Organized at Augusta, Me., August 21, 1861, from companies recruited in various parts of the State. 
It proceeded immediately to Baltimore, and thence, after a two weeks stay, to Washington. It encamped there 
two weeks, and then, on Nov. 7, 1861, marched to Lewinsville, Va., where it performed outpost duty until the 
spring of 1862. It joined in the advance on Manassas, and then embarked for the Peninsula. It was then in 
Davidson s (3d) Brigade, Wm F. Smith s Division, Fourth Corps ; this division was transferred in May to the 
newly-formed Sixth Corps. The loss by disease and sickness was so great that the regiment took only 181 men 
into action at Antietam ; it was commanded in that battle by Major Hyde, and lost there 1 2 killed, 63 wounded, 
and 20 missing, over half of those engaged. Becoming much reduced in numbers, it was ordered home to 
Maine, in October, 1862, to recruit. Five companies B, C, I), I and K. under command of Lt.-Col. Selden 
Conner, rejoined the corps in January, 1863, and were engaged at Fredericksburg, May 3, 1863, with a loss of 12 
killed, 49 wounded, and 31 missing. In May, 1864, the regiment then in Getty s Division entered the 
Wilderness campaign, where it took part in the bloody contest which was waged by the Sixth Corps. From May 
5th to May i8th, it lost 310 in killed and wounded. Its last battle occurred at Fort Stevens, within the city 
limits of Washington, where it assisted in repulsing Early s attack. Major Jones was killed in this action. Its 
term of service expired August 21, 1864, while in the Shenandoah, and the recruits were transferred to the First 
Maine Veteran Infantry. 
9 



130 



BEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



EIGHTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
WHITE S BRIGADE AMES S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. LEE STRICKLAND. 

(2) COL. JOHN D. KUST ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. HENRY BOYNTON ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 

(4) COL. WILLIAM M. McARTIIUR ; BVT. BKIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 

I 

* 





2 
2 


9 

J 3 

8 

10 

IS 

JO 

16 

!9 

M 

M 


IO 
!3 

9 
10 

J 5 

IO 

16 

21 

16 

M 





I 
I 
I 



* 

I 






I 

18 
18 

21 

18 

3 2 
33 
36 
26 

20 

2O 


I 

18 
9 

22 

J 9 
3 2 
33 
36 

27 

20 
2O 


2 3 

54 
162 

5 1 
146 

149 
!57 

*73 

149 
166 
56 




B 


r . 


D . 


E . 


F 


G 


H. 


T , 


K 




6 


128 


J34 


4 


243 


247 


1,586 





Total loss in killed and wounded, 489. Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 35. 



BATTLES. 



K. &M.W. 



BATTLES. 



Jacksonville, Fla 2 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 14 

Gill s Farm, Va 4 

Ware Bottom Church, Va 19 

Cold Harbor, Va. (assault) 22 

Cold Harbor, Va. (trenches) 4 

Picket, July 4, 1 862 i 



Petersburg, Va. (assault) 

Petersburg, Va. (trenches) 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 

Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. . 
Spring Hill, Va., Dec. 10, 1864. 

Fall of Petersburg, Va , 

Rice s Station, Va 



K. & M.W. 
... 2 7 
... 21 
... 2 

7 

5 
4 

. . . 2 



Present, also, at Fort Pulaski ; Arrowfield Church ; Chester Station ; Petersburg Mine ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The regiment left the State Sept. 10, 1 86 1, and in the following month sailed from Annapolis with Gen 
eral T. W. Sherman s expedition to Port Royal, S. C. Landing at Hilton Head, Nov. 8, 1861, it remained on 
duty in that Military Department over two years. During its stay there it took part in the reduction of Fort 
Pulaski, the occupation of Jacksonville, Fla., and was present at the bombardment of Fort Sumter. Most of the 
time, however, was passed in garrison duty at Hilton Head, and Beaufort, S. C. In the meantime, the regiment 
received about 300 recruits and 200 conscripts, which kept its ranks up to the maximum, although the loss by 
disease had been very large. In March, 1864, the proposal for reenlistment was accepted by 16 officers and 330 
men, who returned to Maine on the thirty days furlough granted in such cases. On April 26, 1864, tne regiment 
joined Butler s Army, then on the James River, Va., and entered upon the campaign against Richmond, having 
been assigned to White s (3d) Brigade, Ames s (3d) Division, Tenth Corps. It was actively engaged at Drewry s 
Bluff, where it lost 3 killed, 64 wounded, and 29 missing. Colonel Boynton, who was in command, was severely 
wounded, and Major Me Arthur succeeded to the command. Four days later it was engaged at Ware Bottom 
Church, with a loss of 83, out of the 190 present in action. At Cold Harbor, the regiment was in Stedman s 
Brigade, 2d Division, Eighteenth Corps, and sustained there a loss of 12 killed, 87 wounded, and 2 missing. In 
December, it was assigned to Fairchild s (4th) Brigade, Foster s (ist) Division, Twenty- fourth Corps, in which 
command it fought in the final battles of the war. 



THREE HUNDRED FRUITING REGIMENTS. 



131 



NINTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
DRAKE S BRIGADE- AMES S DIVISION -- TENTH CORPS. 



(I) COL. HORATIO BISBEE. 

(4) COL ZINA II. ROBINSON. 



(2) COL. MsmVOHTH KICH. (3) Coi.. SAI1IXK RMRKY. 

(5) COL. UKORGE F. GRANUKK ; HVT. Hum. (iEN. 



CUM PA Nl EH. 


KILLED AND DIED >r WOUNDS. 


DIED or DINKAUC, ACCIDENTS, IN I HINO.V, Ac. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Mon. Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 

I 



I 
I 

i 
i 

3 
i 




5 

I 2 
IO 

18 

20 

19 
2O 

16 
20 

22 




16 
M 

IO 

19 

21 
2O 

21 

16 

23 
23 


i 

i 



i 




* 

22 
2O 

2 3 

33 

25 
27 

16 

9 

24 

27 


i 

22 
2O 

24 

33 
26 

27 
16 

19 

24 

*y *1 

- i 

239 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


172 


182 


3 


236 





Total 

KnrolliiH-iii. 



21 

95 
191 

180 

9S 
216 

83 

93 

i 

197 

2I.S 



.973 



Total of killed and wounded, 644. 



BATTLM. K. &M.W. 

Fernandina, Fla i 

Morris Island, S. C., July 10, 1863 3 

Fort Wagner, S. C., July 1 1, 1863 5 

Fort Wagner, S. C., July 18, 1863 24 

Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C i o 

Port Walthal, Va i 

Arrowfield Church, Va i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 10 

Ware Bottom Church, Va 1 6 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Cold Harbor, Va., 23 

Petersburg, Va., June 30, 1864 20 

Petersburg Mine, Va 1 1 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 19 

Deep Bottom, Va 9 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 1 6 

Darbytown Road, Va 10 

Guard duty, April 10, 1862 i 

Picket, Va., May 23, 1 864 2 



Present, also, at Bermuda Hundred ; Wilmington, N. C. 

NOTES. The Ninth left the State Sept. 24, 1861, and in the next month sailed from Fort Monroe for Hilton 
Head, S. C. The year 1862 was spent in garrison duty at Fernandina, Fla. ; in January, 1863, it returned to Hilton 
Head, where it remained on picket duty until June ; then it joined the forces operating in Charleston Harbor. 
Led by Colonel Emery, it participated in the assault of Strong s Brigade on Fort Wagner, and in the opening 
fight on Morris Island captured two of the enemy s flags. During the Siege of Fort Wagner its casualties, in 
the assaults and in the trenches, amounted to 189 in killed, wounded, and missing. In October, 1863, the regi 
ment moved to Black Island, S. C. While there, 416 of the original members reenlisted and received their 
furlough. On April 18, 1864, the Ninth proceeded to Gloucester Point, Va., where it was assigned to Ames s 
Division, Tenth Corps. Ascending the James River, the troops landed at Bermuda Hundred, and advanced 
immediately on the enemy s lines. Severe fighting followed, and in the battle of May 2Oth, the casualties in the 
regiment were 9 killed, 39 wounded, and 4 missing. At Cold Harbor, having been transferred to the Eighteenth 
Corps, it joined in the assault with a loss of 12 killed, 55 wounded, and 5 missing. While in the trenches before 
Petersburg, on June 3oth, 1864, in an affair on the picket line, there was a loss of 7 killed, 34 wounded, and 5 
missing, out of 102 who went into the fight. The loss at Deep Bottom was 5 killed, 21 wounded, and 29 missing. 
Only 201 were present for duty when ordered to Chaffin s Farm ; in that battle, Lieutenant-Colonel Gray fell at 
the head of the regiment. 



132 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTEENTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
PAUL S BRIGADE ROBINSON S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. ASA W. WILDES. 



(2) COL. CHARLES W. TILDEN ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 

2 



2 
I 

I 



I 


I 

16 

12 
28 

17 

18 

12 

2 5 
I I 

12 
2O 


2 

17 

14 

28 

*9 
19 

12 

2 5 
12 

12 
21 




I 
I 











16 

20 

3 1 

25 
29 

25 

27 

29 

35 

20 




17 
2O 

3 1 
26 

2 9 

2 S 
2 7 
29 

35 
20 


13 

183 
1 80 

2O2 
177 
205 
169 
211 
194 

1 88 
185 




B 


c 


D. 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


172 


181 


2 


257 


2 59 


1,907 





Total of killed and wounded, 759 ; Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 76. 



K. &M.W. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 14 

Weldon Railroad, Va 10 

Hatcher s Run, Va 1 1 

Gravelly Run, Va 2 

Five Forks, Va 2 

Skirmish Line, Va., June 21, 1864 i 

Skirmish Line, Va., Oct. 8, 1864 i 



BATTLES. 

Fredericksburg, Va *j6 

Gettysburg, Pa 27 

Wilderness, Va 3 

Spotsylvania, Va 25 

North Anna, Va 2 

f Bethesda Church, Va 3 

1 Cold Harbor, Va 3 

Picket, Va., June 6, 1864 i 

Present, also, at Chancellorsville ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized August 14, 1862, with Captain C. W. Tilden, of the Second Maine, as its Colonel, who com 
manded it during its entire service. Arriving at Washington on August 21, 1862, it was ordered immediately on 
active duty in Maryland. The fatigue and exposure of a campaign without the customary preparatory service 
cost the regiment many lives, and sent large numbers to the hospital. It was assigned to Root s (ist) Brigade, 
Gibbon s (2d) Division, First Corps, and marched to Fredericksburg with that command. This was its first bat 
tle ; but its ranks had become so reduced by the sickness, common among raw troops in active service, that only 
427 were present in that action, of which it lost 27 killed, 170 wounded, and 34 missing; of the latter none 
returned. Another severe loss was sustained at Gettysburg. Of the 248 officers and men engaged in that bat 
tle, the casualties amounted to 9 killed, 59 wounded, and 164 captured. At the close of the fight, 2 officers and 
15 men alone remained; Colonel Tilden was taken prisoner with his men. Many of the wounded died and 
nearly all the amputations proved fatal. In March, 1864, the division was transferred to the Fifth Corps; in 
June the regiment was transferred to Crawford s (3d) Division, and to Baxter s (2d) Brigade of the same corps. 
It fought in all the battles of the Fifth Corps in 1864-5, its hardest fighting occurring at Spotsylvania, where 
Major Leavitt fell, mortally wounded. Another severe fight took place at Hatcher s Run (Dabney s Mills) Feb 
ruary 6, 1865, in which the regiment lost 3 killed, 60 wounded, and n missing. 



* Regimental history says 90 ;- killed 50, mortally wounded 34. 



TllKKK HUN1)KKI> FuiII l lNO ItKUIMKNTS. 



laa 



SEVENTEENTH MAINE INFANTRY. 

PE TKOBRIAND S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS A. ROBERTS. (2) COL. GEORGE W. WEST ; BVT. Bm.i. OKX. (8) COL. CHARLES P. MATTOCKS ; Bvr. BRIO. OKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED op WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DIXKANK, ACCIDENTS, IN PKIHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field ind Staff. . 



2 

I 




I 



3 
3 

2 




22 

1 8 

J 9 
20 

18 
16 

21 

23 
2 I 

7 




24 
19 

9 

20 

19 

16 

24 
26 

21 
19 


I 



I 



I 
I 







12 
4 
23 
9 

18 

12 
M 
19 

9 

19 


I 
12 

5 

23 
IO 

19 

I 2 
4 

9 
9 
9 


1 9 

45 

32 

5<> 
129 

128 
126 

I2 5 

35 
1 29 

47 




B 


c . 


D 


E 


F . 


G. 


H. 


I 


K 


Tot-ils . 


12 


1 95 


20 7 


4 


159 


,63 


I >37 1 





207 killed 15 per cent. 
Total loss in killed and wounded, 759 ; Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 31. 



BATTIJM. K. & M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 14 

Gettysburg, Pa 40 

Wapping Heights, Va i 

Mine Run, Va 12 

Wilderness, Va 54 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 6 

North Anna, Va 7 

Cold Harbor, Va i 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 22 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 20 

Jerusalem Road, Va 3 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March, 25, 1865 2 

Sailor s Creek, Va 6 

Farmville, Va 2 

Picket, Va., Oct. 2, 1864 i 



Picket, Va., Oct. 1 7, 1864 i 

Present, also, at Auburn, Va. ; Po River; Totopotomoy ; Strawberry Plains; Deep Bottom; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited in the counties of York, Cumberland, Oxford, and Androscoggin. It arrived at Washington 
August 23, 1862, where it was engaged in drill and garrison duty until October, when it crossed into Virginia and 
joined Berry s (3d) Brigade, Birney s (ist) Division, Third Corps. The regiment made a creditable record at 
Fredericksburg, and at Chancellorville it sustained a loss of 10 killed, 65 wounded and 38 missing. At Gettys 
burg, Lt.-Col. C. B. Merrill commanding, it was engaged in Sickles s fight on the second day, losing 18 killed, 
112 wounded, and 3 missing. In March, 1864, Birney s Division was transferred to the Second Corps, the regi 
ment being placed in General Alex. Hays s Brigade of that division Second Brigade, Third Division, Second 
Army Corps. Led by Colonel West, it crossed the Rapidan with 507 men, and fought under Grant at the battle 
of the Wilderness, where its casualties amounted to 22 killed, 155 wounded, and 15 missing; total, 192. In 
June it was transferred to the First Brigade, with which it took part in the storming of Petersburg, June 16-18, 
1864. Its losses in those bloody and disastrous assaults were 13 killed, 66 wounded, and 5 missing. In June, 
1 29 men were received by a transfer from the Third Maine, the term of that regiment having expired ; even 
with this accession, the ranks showed but little over 200 muskets in line. The Seventeenth sustained the heaviest 
loss in battle of any infantry regiment from Maine. It was mustered out on June 4, 1865. 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



NINETEENTH MAINE INFANTRY. 
HARROW S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) Coi. FREDERICK D. SEWELL. (3) COL. FRANCIS E. HEATH ; BVT. Bitio. GEM. (3) COL. SELDEN CONNER ; Bum. GEN. 
(4) COL. JAMES W. WELCH. (5) COL. ISAAC W. STARBIRD ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, TN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 



2 






7 

2 5 
M 

2 I 

J 9 
1 1 

1 6 

18 

2 3 

2 5 


* 

>7 
26 

M 

21 

T 9 
1 1 

16 

18 

2 5 

2 5 


* 


I 






* 


I 


* 

I 

2 3 

T 5 
16 

16 

*7 

18 

3 
15 
3 1 
T 7 


I 

2 3 

16 
16 
16 

J 7 
18 

13 
T 5 

3 1 
18 


18 
140 

49 
149 

139 

128 

139 

T 35 
149 

5 1 
144 




B 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


3 


189 


192 


2 


182 


184 


1,441 





192 killed = 13.3 per cent. 
Total loss in killed and wounded, 693 ; Died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 47. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Gettysburg, Pa 68 

Haymarket, Va i 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Mine Run, Va i 

Morton s Ford, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 37 

Spotsylvania, Va 17 

North Anna, Va 8 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 9 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 29 

Deep Bottom, Va 2 

Ream s Station, Va 7 

Boydton Road, Va 2 

Hatcher s Run, Va 4 

Picket, Va., Oct., 1864 2 



Present, also, at Charlestown, W. Va. ; First Fredericksburg ; Second Fredericksburg ; Po River ; Strawberry 
Plains ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. Recruited in the counties of Knox, Waldo, Kennebec, and Sagadahoc. The field officers had already 
served with honorable distinction in other Maine regiments. It arrived at Washington August 29, 1862, having 
been recruited, organized, and equipped within four weeks, a characteristic common to most of the regiments 
raised under the second call for troops. It was assigned to Gorman s (rst) Brigade, Howard s (2d) Division, 
Second Corps, with which command it was under fire for the first time, in a reconnoissance at Charlestown, W. Va., 
October 16, 1862 ; and, again, in the battle of Fredericksburg, where several of the men were wounded. Under 
command of Colonel Heath, the regiment was conspicuously engaged at Gettysburg, where it faced a./eu cT enfer 
that cost it 29 killed, 166 wounded, and 4 missing ; a total of 199, out of 440 present, all told. During Grant s 
opening campaign the brigade was commanded by General Alex. S. Webb, of Gettysburg fame. The regiment 
entered this campaign with 22 officers and 468 men; losing at the Wilderness 22 killed, 130 wounded, and 
6 missing. The recruits left in the field by the Fourth Maine were transferred to the Nineteenth in June, 1864 ; 
there were 277 of them, nominally, but only 57 of them actually joined. 



THUEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



135 



TWENTIETH MAINE INFANTRY. 
VINCENT S BRIGADE --GRIFFIN S DIVISION --FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL, ADF.LBERT AMKS. 13H. $., B. *.; BVT. MA.IOII GEN. U. 8. A. 
(3) COL. JOallUA L CHAMBERLAIN ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. U. 8. V. 



(8) COL. CHARLES D OILMORB. 

(4) COL. ELLIS SPEAR ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. U. 8. V. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIKD OK DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, Ac. 


Total 

Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


M. ii 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




2 
I 
1 

I 

I 

2 

1 


i i 

5 
7 

16 

3 

9 
4 

I 2 

9 

1 2 




3 
16 

18 

7 
3 

20 

16 

I 2 

9 
3 






* 
* 

I 







9 
i i 

10 

5 

18 

5 
8 

20 

5 
4 


9 
I I 

IO 

5 
18 

1 6 
8 
20 

5 
14 


9 
164 

5 
169 

170 

140 

*74 

47 
170 

57 
161 

1,62 i 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


13S 


47 


I 


45 


146 





Total of killed and wounded, 528. Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 15. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Fredericksburg, Va 8 

Aldie, Va., June 21, 1863 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 41 

Sharpsburg Pike, Md. (1863) i 

Rappahannock Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 21 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 5 



BATTLES. K.&MW. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 14 

Jerusalem Road, Va 4 

Peebles Farm, Va 13 

Boydton Road, Va 2 

Dabney s Mills, Va 2 

Gravelly Run, Va 3 

Five Forks, Va 13 

Appomattox, Va i 

Place Unknown 2 



Present, also, at Antietam ; Chancellorsvillc ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; Weldon Railroad ; Hatcher s Run. 

NOTES. The Twentieth Maine could not well be other than a good regiment, under the tuition and lead of such 
colonels as Ames and Chamberlain. Ames, who was destined to renown as the central figure at Fort Fisher, left the 
regiment in a few months, but not until he had lead the men in battle, and given them the benefit of his military 
training and experience. Colonel Chamberlain, a professor at Bowdoin, left his chair in spite of strenuous re 
monstrance and opposition, and tendered his services to the State. He, also, made a brilliant reputation as a 
colonel and a general, and is quoted as having said that " he never left one of his wounded in the hands of the 
enemy, nor one of his dead without fitting burial." Chamberlain anil his men did much to save the day at 
Gettysburg, by their prompt and plucky action at Little Round Top. Holding the extreme left on that field, they 
repulsed a well-nigh successful attempt of the enemy to turn that flank, an episode which forms a conspicuous 
feature in the history of that battle. Their loss at Gettysburg was 29 killed and 96 wounded. General Bartlett 
commanded the brigade 3d Brigade, ist Division, 5th A. C. at the Wilderness, where the regiment was 
hotly engaged, May 5th and 6th, with a loss of 13 killed, 82 wounded, and 16 missing. About 200 recruits were 
received in 1864; in June, 1864, there were only about 275 muskets for duty. It was engaged at Five Forks, 
with a heavy percentage of loss, and was skirmishing under fire when the surrender took place at Appomattox. 
After the war closed, the rolls were swelled by accessions from disbanded regiments. 



136 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRTY-FIRST MAINE INFANTRY. 
GRIFFIN S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS RIGHT, W&. P., &. a. 



(2) COL. DANIEL WHITE ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


I 

2 
2 

3 
I 

I 

3 

i 



3 

i 




I 
2O 
16 
12 

16 

19 

M 

20 

I? 

IO 

13 

4 
3 


2 
22 

18 

J 5 
17 

20 

17 
21 

I? 
13 

14 

4 
3 




* 








* 


I 

I? 

17 
*4 
14 
2 5 
M 
19 
15 
14 
14 

7 
5 


I 

I? 
17 

14 
14 
2 5 
14 
19 
15 
14 
H 
7 
5 


18 
142 

J5 1 

i35 
128 

43 

J 37 
I2 5 

139 

126 

128 
1 08 

^5 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K . 


L 


M 


Totals . 


18 


165 


183 





176 


176 


i,595 





Original enrollment, 939; killed, 158 ; percentage, 16.8. 
Total of killed and wounded, 628 ; Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 34. 



BATTLES. K. & M.w. 

Wilderness, Va 12 

Spotsylvania, Va 29 

North Anna, Va 2 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 

Bethesda Church, June 3, 1864 29 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 6 

Picket, Va., June, 1 864 3 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Petersburg, Va. (June 1 7, 1864) 19 

Petersburg Mine, Va 23 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 24 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 14 

Picket, Va., Dec. i, 1864 i 

Fall of Petersburg 18 



Present, also, at Boydton Road ; Weldon Railroad ; Fort Stedman. 

NOTES. Organized at Augusta, Me., in March and April, 1864. Leaving the State, April i8th, it proceeded to 
Alexandria, Va., where it was assigned to the 2nd Brigade (General S. G. Griffin s), 2d Division (General R. B. 
Potter s), Ninth Corps. In less than a month after leaving home the regiment went into action at the Wilder 
ness, and on May i2th was hotly engaged at Spotsylvania, where it lost n killed, 94 wounded, and i missing. 
In the fighting at Bethesda Church, June 3d, it lost 15 killed and 39 wounded, and behaved with such gallantry 
that General Griffin complimented it in orders. Under command of Colonel White, the regiment rendered 
efficient service in the assault on Petersburg, June 1 7th, and at the Mine explosion it was among the first to enter 
the enemy s works. Its losses at the Mine were 9 killed, 26 wounded, and 51 captured or missing. In October 
there were only about 60 men left on duty ; then two new companies joined the regiment, which were designated 
as L and M, and in December the regiment received an accession by the consolidation with it of the Thirty- 
second Maine ; 485 men were thus transferred on the rolls, of whom only 1 8 1 were present for duty. In less 
than one year s time the Thirty-first Maine lost 674 men, killed or wounded in action, three-fourths of this loss 
occurring in May, June and July, 1864. After the war had ended the regiment was transferred to the Nineteenth 
Corps, and stationed at Savannah, Ga., until August 2oth, 1865, when it was mustered out. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



SECOND NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
BURLING S BRIGADE - - HUMPHREYS^ DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) Coi.. OILMAN MARSTON; Buio. GlH. 



(2) Coi.. EDWAKD L. BAILEY. 



(3) COL. JOAB N. PATTERSON ; BVT. BRIO. OB*. 



COMPANIES. 


KM i.i i> AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIKU or DISEASE, ACCIDENT*. IN I KIMON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( XHcera. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 





4 
i 



3 

2 

2 



2 
\ 


I 

9 

12 

8 

7 
1 1 

9 

I 2 
1 

8 
9 


I 

9 
1 6 

9 

7 
M 
1 1 

14 

7 
10 

10 


I 



2 




* 

1 
1 
I 






>4 
7 

5 
8 

8 
1 1 
10 

I 2 

7 
9 


I 
M 
9 

5 
8 

8 
1 1 
1 1 

13 
8 

9 


3 

102 
IOI 
IOO 
IOO 
9 8 
9 6 
IO2 
IOO 
IOI 
IOO 




B 


c 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


5 




93 
70 


1 08 
70 


6 




9 1 

75 


97 

75 


1,013 
1,639 






5 


163 


178 


6 


1 66 


172 


2,652 





Of the 1,013 originally enrolled, 108 were killed 10.6 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 658. 



BATTLES. K.&M.NV. 

First Bull Run, Va 14 

Williamsburg, Va 23 

Oak Grove, Va 9 

Glendale, Va i 

Manassas, Va 37 

Fredericksburg, Va 3 



BATTLM. K. & M W 

Gettysburg, Pa 48 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va 22 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 10 

Fair Oaks, Va. ( 1 864) 2 

Scouting, Va. (April 2, 1862) i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Fair Oaks (1862); White Oak Swamp; Malvern Hill; Chantilly; Wapping 
Heights ; Bermuda Hundred ; Fall of Richmond. 

NOTES. Arriving at Washington June 23, 1861, it encamped there a few weeks, and then marched away to First 
Bull Run, with Burnside s Brigade of Hunter s Division. It passed the succeeding fall and winter in Maryland, on the 
lower Potomac. In the spring of 1862 it took the field, then in Grover s (ist) Brigade, Hooker s (zd) Division, 
Third Corps. Hooker withstood the brunt of the attack at the battle of Williamsburg, in which the Second lost 
1 6 killed, 68 wounded, and 19 missing. Upon its return from the Peninsula, Grover s Brigade was hotly engaged 
at Manassas, where the regiment, fighting on that familiar field, lost 16 killed, 87 wounded, and 30 missing, out of 
332 present in action. The Second was ordered home on February 26, 1863, and was absent a couple of months, 
rejoining the Army in June, while on its way to Gettysburg, at which time it was assigned to the Jersey Brigade of 
Humphreys s (2d) Division. It fought in the Peach Orchard, at Gettysburg, and while there, just before the 
opening of the fight on the second day, the roll was called. Only eight men were absent from their places, while 
24 officers and 330 men answered to their names. Of that number, the regiment lost 20 killed, 137 wounded, 
and 36 missing ; of the 24 officers, 7 were killed and 14 wounded. One wounded captain, shot in the forehead, 
wandered into the enemy s lines, where he died and was buried by some brother masons. In August, the regiment 
was assigned to guard duty at Point Lookout, Md., where it remained until May, 1864, when it took the field as 
a part of Weitzel s (2d) Division, Eighteenth Corps. 



138 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
HAWLEY S BRIGADE TERRY S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ENOCH Q. FELLOWS. 



(2) COL. JOHN II. JACKSON. 



(3) COL. JOHN BEDELL; BVT. BRIO. GEX. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 

Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2. 

I 
2 
I 

3 

2 
I 


* 

2O 
18 
l6 

2 5 
T 9 

J 7 
16 

21 

16 

18 


2 
2O 

18 
T 7 
2 5 

21 
I? 

X 7 
24 

18 
9 


I 




, 


* 


I 






15 

16 

16 
M 

12 

15 
24 

14 

14 
12 


I 
15 

16 
16 

M 

12 

IS 

24 

M 

15 
12 


J 7 
169 

172 
171 
1 68 
166 

i?4 

1 68 

171 

173 

176 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F . 


G. 


H 


T . 


K 


Totals . 


12 


1 86 


198 


2 


J5 2 


54 


i,7 2 5 





198 killed = 11.4 per cent. 

Of the 1,028 originally enrolled, 132 were killed, and 88 died of disease. Total killed and wounded, 685 ; Died in Con 
federate prisons (previously included), 31. 



BATTLES. 

Secessionville, S. C 

Pinckney Island, S. C 

Morris Island, S. C 

Fort Wagner, S. C. (assault) 

Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C 

Chester Station, Va 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 



K. &M.W. 
. 27 

5 

7 

12 

5 
i 

66 



BATTLES. 

Ware Bottom Church, Va 

Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864. 
Deep Bottom, Va. 



K.&M.W 

3 
... 16 

28 



New Market Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 5 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 i 

Charles City Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 8 

Fort Fisher, N. C 5 

Sugar Loaf Hill, N. C i 



Present, also, at Pocotaligo ; St. John s River ; Pilatka. 

NOTES. Organized at Concord in August, 1 86 1 , and left the State on Sept. 3d. After a short stay, successively, 
at Long Island, Washington, Annapolis, and Fort Monroe, it arrived November 4th at Port Royal, S. C. Re 
maining at Hilton Head and its vicinity, the regiment was not under fire until the affair at Secessionville, June 
1 6, 1862, where, under command of Colonel Jackson, it established a reputation for gallantry and efficiency. It 
took 623 officers and men into that action, sustaining a loss of 9 killed, 93 wounded, and 2 missing; total 104. 
In 1863 it participated in the operations in Charleston Harbor, and in April, 1864, sailed from Florida to join the 
Army of the James in Virginia. On the 6th of May, 1864, it landed at Bermuda Hundred with about 800 men, 
Lt.-Col. Josiah J. Plimpton in command. It was engaged at Drewry s Bluff, May i4th, a memorable day in the 
history of the Third New Hampshire. In that battle it made a brilliant and successful charge, but with a loss of 
over 200 men, the loss occurring in less than twenty minutes time. In July it was armed with Spencer rifles, 
a breech-loader of rapid and effective fire. At Deep Bottom the regiment lost half its number (12 killed, 71 
wounded, and 9 missing), Colonel Plimpton falling, with a bullet through his heart, while leading a charge. The 
regiment was ordered home a few days later ; the recruits and reenlisted men remaining in the field preserved 
the organization. The Third fought at Fort Fisher then in Abbott s Brigade and on July 2oth, 1865, was 
mustered out of service. 



THKKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



FIFTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
CROSS S BRIGADE CALDWELL S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWARD E. CROSS ; B. *. (Killed). 



(2) COL. CHARLES E. HAPOOOD. 



(3) COL. WEI.COMK A. CRAFTS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLRD AND DIED or WOITNDH. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACTIDKNTX, IN I KIHON, Ac. 


Total 

Kiir. Hint-lit. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 
2 
I 
I 

3 
i 

3 

2 

3 


I 

16 

10 

9 

10 

20 

*4 
18 

7 
5 
17 


3 

18 

1 1 

20 

13 

21 

M 

21 

! 9 

15 
20 




I 






I 






5 
3 

13 

8 

1 1 

9 
6 

9 
3 
1 9 




6 

3 

3 

8 

1 1 

10 

6 

9 
13 
9 


3 
101 

87 

101 

85 

101 

9> 

IOI 

95 

IOI 
IOO 


fomtvinv A . 


B 


c 






F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


18 




!57 
1 20 


75 

1 20 


2 




1 06 
7 


1 08 

70 


976 
1,520 




Totals . 


18 


277 


295 


2 


176 


178 


2,496 





Of the original enrollment, 175 were killed 17.9 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 1,051 ; died in Confed 



erate prisons (previously included), 8. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fair Oaks, Va 33 

Allen s Farm, Va 8 

Glendale, Va 8 

Malvern Hill, Va 2 

Antietam, Md 13 

Fredericksburg, Va 51 

Chancellorsville, Va 5 

Gettysburg, Pa 34 

Picket, Va., June 10, 1862 i 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 69 

Petersburg, Va., Assault of June 1 6th 15 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 14 

Jerusalem Road, Va 4 

Strawberry Plains, Va 2 

Deep Bottom, Va 5 

Reams Station, Va 5 

Sailor s Creek, Va 6 

Farmville, Va 20 



Present, also, at Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Totopotomoy ; Sutherland Station ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Sustained the greatest loss in battle of any infantry or cavalry regiment, in the whole Union Army. 
Known to the corps and division commanders as a reliable regiment, it was the more often called upon to face the 
enemy s fire, or assigned to the post of danger. The rolls were encumbered in 1864 with the names of conscripts and 
mercenaries ; 420 of them deserted, most of them before joining the command. The regiment was always well 
handled. Colonel Cross was an experienced officer who sustained an excellent reputation in the corps ; he fell at 
Gettysburg while in command of the brigade, having remarked to Hancock as he entered the field, that it would 
be his last fight. Colonel Crafts, formerly a sergeant in the Second, passed through all the gradations of rank to the 
colonelcy. The greatest loss, numerically, occurred at Cold Harbor, where the regiment, under Colonel Hapgood, 
entered the enemy s works, but for a lack of support, was forced to relinquish its position. Hapgood took 577 men 
into that action, of whom 202 were killed or wounded. At Fredericksburg, under Cross, the regiment lost 20 killed, 
154 wounded, and 19 missing ; total, 193, out of 303 present. At Gettysburg, Hapgood commanding, it lost 27 
killed, and 53 wounded, out of the 12 officers and 165 men engaged. The regiment served throughout the 
war in the First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps. 



140 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
GRIFFIN S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. NELSON CONVERSE. 



(2) COL. SIMON G. GRIFFIN ; BVT. MAJ. GEN. 



(3) COL. PHINEAS BIXBY. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

t 


I 

I 
I 
I 

2 



2 

I 




8 

J 3 

7 

13 

ii 

ii 

7 
J 9 
7 
iS 


I 

8 

J 3 

8 

M 

12 
12 

9 
19 

9 
16 


I 

I 




I 







22 

J 9 
ii 

12 

*9 

12 

18 

J 5 
J 9 
13 


I 
22 
20 
II 
12 

J 9 
12 

18 
16 

r 9 
T 3 


13 

1 08 

IOI 
IOI 
IOI 

IO2 

95 
99 
1 08 

IOI 
IOI 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 




Totals 


IO 

* 


in 
66 


121 

66 


3 




160 
68 


163 
68 


1,030 

1,544 






Ap p PTe2 r ate . 


10 


177 


187 


3 


228 


231 


2 >574 





Of the original enrollment, 121 were killed = 11.7 per cent. Loss in killed and wouded, 679. 



BATTLES. 



K. &M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M.W. 



Camden, N. C i 

Manassas,Va 67 

Chantilly, Va i 

South Mountain, Md i 

Antietam, Md 7 

Fredericksburg, Va 15 

Wilderness, Va 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 8 



North Anna, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 7 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 

Petersburg, Va 20 

Mine Explosion, Va 20 

Weldon Railroad, Va i 

Peebles Farm, Va 1 6 

Fall of Petersburg 4 



Present, also, at Siege of Vicksburg ; Jackson, Miss. ; Totopotomoy ; Hatcher s Run. 

NOTES. Organized at Keene, N. H., leaving the State Dec. 25, 1861. It sailed from Annapolis, Jan. 7, 
1862, with the Burnside expedition, disembarking at Hatteras Island, where it went into a camp of instruction. 
After some active service with Reno s Brigade in North Carolina, it returned to Virginia with the Ninth Corps, in 
August, 1862. It had been assigned in the meantime to Nagle s (ist) Brigade, Reno s (2d) Division, in which 
command it fought at Manassas, where it lost 30 killed, 1 1 7 wounded, and 70 missing, out of 450 engaged ; the 
missing ones were killed or wounded men who fell into the enemy s hands. In March, 1863, the Ninth Corps 
was transferred to the West, where the regiment spent two pleasant months on post duty in Kentucky. It then 
went to Mississippi where it participated in the siege operations about Vicksburg and Jackson ; thence it returned 
to Kentucky, and in the spring of 1864 rejoined the army of the Potomac in Virginia. While in Kentucky 
December, 1863 two hundred and eighty-eight of the men reenlisted, and were furloughed, leaving the 
recruits in camp. The regiment took the field with Grant, in May, 1864, as a part of General S. G. Griffin s 
( 2 d) Brigade, Potter s ( 2 d) Division. Lt.-Col. Henry H. Pearson was killed at the North Anna. In the siege 
of Petersburg, the regiment occupied an exposed position in the trenches, losing men daily ; its losses there, 
from June 2 oth to August 2 oth, 1864, amounted to 18 killed and 108 wounded; being under fire constantly, the 
nervous strain and fatigue was terrible. 



THKKE HUNDKED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



141 



SEVENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
HAWLEY S BRIGADE TERRY S DIVISION -- TENTH CORPS. 



(1) Cot.. HALDINANI) S. PUTNAM, 



. (Killed). 



(2)Coi.. JOSEPH ( . AHHOTT; HVT.BIIHI.OEH. 



1 "MI-AM t.- 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIKD or DIHEAPK, ACCIDENT*, IN PIIIMON, &<. 


ToUl 
Enrollment. 


O (fleers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( Xllcers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



2 

3 

i 

2 



I 
2 
I 

I 




22 

9 
10 

18 

*9 
16 

16 

20 
18 

1 1 


2 
22 
21 

"3 

*9 

21 

16 
7 

22 

19 

12 


I 














26 
22 

30 
20 

1 8 

23 

3 2 

2 3 

16 

3i 


I 
26 
22 

3 
20 

18 

2 3 
3 2 
23 
16 

,3 


16 
73 
75 
47 
172 

169 
171 
.76 

75 
1 68 

176 




B 


c 


1) 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


169 


184 


I 


241 


242 


1,718 





184 killed 10.7 per cent. 



Of the 1,024 originally enrolled, 116 were killed 11.3 per cent. 
Confederate prisons (previously included), 56. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fort Wagner, S. C. (assault) 77 

Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C 4 

Olustee, Fla 51 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 4 

Ware Bottom Church, Va 4 

Bermuda Hundred, Va i 

Petersburg, Va., June 1 6, 1 864 1 1 

Picket, Va., June 18, 1864 2 



Total of killed and wounded, 668. Died in 



BATTLK8. K.&M.W. 

Deep Bottom, Va 5 

New Market Heights, Va 2 

Laurel Hill, Va., Oct. 7, 1 864 9 

Darbytown Road, Va 2 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 6 

Fort Fisher, N. C 4 

Picket, Va., Aug. 25, 1864 i 

Picket, Va., Sept. 13, 1864 i 



Present, also, at Morris Island ; Arrowfield Church ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Eleven officers of the Seventh New Hampshire were killed in the assault on Fort Wagner. This was 
the largest number of officers killed in any one action of the war, belonging to any one regiment. After the naval 
bombardment of Fort Wagner had ceased July i, 1863 the assaulting column of troops was formed on the 
beach in the fast-deepening gloom of the southern twilight, and, then, when the night had already set in, advanced 
against the fort, guided only by the flashes of the garrison s rifles and the fire which streamed from the rmu/les 
of the heavy guns. Although the assault was a failure, some of the men succeeded in forcing an entrance, 
Colonel Putnam, who commanded the Second Brigade, falling dead within the fort. The casualties amounted to 
41 killed, 1 19 wounded, and 56 missing ; of the latter, few ever returned. In February, 1864, the regiment, 650 
strong, sailed from Hilton Head with Seymour s Division, bound for Florida. It was engaged on the 2oth, in the 
disastrous affair at Olustee, Fla., with a loss of 209 killed, wounded, and missing. In April, 1864, it proceeded 
to Virginia, where it joined the Army of the James, taking an honorable part in all the battles of the Tenth Corps. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas A. Henderson fell, mortally wounded, at Deep Bottom. The regiment participated 
in the successful storming of Fort Fisher, after which it remained in North Carolina, being then a part of Abbott s 
Brigade, Tenth Corps. It was mustered out at Goldsbo rough, N. C., July 17, 1865. 



142 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



NINTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
GRIFFIN S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ENOCH R. FELLOWS. 



(2) COL. HERBERT B. TITUS ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WODNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


. 
I 
2 
I 

2 
I 
I 
I 

I 






8 

7 

9 
18 

1 1 
M 

10 

7 

7 

12 


* 

9 
9 

IO 

18 

!3 

15 

1 1 

8 
8 

12 


2 


* 

* 


I 







I 

21 

I? 

II 

M 
*7 

15 
M 

2O 

16 

27 


3 

21 

17 

I I 

14 

7 

16 

M 

20 

16 

27 


!3 
IOI 

99 
97 

IOI 

103 

IOI 

88 
87 
95 
94 


f ornnanv A . 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


I 


K 




Totals 


IO 




103 
42 


"3 
42 


3 




J 73 
78 


176 

78 


979 

885 








10 


J 45 


1 55 


3 


25 1 


254 


1,864 





Original enrollment, 979 ; killed, 113= 11.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 563 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 39. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

South Mountain, Md 2 

Antietam, Md 15 

Fredericksburg, Va i o 

Jackson, Miss 2 

Wilderness, Va i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 62 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va i 

Petersburg Mine, Va 25 

Petersburg trenches, Va 13 

Peeble s Farm, Va 15 

Picket, Va., Oct. 5, 64 i 



Spotsylvania, Va , May 18 6 

Present, also, at North Anna, Va. ; Weldon Railroad, Va. ; Cold Harbor, Va. ; Hatcher s Run, Va. ; Fort 
Stedman, Va. ; Fall of Petersburg, Va. 

NOTES. Organized at Concord, N. H. Leaving the State August 25, 1862, it was engaged, within twenty days, 
at the battle of South Mountain, Md. Its casualties in that fight were 29 killed and wounded. Though a new 
regiment and under fire for the first time, it took a creditable part in the action; it was then in Nagle s (ist) 
Brigade, Sturgis (2d) Division, Ninth Corps. Three days later it fought at Antietam, with a loss of 10 killed, and 
49 Wounded. At Fredericksburg, under command of Colonel Titus, the Ninth was engaged, losing 4 killed, 
68 wounded, and 12 missing. In March, 1863, the Ninth Corps moved to Kentucky, and was stationed at 
various parts of the State. It was a pleasant change from the war-worn fields of Virginia, the men enjoying the 
good food and quarters there provided. In June the Ninth Corps joined Grant s army, then besieging Vicks- 
burg, but returned in August to Kentucky. The spring of 1864 found the Corps in Virginia again. At Spotsyl 
vania, the gallant old regiment was hotly engaged, holding its position against a desperate counter-charge of the 
enemy ; so close were the two lines that their rifles flashed in each other s faces. Two companies were on the 
skirmish line; the eight companies in action about 400 men lost 41 killed, 95 wounded, and 48 missing. 
The regiment remained in Potter s Division until the close of the war. 



* Of the recruits, 466 deserted, most of them (444) while on their way to the regiment. They were conscripts. 



THKEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



H3 



ELEVENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
FERRERO S BRIGADE STURGIS S DIVISION NINTH CORI>S. 



COL. WALTER IIARRIMAN ; Bvr. BRIO. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED op Worsos. 


DIED or DIKEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I ICINUN, <tc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


M 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


i 






i 

i 

i 



i 






5 
16 

i? 
10 

6 
6 
16 
6 

9 
10 


I 

1 5 
16 

17 
10 

7 
7 

7 
6 

10 
10 






i 








* 

M 

10 
10 
12 

4 

12 

16 

19 

1 1 

10 




4 
10 
1 1 

I 2 

M 
I 2 
16 

1 9 
1 1 

IO 


5 

101 
101 
101 
101 

95 

IOI 

98 

IO2 
IOI 

93 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 






5 




1 1 1 
29 


116 
29 


i 




128 
23 


129 
23 


1,009 
630 








5 


140 


45 


i 


1 S 1 


52 


6 39 





Original enrollment, 1,009 , killed, 116 11.4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 528 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 18. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 40 

Morristown, Tenn i 

Jackson, Miss 2 

Knoxville, Tenn i 

Wilderness, Va i o 



BATTLE*. K. A M.W 

Spotsylvania, Va 27 

Bethesda Church, Va o. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 22 

Petersburg Mine, Va 23 

Peeble s Farm, Va i o 



Present, also, at Siege of Vicksburg ; North Anna, Va. ; Cold Harbor, Va. ; Weldon Railroad, Va. ; Peebles 
Farm, Va. ; Hatcher s Run, Va. ; Fort Stedman, Va. ; Fall of Petersburg. 

NOTES. Recruited under the second call for troops, leaving New Hampshire on September 1 1, 1862. After two 
weeks drill on Arlington Heights, Va., it joined General McClellan s Army (Oct. 4th) then at Harper s Ferry, and 
was brigaded with General Ferrero s command, Sturgis s (2d) Division, Ninth Corps. The Eleventh saw its first 
battle at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, where it behaved with extraordinary gallantry, its conduct receiving 
universal commendation. Its losses on that day were 19 killed, 151 wounded, and 25 missing; total, 195. The 
Ninth Corps passed the greater part of 1863 in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi. He fore going to the 
West, there was a month s preparatory stay at Newport News, Va., which with the time spent in Kentucky was 
the pleasantest period in the existence of the regiment. It was a time of blue skies, green fields, comfortable 
quarters, good food, and pleasant journeys by land and water. The Eleventh participated, without loss, in 
the investment of Vicksburg, but in the following siege operations at Jackson, Miss., it lost i killed, and i z 
wounded. It was also engaged in the Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., in November, 1863, a campaign notable for its 
hardships and privations. Leaving Tennessee in April, 1864, the regiment rejoined the Army of the Potomac 
(Griffin s Brigade. Potter s Division). Lieutenant Colonel Moses N. Collins was killed at the Wilderness ; the regi 
ment was engaged at the Petersburg Mine with a loss of 9 killed, 32 wounded, and 22 missing; and in all the 
subsequent battles of the corps, adding to its reputation for hard fighting and heavy losses. 



* With the recruits are included 403 conscripts or mercenaries who deserted und never joined the regiment. 



144 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWELFTH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY. 
CARR S BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(l)CoL JOSEPH H. POTTER; BRIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. THOMAS E. BARKER. 



COM TAN IKS. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 

2 



2 
2 
1 
I 
I 

* 

I 






!? 

J 5 

10 

14 

II 

12 
11 
16 

15 
II 


I 

9 

15 

12 

16 

12 

3 

12 

16 
16 
1 1 


I 














15 

9 
ii 

10 

1 3 

8 

4 

10 

9 
12 


I 

15 
*9 

II 

10 

3 

8 

4 
10 

J 9 

12 


3 
98 

IO2 
IO2 
IO2 
IOI 
101 
1O2 
IOI 
IOI 
IOI 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F . 


G . 


H . 


T 


K . 


Totals. 


II 




132 

38 


M3 

38 


I 




121 

7 


122 

!? 


1,024 
426 




Totals 


I I 


I 7 


181 


I 


138 


39 


i,45 





181 killed = 12.4 per cent. 
Of the 1,024 originally enrolled, 143 were killed = 13.9 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 659. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 2 

Chancellorsville, Va 72 

Gettysburg, Pa 26 

Port Walthall, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 5 

Cold Harbor, Va 66 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 2 



Present, also, at Swift Creek ; Fall of Richmond. 

NOTES. Organized at Concord, N. H., September 10, 1862, the ten companies having been recruited within 
ten days time, and arrived at Arlington Heights, Va., on September 3Oth. The heaviest loss in the battle of 
Chancellorsville fell to the lot of the Twelfth New Hampshire ; it fought there in Whipple s Division, Third Corps. 
In the fighting on Sunday morning it faced for a long time a musketry fire of extraordinary severity, and having 
held its position long after the troops on either side had fallen back, it retired slowly and in good order to avoid 
capture. It entered that engagement with 21 officers and 537 men, (official report) losing 41 killed, 213 wounded, 
and 63 missing ; total, 317. The most of the missing were killed or wounded men who were left on the field and 
fell into the hands of the enemy. At Gettysburg, 21 officers and 224 men went into action, sustaining a loss of 
14 killed, 67 wounded, and n missing. Soon after this battle, the Twelfth, in company with the Second and 
Fifth New Hampshire, was assigned to duty at Point Lookout, Mel., as guards at the military prison, remaining 
there eight months. The regiment received in the meanwhile an assignment of 450 conscripts and mercenaries, 
over 100 of whom deserted on their way to the front. When the Twelfth took the field in 1864, it was in Wistar s 
Brigade, Weitzel s (2d) Division, Eighteenth Corps. At Cold Harbor it lost 23 killed, 126 wounded, and 15 
missing, out of less than 300 men engaged in the assault. In December, 1864, it was placed in Donohoe s 
Brigade, Devens s Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. This brigade was the first infantry command that entered 
Richmond. The adjutant-general of New Hampshire states in his official report that " no regiment left the state 
with men of finer personal appearance, or of more gentlemanly bearing." 



TlIRKK HUNDKKD Fl(iHTINU 



145 



FIRST VERMONT CAVALRY. 
FARNSWORTH S BRIGADE -- KILPATRICK S DIVISION --CAVALRY CORPS. 



(1) COL. JONAS P HOLLIDAY ; Z \?. fc. *. (Died.) 
0,) COL. EDWAHI) P. SAWYER. 



(3) COL. WILLIAM WELLS; HVT. MAJ. (Jr.x. 

(4) COL JOSIAII HALL 



(. ON PAS IKS. 


Kll I.I. H AND UlKI) OK WOUNDS. 


DlKI) OF DlSF.ASK, ACCIDKNTS. 


N I KIMIN, V 

ToUil. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Field and Staff 


I 



I 
2 



2 
1 
I 
1 



I 


I 
1 2 

9 
10 

7 
16 

10 
2 
I I 
I I 

6 

5 
4 


2 
12 
2O 
IO 

7 
18 

10 

4 

12 
12 

7 
5 
5 


2 



2 












I 
22 

25 
32 
2 9 

7 
2 9 

35 
2 5 
24 

21 

19 
21 


3 

22 

27 
3 2 
2 9 

7 
29 

35 
25 
24 

21 

9 

21 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


10 


124 


34 


4 


300 


34 





Total 

Kurolltiiftii 



2 I 
189 
.76 
I9O 
I 9 2 
18 7 
182 
198 

93 

3 
1 80 

45 
127 



2,163 



The loss by disease includes 149 deaths in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Woodstock, May 20, 1862 i 

Middletown, May 24, 1862 3 

Action, April 27, 1862 

Winchester, May 25, 1862 

Milford, July 2, 1862 

Orange C. H., Aug. 2, 1862 

Rappahannock, Aug. 22, 1862 

Ashby s Gap, Sept. 22, 1862 i 

Broad Run, April I, 1863 3 

Greenwich, May 30, 1863 i 

Gettysburg, July 3, 1863 21 

Cashtown, July 5, 1863 i 

Hagerstown, July 6, 1863 S 

Boonsboro, July 9, 1863 i 

Culpeper, Sept. 13, 1863 I 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Picket, Sept. 26, 1863 i 

Brandy Station, Oct. 1 1, 1863 3 

Rapidan, Feb. 3, 1864 i 

Richmond, Mch. i, 1864 4 

Richmond, Mch. 2, 1864 i 

Craig s Church, May 5, 1864 10 

Yellow Tavern, May 11,1864 3 

Strawberry Hill, May 12, 1864 3 

In action, May 30, 1864 i 

Ashland, June I, 1864 3 

Salem Church, June 3, 1864 3 

In action, June 12, 1864 i 

White Oak Swamp, June 14, 1864. . . i 

Malvern Hill, June 15, 1864 2 

Prince Geo. C. H., June 21, 1864 . . i 



BATTI.KS. K.&M.W. 

Nottoway C. H., June 23, 1864 .... 4 

Stony Creek, June 29, 1864 /i 

In action, July 2, 1864 i 

Lcetown, Aug. 25, 1864 4 

Front Royal, Sept. 21, 1864 I 

Skirmish, Oct. 6, 1864 I 

Columbia Furnace, Oct. 7, 1864 ... 7 

Columbia Furnace, Oct. 8, 1864 ... i 

Mount Olive, Oct. 9, 1864 3 

Kcrnstown, Nov. n, 1864 I 

Cedar Springs, Nov. 12, 1864 4 

Waynesboro, Mch. 2, 1865 i 

Petersburg, April 3, 1865 2 

Appomattox, April 18, 1865 t 

Picket, skirmishes, places unknown S 



NOTES. Organized at Burlington, Vt., leaving the State December 14, 1 86 r, with ten companies only ; Com 
panies L and M were not recruited until a year later. In the spring of 1862 it was assigned to duty in Banks s 
Corps, then in the Shenandoah Valley, whereupon its active service immediately commenced. It formed part of 
a cavalry brigade, under General John P. Hatch, with which it took an active part in the fighting at Winchester, 
May 25, 1862, and on Banks s retreat. In these operations the regiment, acting as a rear guard, lost 105 men, 
captured or missing, in addition to their killed and wounded. At Gettysburg it was in Farnsworth s (ist) Brigade, 
Kilpatrick s (3d) Division, Cavalry Corps. On the third day of that battle, Kilpatrick committed the serious 
error of ordering Farnsworth to charge a large body of Confederate infantry who held a strong |>osition, protected 
by stone walls. Farnsworth s men, led by the First Vermont, leaping their horses over the intervening walls 
and fences, made a gallant but useless attack; Farnsworth was killed, and the regiment lost 13 killed, 25 
wounded, and 27 missing. The First Vermont was one of the best mounted regiments in the service. In addition 
to the actions mentioned in the above list, in which it lost men killed or mortally wounded, it participated in as 
many more, in which it sustained losses in wounded or prisoners. 
10 



146 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIRST VERMONT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
VERMONT BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES M. WARNER, OT. P., &. *3.; BVT. BRIG. GEN., U. S. A. 



(2) COL. CHARLES HUNSDON. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


2 
2 
I 
2 








I 
2 




21 
M 
17 

9 

12 

J 5 

8 

8 

9 
M 

H 

!3 


2 

2 3 
IS 
19 

9 

12 
5 

8 
8 

9 
*4 

5 

IS 





1 









I 







54 
24 

34 

28 

22 

5 2 
2 3 

5* 
26 

38 
36 

22 




54 
25 
34 
28 

22 
52 
2 3 

5 1 
26 

39 
36 

22 


21 
192 

186 
188 

194 
193 

192 
188 
188 
191 
196 
191 
160 




B 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H. 


I 


K 


L 


M 




Totals 


IO 


154 


164 


2 


4IO 


412 


2,280 





Total of killed and wounded, 583 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 167. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K. &M.W. 



Spotsylvama, Va., May 1 2-2 1 , 61 8 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va. (assault) 37 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 10 

Petersburg, Va., 1864 3 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 23, 64 31 



Charlestown, W. Va 13 

Opequon, Va 20 

Cedar Creek, Va 24 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 65 3 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 10 

Place Unknown 2 



On Picket, Va i 

Present, also, at Fort Stevens, D. C. ; Fisher s Hill, Va. ; Mount Jackson, Va. ; Sailor s Creek, Va. 



NOTES. Organized at Brattleboro, Vt., as an infantry command, but was changed to heavy artillery December 
10, 1862, while on duty in Washington. The additional companies, L. and M. made necessary by this change, 
were recruited in July and October, 1863. The regiment was assigned to garrison duty within the defences of 
Washington, occupying Forts Slocum, Totten, and Stevens. It remained at Washington until May 12, 1864, when 
it moved, 1,500 strong, to join the Army of the Potomac. Although nominally a heavy artillery regiment, it 
served as infantry, the only difference being in its larger organization ; it had 12 companies of 150 men each, with 
a captain and four lieutenants for each company, forming three battalions with a major for each. The regiment 
arrived at the front on May i5th, when it was assigned to the Vermont Brigade, and two days later it went into 
action near Spotsylvania. On June ist, Major Fleming s Battalion was engaged in the storming of Cold Harbor, 
with a loss of 13 killed and 107 wounded. In the affair at the Weldon Railroad, June 23d, the regiment lost 9 
killed, 36 wounded, and 257 captured or missing, the captured men belonging to Fleming s Battalion. It was 
next engaged in Sheridan s campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, where Lieutenant Colonel Chamberlin fell 
mortally wounded in the fight at Charlestown. At the Opequon, the regiment lost 8 killed, 85 wounded, and 6 
missing; and at Cedar Creek, 13 killed, 74 wounded, and 20 missing. Returning to Petersburg, it was engaged 
in the final and victorious assault, with a loss of 5 killed and 45 wounded. 



TlIKKK HUNDRED FUJIITIXO RrXJIMKNTS. 



147 



SECOND VERMONT INFANTRY. 
VERMONT BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION -SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY WHITING, tgl. p.. B. *. 

(2) COL. JAMES II. WALBUUHJE. 



(5) Coi.. AMASA S. THACY. 



(3) COL. NKWTON STONE (Killed). 

(4) COL. JOHN H. TYLKK (Killed). 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIKD or DIMKAKR, ArriDKNTx, IN I KINON. Ac. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 
20 

9 
13 

2 3 
26 

16 

1 1 

7 
5 

25 


Total. 



20 

9 

3 

2 3 
26 

16 
1 1 

i? 
5 

2 5 


Field and Staff 


2 



I 
I 



2 








I 
2S 

5 
21 

23 
26 
2O 
21 

19 

24 
2O 


3 

28 

16 

22 

23 
28 
2O 
21 

19 
24 
2O 








* 







B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


6 


218 


224 





75 


75 





Total 
Enrollment. 



3 
209 

1 68 
169 
.78 
197 

>79 

1 68 

170 
-76 
184 



i,8n 



224 killed 12.3 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 887 ; Loss by disease includes 22 deaths in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

First Bull Run, Va 5 

Lee s Mills, Va., April 16,1862 2 

Yorktown, Va., April 30, 1862 3 

Savage Station, Va S 

Antietam, Md i 

Fredericksburg, Va 5 

Marye s Heights, Va 1 6 

Banks s Ford, Va 10 

Funkstown, Md i 

Gunboat service, Miss i 



BATTLE-. K. & M \V. 

Wilderness, Va., May 5-6 80 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 10-13 4^ 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 7 

Charlestown, W. Va 5 

Opequon, Va 7 

Cedar Creek, Va 10 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 3 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 10 

Picket Line, Va., Sept. 1 1 , 1 86 1 i 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; (folding s Farm ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; Crampton s Gap ; 
Salem Heights ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock Station ; Fort Stevens ; Fisher s Hill ; Sailor s Creek. 

NOTES. Organized at Burlington, leaving the State June 24, 1861. The Second rendered important service 
on many battle fields, though with comparatively small casualty lists, until May 3, 1863, when it was hotly engaged 
at the storming of Marye s Heights, and in the covering of the retreat on the next day f at Banks s Ford. The 
brigade was then in Howe s Division, Sixth Corps; the losses of the regiment in the two days actions were 17 
killed and 1 16 wounded At the Wilderness it lost 49 killed, 285 wounded, and 14 missing, a total of 348 out of 
about 700 men engaged. In this battle Colonel Stone fell dead from his horse, and Lieutenant-Colonel Tyler, 
who succeeded him, received a mortal wound. The next week, the regiment fought at Spotsylvania, with a 
loss of 27 killed, 80 wounded, and 16 missing; total, 123. The Second participated in all the battles of the 
Sixth Corps, serving from first to last in the Second Brigade of the Second Division. It was engaged in the final 
battles about Petersburg; and, at Sailor s Creek, while skirmishing with the rear guard of the retreating enemy, 
the men of the Second fired the last shots of the Sixth Corps ; though a matter of chance, the honor could not 
have been better awarded. 



148 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRD VERMONT INFANTRY. 
VERMONT BRIGADE-- GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) Coi.. WILLIAM F. SMITH ; OT.tf., B. a.; Bvr. MAJ.-GEN. U. S. A. 

(2) COL. BREED NOYES HYDE ; OT. $. 



.(3) COL. THOMAS O. SEAVER. 
(4) COL. HORACE W. FLOYD. 



COM TAN IKS. 


KILLED AND DIED ov WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff. . 


1 
I 

I 
1 






I 




>4 
IO 

17 
26 

15 

34 

21 
M 

2 5 
2 S 


I 

5 
1 1 

iS 

26 
15 

34 

21 

M 
26 

25 





I 

* 







1 
IO 

5 
i5 

12 

23 
I? 
12 

14 
26 

*9 


I 
IO 

5 

16 

12 

23 

*7 

12 

M 
26 

J 9 


7 
190 

171 
214 
162 
163 

S3 
134 
,36 
202 
i 76 




B . 


r . 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G. 


H 


T . 


K. 


T otals 


5 


201 


2O6 


I 


164 


65 


.,748 





206 killed = 11.7 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 679. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Lewinsville, Va 2 

Lee s Mills, Va 35 

Savage Station, Va 

Antietam, Md i 

First Fredericksburg, Va 3 

Second Fredericksbuig, Va 4 

Funkstown, Md 2 

Wilderness, Va 68 

Spotsylvania, Va 27 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

North Anna, Va., May 21 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 29 

Petersburg, Va., June 20 i 

Fort Stevens, D. C i 

Charlestown, W. Va 4 

Opequon, Va 5 

Fisher s Hill, Va 2 

Cedar Creek, Va 6 

Fall of Petersburg 6 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Gokling s Farm; Savage Station; White Oak Swamp; Crampton s Gap; 
Marye o Heights ; Salem Heights ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock ; Weldon Railroad. 



NOTES. The physique of this regiment was unusually fine, the men averaging 5 feet loj inches in height, 
and 161 pounds in weight. On the i6th of April, 1862, occurred the remarkable action at Lee s Mills, on the 
Warwick River, one of the defences of Yorktovvn. Four companies of the Third D, E, F, and K forded 
the stream in the face of the enemy, with a view of making a reconnoissance in force. Through mismanagement 
and lack of support they were driven back, with a loss of 89 killed and wounded, out of the 192 officers and 
men that crossed. The detachment was ably commanded by Captain Samuel E. Pingree, who was wounded 
twice during the fight. The regiment crossed the Rapidan, May 4, 1864, with about 600 effectives, under com 
mand of Colonel Seaver. On the following day, in the battle of the Wilderness, it lost 38 killed, 167 
wounded, and 6 missing; total, 211. At Spotsylvania it lost 21 killed, and 53 wounded. At Cold Harbor, 
the gallant Seaver, who commanded the regiment at Marye s Heights and in most all its battles, again led 
them in a bloody assault ; though there were less than 300 in line there, the casualties were 14 killed, and 53 
wounded, and 5 missing. On July 16, 1864, the remnant of the regiment was mustered out, the recruits and 
reenlisted men having been consolidated into a battalion of six companies which remained in the field. 



TllUKK llUNDHKD FlUHTINU REGIMENTS. 



14!) 



FOURTH VERMONT INFANTRY. 

VERMONT BRIGADE -GETTY S DIVISION --SIXTH CORPS. 



(1> COL. EDWIN H. STOUOIITON. 1H. Jj).; BRIO. OEN. (2) COL. CHARLES H. STOH WTOV. (3) COL. OEOHOE P. FOSTKR : BVT. BRIO. OEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED ANI DIED or Worxiw. 


DlKII OF DlMEANE, AWIUKNTH, Is 1 KlnoN, Ac. 


Total 

Knriilliiii-iil 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


< >fticon. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




3 

2 
2 
I 



2 



I 

I 


18 

10 
20 

9 

IO 

I I 

19 

18 
3 

12 




21 
10 
22 
21 
I I 
II 
21 

18 

14 
13 




* 





I 




I 




2 9 
2 9 

37 

35 
28 

21 

2 3 
21 

2 3 

33 
279 


* 

2 9 
2 9 

37 

35 
28 

21 
24 
21 

2 3 

33 


1 6 

170 

57 

73 
,67 

171 

5 
166 

172 
.58 
58 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


12 


5 


162 


280 


1,658 





Total of killed and wounded, 556; loss by disease includes 77 deaths in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. K. A M \V 

Lee s Mills, Va 4 

Picket, May 23, 1 862 i 

Crampton s Gap, Md 3 

Antietam, Md 3 

First Fredericksburg 14 

Banks s Ford, Va i 

Funkstown, Md 2 

Wilderness, Va 84 



BATTLKS. K.&M.NV. 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 

Cold Harbor, Va 9 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 10 

Charlestown, W. Va 2 

Opequon, Va., Sept. 13, 1864 i 

Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 

Cedar Creek, Va i o 

Petersburg, Va., 1865 3 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Golding s Farm ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Marye s Heights ; 
Salem Heights ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock , Fisher s Hill ; Sailor s Creek. 



NOTES. The Fourth left Brattleboro on the 2ist of September, 1861, joining the other regiments of the 
brigade at Chain Bridge, Va. It was engaged on picket duty, varied by an occasional reconnoissance, until 
March, 1862, when active service in the field commenced. It passed through the Peninsular and Maryland 
campaigns with slight loss, no close fighting occurring until it engaged the enemy at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 
1862. In that battle it fought on the skirmish line, where it lost 11 killed, 43 wounded, and 2 missing; 4 men 
were killed and 14 wounded, in Company B, by a single discharge of canister. At the Wilderness, Colonel 
Foster commanding, the regiment encountered a terrible musketry fire, losing 41 killed, 223 wounded, and 4 
missing a total of 268, out of less than 600 engaged ; 7 officers were killed and 10 wounded, while the missing 
ones all met the same fate. On June 23, 1864, in the affair at the Weldon Railroad, 8 officers and 133 men of 
the regiment were surrounded and captured, together with four companies of the Eleventh Vermont. Half of 
these men died in confederate prisons. Two hundred and ten of the men reenlisted, which, together with the 
recruits, preserved the organization after the muster-out in September, 1864, enabling the regiment to still hold 
its place in the renowned brigade and participate in all the subsequent battles of the corps. 



150 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTH VERMONT INFANTRY. 
VERMONT BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY A. SMALLEY ; fflJH. tf ., &. a. 

(2) COL. LEWIS A. GRANT ; BVT. MAJ.-GEN. 



(3) COL. JOHN A. LEWIS ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 

(4) COL. RONALD A. KENNEDY. 



COM PA NIKS. 


KILLED AND DIED op WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

3 

2 

m 

2 



I 



I 
I 




J 7 
20 

22 

19 

36 
20 

19 

15 

2O 

14 


I 

2O 

22 
22 
21 

36 
21 

T 9 
5 

21 

5 


I 

* 











I 

T 7 
8 

ii 

M 
3 

12 

, 7 

12 
13 

16 


2 
J 7 

8 
ii 

M 
J 3 

12 

7 

12 

3 
16 


J 9 
181 

147 
161 

65 
178 
127 

*39 

128 

M7 
141 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H. 


I 


K 


Totals 


I I 


2O2 


213 


I 


124 


125 


i,533 





213 killed = i3.8 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 685. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Lee s Mills, Va 2 

Golding s Farm, Va i 

Savage Station, Va 72 

First Fredericksburg, Va i 

Second Fredericksburg, Va 5 

Gettysburg, Pa i 

Funkstown, Md 3 

Wilderness, Va 63 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 23 

Cold Harbor, Va 1 1 

Petersburg, Va. (1864) i 

Charlestown, W. Va 3 

Opequon, Va 9 

Cedar Creek, Va 5 

Petersburg, Va., Mch. 25, 1865 3 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 10 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; White Oak Swamp ; Crampton s Gap ; Antietam ; Marye s Heights ; Salem 
Heights ; Rappahannock Station ; Fisher s Hill ; Sailor s Creek. 

NOTES. At the battle of Savage Station the heaviest loss, by far, was sustained by the Fifth Vermont. In 
compliance with orders to advance and push back the enemy, General Brooks, commanding the Vermont 
Brigade, moved forward into the woods on the left of the line. The Fifth, in its advance, stepped over a regi 
ment which, refusing to advance further, had thrown themselves on the ground. The Fifth forced its way into 
the enemy s lines so far that, having lost connection, it encountered a severe canister fire on its flank. Facing 
some of the companies to meet the flank attack, it maintained its advanced position and silenced the enemy s 
fire. It retired a few hours later in company with the brigade, joining the Army in its movement to the James. 
The regiment took 428 officers and men into this fight ; its casualties were 45 killed, and 143 wounded Company 
E losing 44 men out of 59 in line, 25 of whom were killed. In February, 1863, Colonel Grant was promoted to 
the command of the brigade, remaining in that position until the end of the war. He was succeded by Colonel 
Lewis, who led the regiment in the battle of the Willderness, the losses there amounting to 33 killed, 187 wounded, 
and 26 missing. Colonel Lewis being severely wounded, was succeeded by Major Charles P. Dudley, who lost 
his life at Spotsylvania. In February, 1865, Captain Kennedy, of the Third Vermont, was appointed colonel. He 
led the regiment in its brilliant assault at Petersburg, April 2, 1865, where the flag of the Fifth was the the first in 
the corps to wave over the enemy s works. 



TllREK HUNDRED FltJHTINO RmiMENTS. 



151 



SIXTH VERMONT INFANTRY. 
VERMONT BRIGADE -GETTY S DIVISION -SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. NATHAN LOUD, Jit. 
(8) COL. OSCAR L. TfTTLK. 



(3) COL. I-I.lsl! \ L. BAHNEY (Killed). 

(4) Cot. SfMXKK 11. LINCOLN. 



COM VAN IKS. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED of DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, Is I HISON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


officers. 


Mm. Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 
2 



I 
I 



3 

i 
i 


* 




16 

I 2 
26 

2 3 
7 
16 

i? 
1 8 

2 5 

21 


3 
18 

12 

2 7 
24 

7 

9 

18 

9 

25 

21 


I 



I 

* 
* 


I 





I 
26 
26 

35 
2 3 
i? 

10 
20 

*9 

21 

M 


2 
26 
26 

35 
24 

>7 
10 

20 
20 

2 I 
4 


16 
56 
54 
161 

35 
146 

,36 
1 86 
.67 
1 66 

45 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 




12 


I 9 I 


203 


3 


2 I 2 


2I 5 


1,568 





203 killed 1 2. 9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 674; loss by disease includes 22 deaths in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W 

Wilderness, Va 69 

Spotsylvania, Va 13 

Cold Harbor, Va i o 

Petersburg, Va., 1 864 2 

Charlestown, VV. Va 1 1 

Opequon, Va 13 

Cedar Creek, Va 12 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 4 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Lee s Mills, Va 23 

Yorktown, Va., April 29, 1862 i 

Savage Station, Va 21 

First Fredericksburg, Va i 

Marye s Heights, Va i 

Banks s Ford, Va., May 4, 1863 i o 

Franklin s Crossing, Va., June 6, 1863 4 

Funkstown, Md., July i o, 1 863 7 

Picket duty i 

Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Golding s Farm ; White Oak Swamp ; Crampton s Gap ; Antietam ; Salem 
Heights; Gettysburg; Rappahannock Station ; Fisher s Hill; Sailor s Creek. 

NOTES. It left the State on October 19, 1 86 1, joining the Vermont Brigade at Camp Griffin, Va., near 
Chain Bridge. Within a month one-third of the men were on the sick list, the brigade being attacked by some 
peculiar epidemic, from which the adjoining camps were comparatively exempt. When the regiment took the field 
in March, 1862, over 50 deaths had occurred from disease. Its first experience under fire was at Lee s Mills, Va., 
near Yorktown. In that fight five companies crossed and re-crossed the Warwick River fording it waist deep 
under a sharp fire, with a loss of 13 killed and 67 wounded. In the affair at Funkstown, Md., July 10, 
1863, the Vermont Brigade, with no supports near, held successfully a long skirmish line against an attack made 
by a strong force of Confederate infantry. Its efficiency in this action was fully recognized in the official reports 
of both division and corps commanders. The loss of the Sixth at Funkstown was 3 killed and 19 wounded, the 
men having fought mostly under cover. At the Wilderness the regiment lost 34 killed, 155 wounded, and 7 
missing; total, 196. Colonel Barney, who commanded the Sixth at Marye s Heights and in the subsequent 
campaigns, was killed at the Wilderness. At the Opequon the Sixth lost 5 killed and 45 wounded ; and at Cedar 
Creek, 5 killed, 32 wounded, and 11 missing. The original regiment was mustered out October 16, 1864, 
leaving about 320 effectives recruits and reenlisted men in the field. 



152 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TENTH VERMONT INFANTRY. 
MORRIS S BRIGADE RiCKETTs s DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ALBERT B. JEWETT. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM W. HENRY; BVT. Bum. GEN. 



(3) COL. GEORGE B. DAMON. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 
I 
I 



2 
I 



2 






10 

14 
I I 
10 

13 

12 
2O 

18 
16 
16 


2 
1 I 

15 
I I 

12 

14 

12 

22 

18 
16 
16 

















25 

9 

17 

21 
24 

I? 

T 9 
16 

2 5 
20 




2 5 

9 
17 

21 
24 
!? 
19 

16 

2 5 

20 


14 
138 
124 
126 
136 
130 
128 
136 

116 
34 

122 




B . 


r , 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H. 


T 


K . 




9 


140 


149 





203 


203 


i,34 





149 killed = 11.3 percent. 
Total killed and wounded, 502 ; of the deaths from disease, 36 occurred in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



Orange Grove, Va 1 6 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 54 

Guerillas, Va i 

Monocacy, Md 5 

Skirmishes 3 



Present, also, at Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 



K. & M.W. 
.... 16 



Opequon, Va 

Fisher s Hill, Va 2 

Cedar Creek, Va 27 

Petersburg, March 25, 1865 3 

Fall of Petersburg i o 

Picket Line i 

Place Unknown 3 



NOTES. Organized at Brattleboro, Vt., under the second call for troops. Leaving the State September, 
1862, it was stationed on guard duty in Maryland until July, 1863, when it joined the Army of the Potomac, soon 
after the battle of Gettysburg. It was assigned to Morris s (ist) Brigade, Carr s (3d) Division, Sixth Corps. 
Under command of Colonel Jewett, the Tenth first encountered the enemy at Locust Grove (Mine Run) in 
which action it took a commendable part, losing n killed, 56 wounded, and 2 missing. In March, 1864, the 
Third Corps having been discontinued, the division was transferred to the Sixth Corps. The division, under 
command of General Ricketts, took a prominent part in the storming of Cold Harbor. The regiment, under 
Colonel Henry, suffered severely in this unsuccessful assault, its casualties amounting to 28 killed, 131 
wounded, and 3 missing. At the battle of the Opequon, it lost 12 killed and 53 wounded, Major Edwin 
Dillingham being among the killed. It took 17 officers and 260 men into action at Cedar Creek, losing there 16 
killed, 65 wounded, and 4 missing. The campaign in the Shenandoah Valley having been successfully ended, the 
Sixth Corps returned to Petersburg in December. The Tenth was engaged in the grand, victorious assault on the 
lines about Petersburg, April 2, 1865, with a loss of 44 killed and wounded, and was the first regiment in the 
division to plant its colors inside the enemy s works. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



SEVENTEENTH VERMONT INFANTRY. 



GRIFFIN S BRIGADE - POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



COL. FRANCIS V. RAM) ALL. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUND*. 


DIED or DIMEAMK, ACCIIJENTS, IN I UIHON. Ac. 


Total 
Knrollnifiil. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 



2 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
2 
I 




18 

3 
16 

16 

9 
18 

15 
4 
10 

4 


3 
18 

S 

!? 

! 7 
10 

9 
16 

16 
ii 

5 




i 








* 





18 

9 
M 
U 
16 
8 
1 1 

10 

1 1 
5 




9 
9 
M 

4 

16 
8 
1 1 

10 

1 1 

5 


4 
,36 
124 

"3 
124 

114 

127 

8? 
90 

87 

121 


( \ Hiinsinv -\ . 


B 


c . 


D . 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


M 


133 


47 


i 


116 


117 


1,137 





147 killed 12.9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 376; Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 28. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 21 

Spotsylvania, Va 23 

Hanovertown, Va i 

Picket, Va., May 15, 1864 i 

Bethesda Church, Va 5 

Cold Harbor, Va 10 



BATTLES. 

Petersburg Assault, Va. . . . 
Petersburg Trenches, Va . 

Petersburg Mine, Va 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 
Poplar Spring Church, Va. 
Place Unknown 



K. & M. W. 

.... 15 

, . . . 22 

... 1 6 

... 15 

14 

4 



Present, also, at North Anna ; Weldon Railroad ; Boydton Road ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort Stedman. 



NOTES. Although the Seventeenth was in service only one year, yet it saw more fighting and sustained greater 
losses in action than three-fourths of the regiments in the whole Union Army. It left the State April 18, 1864, with 
seven companies, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings ; two weeks later it went into action at 
the Wilderness. Though without drill or necessary preparation the regiment moved steadily under fire, its colors 
waving on the line of the farthest advance. Owing to the prevalence of an epidemic in the ranks, it took only 
313 muskets into that action, losing 8 killed, 63 wounded, and 3 missing. The next week, led by Major Reynolds, 
it fought at Spotsylvania. its casualties there amounting to 10 killed and 60 wounded. At the Mine Explosion it 
lost 8 killed, 22 wounded, and 23 missing-- Major Reynolds and 5 line officers losing their lives in this affair. 
The regiment also sustained heavy loses at Petersburg, both in the general assault of June i8th, and in the 
trenches, where, for months, men were killed or wounded every day. Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings, who was 
wounded at the Wilderness, resumed command at the battle of Poplar Grove Church, but only to lose his life in 
that battle. Three more companies joined the regiment during the summer and fall of 1864. On April 2, 1865, 
the Seventeenth took part in the storming of the works at Petersburg its last battle losing in that action 8 
killed, 39 wounded, and 2 missing. It was mustered out July 14, 1865. 



154: 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIRST MASSACHUSETTS HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
TANNATT S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM B. GREENE, OT. $. 

(2) COL. THOMAS R. TANNATT, OT lp., 



(3) COL. LEVI P. WRIGHT. 

(4) COL. NATHANIEL SIIATSWELL. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 






I 
I 



2 
I 

2 

* 

I 




24 
20 

16 

i? 

16 

i? 

J 3 
16 

15 
3 2 

21 

2 5 


I 

24 
20 

16 

17 

*7 
18 

J 3 
18 

16 

34 

21 
26 


I 



I 





* 



* 




J 3 

21 

M 
12 

3 2 
26 
27 
II 

33 
J 5 
J 5 

22 


I 

13 

22 

M 

12 

3 2 
26 

2 7 
II 

33 
J 5 
15 

22 


T 9 

227 

232 

2 33 
206 

2OI 

207 
209 

181 

204 
208 
198 
199 




B 


C . 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


9 


232 


241 


2 


241 


243 


2,524 





Total of killed and wounded, 723 ; captured and missing, 261 ; died In Confederate prisons (previously included), 102. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Fredericksburg Pike, Va 120 

North Anna, Va 3 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 

Deep Bottom, Va 4 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 4 

Boydton Road, Va 3 

Petersburg Va., Assault, June 16, 1864 54 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Petersburg Va., Assault, June 1 7, 1864 3 

Petersburg Va., Assault, June 18, 1864 9 

Jerusalem Road, Va., June 22, 1864 19 

Duncan s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 3 

Vaughn Road, Va., March 31, 1865 3 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 7 



Present, also, at Winchester ; Maryland Heights ; Strawberry Plains ; Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Farm- 
ville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited in Essex County as the Fourteenth Infantry. It left the State August 7, 1861, proceed 
ing to Washington, where it was placed on garrison duty in the forts about there. It was changed to heavy 
artillery in January, 1862, receiving, consequently, fifty new recruits for each company, and two additional com 
panies of 150 men each; two additional lieutenants were assigned to each company, and two additional majors 
were commissioned. The First Battalion was ordered on active field service at Maryland Heights and vicinity, 
but the regiment proper did not go to the front until May, 1864. It then served as an infantry command in 
Grant s Virginia campaign. It joined the Army of the Potomac May 17, 1864, having been assigned to Tyler s 
Division of Heavy Artillery --then serving as infantry. Two days later it met the enemy on the Fredericks- 
burg Pike; it took 1,617 officers and men into that action, sustaining a loss of 50 killed, 312 wounded, and 28 
missing; a total of 390. In the assault on Petersburg -- June 16-18 it lost 29 killed, 183 wounded, and 6 
missing; total, 218. Four days later, in the affair of June 22d, it lost 9 killed, 46 wounded, and 185 missing; 
the latter were mostly captured men, of whom over half died in Confederate prisons. In the campaign of 1865 
the regiment was in Pierce s (2d) Brigade, Mott s (3d) Division, with which command it participated in the 
closing battles of the war. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



155 



FIRST MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
CARR S BRIGADE -- HUMPHREYS S DIVISION -- THIRD CORPS. 



(1) Coi.. ROBERT COVVDIN; BHIU. GEM. U. S. V. 



(2) COL. N. B. McLAUOHLIN, . .; BVT. BRIO. GEN. U. 8. A. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED op Worxns. 


DIEIJ OK DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, Is I IU.HMN, &c. 


ToUtl 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Hen. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 




I 


* 


I 

I 



I 



4 






18 
1 1 
1 1 

12 
I I 
M 

!3 

9 

9 
16 


I 
18 
1 1 
1 1 

13 

12 
14 

M 
9 

3 

16 


I 



* 









I 

8 

9 
6 

8 

7 
8 

5 
8 

10 
8 


2 
8 

9 
6 
8 

7 
8 

5 
8 

10 

8 


18 

55 
166 

1 68 

M7 
44 
146 

57 
1 66 

179 

57 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


TY>t,il>\ . 


8 


34 


142 


I 


78 


79 


1,603 





Total of killed and wounded, 474 ; Missing and captured, 155 ; Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 27. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Blackburn s Ford, Va 14 

First Bull Run, Va i 

Yorktown, Va 4 

Williamsburg, Va 12 

Oak Grove, Va 14 

Glendale, Va 20 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Manassas, Va 15 



BATTLES. K.AM.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 3 

Chancellorsville, Va 15 

Gettysburg, Pa 27 

Locust Grove, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 6 

Place Unknown 3 



Present, also, at Fair Oaks ; Kettle Run ; Chantilly ; Wapping Heights ; Kelly s Ford. 

NOTES. Organized at Boston in May, 1861, and left the State on June i5th. It was placed in Richardson s 
Brigade, Tyler s Division, in which command it fought at First Bull Run. In October it was transferred to 
Hooker s Division, and ordered on duty in Lower Maryland, where it remained until it moved to Yorktown. It 
served during 1862 in Grover s (ist) Brigade, Hooker s (2d) Division, Third Corps. In the affair on the picket 
line June 25, 1862 known as Oak Grove, it was prominently engaged, losing 9 killed and 55 wounded. At 
Glendale it lost 89 in killed and wounded, Major Charles P. Chandler being among the killed. At Chancellors 
ville, the regiment is credited with having fired the volley which cost the great Confederate leader, General Jack 
son, his life.* Its casualties in that battle were 9 killed, 46 wounded, and 40 missing. At Gettysburg, under 
Lt.-Colonel Baldwin, the regiment encountered its greatest loss, its casualties on that field amounting to 16 
killed, 83 wounded, and 21 missing. In March, 1864, the division was transferred, becoming the Fourth Division 
of the Second Corps, with General Gershom Mott in command. In this new command the regiment fought at 
the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, evincing the same heroic bearing which had helped on other fields to make the 
old Third Corps so illustrious. The order for muster-out came May 20, 1864, while the men were in line at 
Spotsylvania. The recruits and reenlisted men were tranferred to the Eleventh Massachusetts. 



* The Seventy-third New York claim that the fatal hot came from their ranks. 



156 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SECOND MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
RUGER S BRIGADE WILLIAMS S DIVISION TWELFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE II. GORDON ; TO. $., &. a., BVT. MAJOR-GEN. (2) COL. GEORGE L. ANDREWS ; OT. P., BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 

(3) COL. SAMUEL M. QUINCY ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. (4) COL. WILLIAM COGSWELL ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 

(5) COL. CHARLES F. MORSE. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISKASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


T 

O 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
2 




2 3 
I? 

25 

I? 

10 

8 

20 

IS 

27 
14 


3 
24 
18 
26 
18 
1 1 

9 

21 

16 

28 
16 


2 











I 

9 
IO 

IO 

8 

10 
10 

9 
1 1 

9 
9 


3 

9 

10 
10 

8 

10 
IO 

9 
1 1 

9 
9 


2 5 
182 

I 7 
!5 2 

i5 2 
181 

I5S 

193 

161 

167 

149 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


14 


I 7 6 


190 


2 


96 


98 


1,687 





Of the 1,019 originally enrolled, 133 were killed = 13.0 per cent. 

Of the 1,305 enrolled prior to the reenlistment, 187 were killed = 14.3 per cent. 

Total of killed and wounded, 657 ; Died in Confederate prisons (previously included). 15. 



BATTLES. K. &M. W. 

Winchester, Va 16 

Cedar Mountain, Va 56 

Antietam, Md 20 

Chancellorsville, Va 31 

Beverly Ford, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 45 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Elk River, Tenn i 

Resaca, Ga 5 

Kenesaw Mountain, Ga i 

Siege of Atlanta, Ga 5 

Averasboro, N. C 8 

Place Unknown i 



Present, also, at Front Royal ; Manassas ; Cassville ; New Hope Church ; Peach Tree Creek ; Siege of 
Savannah ; Bentonville ; March to the Sea ; The Carolinas. 



NOTES. The Second Massachusetts was the best officered regiment in the entire Army. Its colonel and 
lieutenant-colonel were educated at West Point, the latter graduating at the head of his class ; the line officers 
were selected men , for the most part collegians whose education, supplemented by the year of practical service 
in the field preliminary to the first battle, left nothing that could be desired to make them equal in every respect 
to any line of officers, regulars or volunteers. Of the sixteen officers who lost their lives, thirteen were Harvard 
men, whose names appear on the bronze tablets in Harvard Memorial Hall. The company officers were not 
elected by the men, as in other volunteer commands, but were selected by the authorities who raised the regiment. 
The enlisted men were also above the average in intelligence and soldierly bearing. The Second sustained the 
heaviest loss in action of any regiment in the corps. At Cedar Mouutain its casualties were 40 killed, 93 wounded, 
and 40 missing ; at Chancellorsville, 2 1 killed, no wounded, and 7 missing; and at Gettysburg, 23 killed, 109 
wounded, and 4 missing, out of 316 engaged. The latter loss occurred within a few minutes, in a hopeless assault 
made by the Second,and Twenty-seventh Indiana, which was ordered by a mistake ; the blunder was apparent to 
all, but no one faltered, and each soldier did his duty gallantly ; Lieutenant-Colonel Mudge, who was in command, 
remarked : " It is murder, but it s the order," and fell dead while waving his sword and cheering on his men. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



1.-.7 



NINTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
SWEITZER S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION -- FIFTH CORPS. 



(l)Coi.. THOMAS CASS (Killed). 



(2) COL. PATRICK It. (JU1NEY ; BVT. BRIO. OEM. 



COX TAXI KM. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IUSO.N. &<:. 


Total 
Enrollment. 

21 
I 7 8 

1 66 
1 66 
166 
1 60 
148 
172 

59 
162 

52 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 
2 

8 

2 

4 
6 
10 

9 

10 

8 
10 




Field and Staff 


I 



I 

2 

3 



i 

2 
I 

3 
I 




26 

22 

7 

9 

22 
12 
22 

U 

9 
22 


I 
26 

2 3 

1 9 
22 

22 

1.3 

24 
M 

22 
23 


2 






I 








8 

2 

4 
6 

9 

9 
10 

8 
10 






B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


*5 


194 


209 


3 


66 


69 


1,650 





209 killed 12.6 per cent. 

Of the 1,046 originally enrolled, 160 were killed -- 15.3 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 714; died in 
Confederate prisons (previously included), n. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Hanover Court House, Va 2 

Mechanicsville, Va 2 

Games Mill, Va 87 

Malvern Hill, Va 24 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 2 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Mine Run, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va ^4 

Spotsylvania, Va 34 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 3 

Picket Line, Va i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Manassas ; Antietam ; Shepherdstown Ford ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor. 



NOTES. An Irish regiment, whose gallant service on many fields attested the oft- acknowledged valor of the 
Irish soldier. Though organi/.ed in April, 1861, it did not reach Washington until June 29th. After a months 
stay in the vicinity of the Capitol, it crossed into Virginia and encamped on Arlington Heights, remaining there 
until March, 1862, when it went to the Peninsula. Its first battle occurred at Hanover Court House, although it 
participated in the Siege of Yorktown. It was assigned to Griffin s (21!) Brigade, Morell s (ist) Division, Fifth 
Corps, a division famous for the prominent part taken by it at Gaines s Mill and Malvern Hill. The Ninth dis 
tinguished itself at Gaines s Mill by the steadiness with which it sustained a heavy attack, its losses that day 
amounting to 57 killed, 149 wounded, and 25 missing; total, 231 ; six line officers were killed there, and four 
days later the Colonel fell, mortally wounded, at Malvern Hill. The regiment was engaged at Gettysburg as skir 
mishers, hence their slight loss in that battle. While on Grant s campaign, in 1864, the brigade was commanded 
by Colonel Sweitzer, and the division by General Griffin. The losses of the regiment at the Wilderness were 26 
killed, 108 wounded, and 3 missing; and at Spotsylvania, 25 killed, 71 wounded, and 9 missing. During the 
entire period of its active service it was in the Second Brigade, First Division, Fifth Corps. It was relieved 
from duty June 10, 1864, and ordered home for muster-out. 



158 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
EUSTIS S BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY S. BRIGGS; BUIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. HENRY L. EUSTIS ; BUIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. JOSEPH B. PARSONS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 

* 

2 
I 





I 

2 
2 




1 

8 

10 

9 

M 

10 

10 

9 

22 

16 

15 


3 

8 

12 
IO 

M 
10 

10 
10 

24 

18 
15 





I 





* 





I 

4 
5 
7 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 

9 

7 


I 

4 
6 

7 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 

9 

7 


16 
118 
II I 

128 

"5 

I I 2 
I 2O 
122 
140 
12 7 
109 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E 


F . 


G. 


H. 


T . 


K. 


Totals 


ro 


124 


34 


I 


55 


56 


1,218 





134 killed = 1 1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 503. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Fair Oaks, Va 39 

Guerillas, Va., June 19, 1 862 i 

Malvern Hill, Va 13 

Fredericksburg, Va. ( 1863) 16 

Gettysburg, Pa i 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Rappahannock Station, Va 3 

Wilderness, Va 30 

Spotsylvania, Va 26 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Williamsburg ; Seven Days Battle ; Antietam ; Fredericksburg (1862); Salem 
Heights ; Mine Run. 



NOTES. Recruited in Western Massachusetts. Arrived at Washington July 28, 1861, and remained in its 
vicinity until the army moved to the Peninsula, in March, 1862. It was assigned to Devens s (3d) Brigade, 
Couch s (ist) Division, Fourth Corps. Under command of Colonel Briggs it distinguished itself at Fair Oaks, 
the Colonel being wounded, and the casualties amounting to 27 killed, 95 wounded, and 2 missing. Major Ozro 
Miller, a gallant officer, succeeded to the command, but fell, mortally wounded, soon after at Malvern Hill. Col 
onel Eustis was in command at Second Fredericksburg and Salem Heights, in which the casualties amounted to 
to killed, 57 wounded, and 2 missing. The brigade had been previously transferred to Newton s (3d) Division, 
Sixth Corps. The brigade took the field in May, 1864, under command of General Eustis, as the Fourth Brigade 
of Getty s (2d) Division, Sixth Corps. Colonel Parsons led the regiment in the battles of Grant s campaigns, its 
losses at the Wilderness amounting to 21 killed, 105 wounded, and 2 missing, over one-third of those engaged. 
A still heavier percentage of loss occurred in the various actions about Spotsylvania (15 killed, 64 wounded, and 
13 missing), Major Dexter F. Parker being mortally wounded there. The action of May i2th, at Spotsylvania, was 
the closest and deadliest of any in which the Tenth had been engaged. On June 20, 1864, while in the trenches 
before Petersburg, the regiment received the orders to return home for muster-out ; one of the officers was killed 
just before the regiment left its position to go home. 



TllKKK HfNDRKD FkHITINt; I i I . . I MKNTS. 



159 



ELEVENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
CARR S BRIGADE -- HUMPHREYS S DIVISION --THIRD CORPS. 



(DCoL GEORGE CLARKE. (2) COL WILLIAM BLAISDELL; BVT. BRIO. GEN. (Killed). (3) THOMAS H. DURHAM ; BVT. BKIO. GEN. 



( ..Ml-VMI - 


Kll.l.l li AND Iln.n OP \\ .11 M> 


DIEII OP DISEASE, ACCIDENT*. IN PHISON, Ac. 


ToUil 
Enrollment 


Officer*. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


M, 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
2 



2 




1 
2 




2 




3 

21 

13 

I 1 

3 

9 
1 1 

18 

10 

24 


2 

S 

21 

S 

I I 

3 
20 

U 
18 

10 
26 


I 







1 




I 

9 

7 

9 
8 

13 

7 
6 

16 

5 
M 


2 

9 

7 

9 
8 

3 

7 
6 

16 
6 
H 


9 
165 

222 
198 
199 
221 
249 

139 

95 

129 

196 




B 


c . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


II 


J 53 


164 


2 


95 


97 


.93 2 





Original enrollment, 990; killed. 122 ; percentage. 12.0. 
Total killed and wounded. 566; Died in Confederate prisons (previously included). 30 



BATTI.IS. K.&M.W. 

First Bull Run, Va 15 

Williamsburg, Va 15 

Oak Grove, Va 2 

Glcndale, Va i 

Malvern Hill, Va., Aug. 5, 1862 2 

Manassas, Va 28 

Chanccllorsville, Va 15 

Gettysburg, Va 37 

Mine Run, Va 6 



BATTLES. K.AM.W. 

Wilderness, Va 1 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 9 

North Anna, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va 

Petersburg, Va 

Peebles Farm, Va 

Boydton Road, Va 

Hatcher s Run, Va 



i 

2 

s 



5 
3 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Fair Oaks ; Savage Station; Hristoe Station (1862) ; Chantilly ; Fredericksburg ; 
Totopotomoy ; Farmville ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Eleventh left the State June 24, 1861, and in less than a month was engaged at First Bull Run ; 
its loss, as then officially reported, was 8 killed, 40 wounded, and 40 missing. In the campaigns of 1862, it 
served in Grover s (ist) Brigade, Hooker s (2d) Division, Third Corps. At Williamsburg it lost 7 killed, 59 
wounded, and i missing ; at Manassas, 9 killed, 79 wounded, and 25 missing ; at Gettysburg, 23 killed, 96 
wounded, and 10 missing fully half of those engaged. Lt. -Col. George P. Tilcston was killed at Manassas, 
and Colonel Blaisdtll fell at Petersburg, June 23, 1864, while in command of a brigade. At Gettysburg, the 
division was commanded by Humphreys, the brigade by Carr (J. B.), and the regiment by Lt.-Col. Porter 
D. Tripp , the command fighting on the Emmettsburg Road. The Eleventh was transferred in March, 1864,10 
Brewster s (2d) Brigade, Mott s (4th) Division, Second Corps, in which it fought at the Wilderness, where it 
lost 9 killed, 54 wounded, and 12 missing. Its term of service expired on June 12, 1864, when the original 
members were mustered out. The recruits and reenlisted veterans left in the field were formed into a battalion 
of five companies, designated the Eleventh Battalion, which vas subsequently increased by two companies of 
similar material left by the Sixteenth Massachusetts. 



100 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWELFTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
BAXTER S BRIGADE ROBINSON S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. FLETCHER WEBSTER (Killed). 



(2) COL. JAMES L BATES. 



COSIPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men . 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 

3 
i 

i 

2 



I 

2 
2 
2 




* 

2 I 
21 

15 
16 

24 
7 

9 
ii 

18 

*3 


4 
24 

22 

16 
18 
24 
18 

21 

13 
2O 

13 












* 




ii 

8 
1 1 
6 

4 
10 
6 
1 1 

8 
8 




1 1 

8 
1 1 
6 

4 
10 

6 
ii 

8 
8 


T 7 

T 59 
136 

159 

141 

132 

58 
146 

57 
5 
i59 




B 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


18 


75 


*93 





83 


83 


i,5 22 





193 killed = 12.6 per cent. 
Original enrollment, 1,040 ; killed, 152; percentage, 14.6. Total loss in killed and wounded, 667 ; Died of disease 



in Confederate prisons, 33. 

BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Cedar Mountain, Va 2 

Thoroughfare Gap, Va i 

Manassas, Va 22 

South Mountain, Va i 

Antietam, Md 74 

Fredericksburg, Va 24 

Gettysburg, Pa 12 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Funkstown, Md i 

Wilderness, Va 21 

Spotsylvania, Va 20 

North Anna, Va 5 

Bethesda Church, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va 7 



Present, also, at Chancellorsville ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor. 

NOTES. The regiment left Boston July 23, 1861. It was stationed on the Maryland side of the Upper 
Potomac, and made its winter-quarters at Frederick, Md. It commenced active service in April, 1862, in the 
Shenandoah Valley, then in Hartsuff s (3d) Brigade, Ricketts s (2d) Division, McDowell s Corps. While in this 
command it was engaged at Manassas, where its losses amounted to 13 killed, 61 wounded, and 63 missing; 
Colonel Webster, a son of Daniel Webster, was killed there. The regiment faced a terrible fire at Antietam, 
losing 49 killed, 165 wounded, and 10 missing, out of 334 present on the field; Major Elisha Burbank was 
mortally wounded in that battle. At Fredericksburg, the regiment was in Lyle s (2d) Brigade, Gibbon s (2d) 
Division, First Corps ; its casualties in that fight were 14 killed, 86 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 258 engaged. 
General Baxter commanded the brigade at Gettysburg, and Robinson the division the regiment losing there 5 
killed, 52 wounded, and 62 missing, out of about 200 in line. The division was transferred, in 1864, to the Fifth 
Corps. At the Wilderness, Lieutenant-Colonel David Allen, Jr., was killed, the loss of the Twelfth amounting to 
14 killed, 48 wounded, and 8 missing. Its losses in 1864, from May 5th to June 25th when it was mustered 
out-- were 42 killed, 124 wounded, and 10 missing. It left the front June 25, 1864 ; the recruits and reenlisted 
men remaining in the field were transferred to the Thirty- ninth Massachusetts. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



161 



FIFTEENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
HARROW S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(I) COL. CHARLES DEVENS ; BVT. MAJOB-GEN. 



(2) COL. GEORGE II. WARD; BVT. Bum. GEN. (Klllwl). 
(3) COL. GEORGE C. JOSLIN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOI-NDS. 


DIED or 1 >i->: VM . ACCIDENT*, IN PHISON, 8t< 


Total 
Enrollment, 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Mi u. 


Total. 


Field ind Staff. . 


3 

3 

2 
I 
2 



* 

I 
I 
I 




IO 

16 

3 1 
20 

18 

23 
26 

23 
33 

27 


3 
*3 

18 

32 

22 

18 

23 
26 

24 

34 
28 








I 







9 
9 
9 
16 

9 
6 

19 
20 

5 
9 




9 
9 

9 
16 

10 
6 

19 

20 

i5 
9 


7 
167 

63 
74 

187 

57 
1 66 

168 
167 
77 
158 


fnrnnnnv A . 


B 


c, 


D. 


E 


F. 


G. 




I 


K 


Totals . 


4 


227 


241 


I 


121 


I 22 


1,701 





241 killed 14.1 per cent. 

Original enrollment, 1011 ; killed, 171 ; percentage, 16.9. Total of killed and wounded, 879. Died of disease in Con 
federate prisons (previously included), 32. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Ball s Bluff, Va 44 

Fair Oaks, Va i o 

Antietam, Md* 9 8 

Fredericksburg. Ya 5 

Gettysburg, Pa 38 

Bristoe Station, Va 4 



BATTLES. K. &M.\V. 

Mine Run, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va i o 

Spotsylvania, Va 14 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 5 

Petersburg, Va 8 



Present, also, at Yorktown; West Point; Peach Orchard; Savage Station; Glendale ; Malvcrn Hill; 
Vienna; Fredericksburg (1863); Po River; North Anna. 



NOTES. At Antietam the Fifteenth sustained one of the most remarkable losses of the war. It was then 
in Gorman s Brigade, Sedgwick s Division, and was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Kimball. It carried into 
this action 606 officers and men, of whom 318 were killed or wounded. The killed ami mortally wounded num 
bered 1 08, including a company of the Andrew Sharpshooters, which had been permanently attached to the 
Fifteenth while at Yorktown, making eleven companies. At Gettysburg the number engaged was 239, officers 
and men, of whom 148 were killed or wounded a loss of over sixty per cent. Colonel Ward, who had lost a 
leg at Ball s Bluff, was killed in this action. 

The Fifteenth served in the First Brigade, Second Division ; General Harrow commanded the brigade at 
Gettysburg and General Webb at the Wilderness. "Entering the latter campaign with 275 men, it lost, prior to 
its muster-out, 14 killed, 58 wounded, and 4 missing ; not including 67, who were missing or captured at Peters 
burg. The Fifteenth was raised in Worcester County. It left Worcester August 8, 1861, and returned July 14, 
1864, when it was mustered out, its three years term of service having expired. Its return to Worcester was 
marked by a grand and memorable ovation on the part of the citizens and State authorities. 



11 



Not including the company of sharpshooters attached. 



162 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTEENTH MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 
CARE S BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. POWELL T. WYMAN ; 



. (Killed). 



(2) COL. THOMAS R. TANNATT ; 



(3) COL. GARDNER BANKS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 
I 
I 
I 

2 
2 

2 

I 

3 




7 
M 
13 

13 

18 

i? 
15 

12 

J 5 

IO 


3 
8 

J 5 
i4 

i5 

20 

J 9 
16 

i5 

J 5 

IO 


I 





I 




5 
5 
4 

5 
18 

7 
iQ 
9 

I T 
IO 




5 
5 
5 

5 
18 

7 
19 
9 

12 
IO 


16 
130 

i37 

128 

128 

J 39 

135 

127 

123 
136 
136 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


16 


J 34 


5 


2 


93 


95 


i335 





150 killed 11.2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 543 ; Loss by disease includes 30 deaths in Confederate prisons. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Williamsburg Road, Va., June 18, 1862 29 

Oak Grove, Va., June 25, 1862 4 

Glendale, Va 7 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Manassas, Va 31 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 19 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Gettysburg, Pa 23 

Locust Grove, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 10 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Petersburg, Va 6 

Picket Line i 



Present, also, at Chantilly ; Wapping Heights ; North Anna ; Cold Harbor. 



NOTES. Recruited mostly in Middlesex County. The colonelcy was tendered to Powell T. Wyman, a grad 
uate of West Point, who was in Europe when the war broke out, but returned and offered his services to his State. 
The regiment left Massachusetts August 17, 1861, and proceeded to Old Point Comfort, Va., where it encamped 
for the winter. In May, 1862, it went to Suffolk, and in June joined McClellan s army, then before Richmond, 
when it was assigned to Grover s (ist) Brigade, Hooker s (ad) Division, Third Corps. Within a few days after 
its arrival there, the regiment was ordered to develop the enemy s position in the woods on the Williamsburg 
Road June 18, 1862 in which affair the Sixteenth established a reputation for efficiency under fire ; its loss 
in that fight was 17 killed, 30 wounded, and 14 missing; the latter were killed or wounded. Colonel Wyman 
was killed a few days after, at Glendale. Major Gardner Banks commanded the Sixteenth at Manassas, and in 
the preliminary action at Kettle Run; in these actions the regiment lost 19 killed, 64 wounded, and 27 missing. 
At Chancellorsville the losses were 6 killed, 59 wounded, and 8 missing; at Gettysburg, 15 killed, 53 wounded, 
and 13 missing. In 1864, the division was transferred to the Second Corps, in which command it fought in the 
Wilderness campaign. Lieutenant-Colonel Waldo Merriam, who commanded the regiment, was killed at Spot 
sylvania. The Sixteenth was discharged July n, 1864, and the recruits and reenlisted men remaining in the 
field were transferred to the Eleventh Massachusetts. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



NINETEENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
HALL S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(DCou EDWARD W. IIINKS; BVT. MAJ.-OEN. 
(3) COL. ANSEL U. WASS. 



(3) COL. AKTIIfK F. DKVEHErX 

(4) Coi.. EDMUND KICE. 



HVT. Bnio. GKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIKD or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IUSON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
2 



I 



I 

2 

3 

i 



2 


I 

5 
20 

3 
9 

21 
12 

16 

20 

8 

12 


3 
7 
2O 

4 
9 

22 

4 
9 

21 

8 
4 
















2 

>5 
12 

17 

3 

14 

IO 

3 
18 

10 

9 


2 

5 
12 

1? 

3 
14 

IO 

3 
18 

IO 

9 


20 

85 
1 88 

77 
33 

79 
181 

192 

268 

47 
65 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


4 


47 


161 


133 


33 


,835 





Original enrollment, 1,050; killed, 131 ; percentage, 12.4. 

Total of killed and wounded, 583 ; Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 64. 

K.&M.W. BATTLES. 



BATTLES. 

Yorktown, Va i 

Oak Grove, Va 1 3 

Glendale, Va 33 

Malvern Hill, Va 

Fairfax C. H., Va i 

Antietam, Md 25 

Fredericksburg, Va 29 

Gettysburg, Pa 17 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Robertson s Tavern, Va i 



K.&M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 

North Anna, Va 2 

Totopotomoyj Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22 i 

Petersburg, Va 2 

Deep Bottom, Va 3 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va 4 

Fall of Petersburg, Va i 



Wilderness, Va 4 

Present, also, at Ball s Bluff; West Point ; Fair Oaks ; Peach Orchard ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; 
Fredericksburg (1863) ; Ream s Station ; Farmville ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Lynnfield, Mass., and arrived at Washington August 30, 1861. It was stationed in 
Maryland, along the Upper Potomac, until March, 1862, when it was assigned to Dana s (3d) Brigade, Sedgwick s 
(2d) Division, Second Corps, with which command it then moved to the Peninsula. It was hotly engaged at 
Glendale, its losses there and at Malvern Hill, amounting to 19 killed, 84 wounded, and 42 missing. At Glendale, 
Colonel Minks was wounded, and Major Henry J. Howe was killed. The regiment was engaged at Antietam, in 
Sedgwick s contest in the woods around the Dunker Church, losing there 8 killed, 108 wounded, and 30 missing ; 
Colonel Hinks was again severely wounded. The loss at Fredericksburg was 14 killed, 83 wounded, and 8 
missing. In this engagement, the Nineteenth under Captain Weymouth crossed the river in boats, together 
with the Seventh Michigan, acting as a forlorn hope. The boats crossed in the face of the enemy s fire from the 
opposite bank, which had hitherto prevented the laying of the pontoons. The Nineteenth, under Colonel 
Devereux, distinguished itself at Gettysburg, winning especial mention in the histories of that battle; its casualties 
there were 9 killed, 61 wounded, and 7 missing, out of 141 engaged. During the Wilderness campaign it was in 
Webb s (ist) Brigade, Gibbon s (2d) Division, and fought in all the subsequent battles of the Second Corps. 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTIETH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
HALL S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM R. LEE ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 

(2) COL. FRANCIS W. PALFREY ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. PAUL REVERE (Killed) ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 

(4) COL. GEORGE N. MACY ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


6 




2 



3 

2 



2 
I 
I 


27 
12 

17 
32 

*9 
28 

21 
2 9 

36 
22 


6 

27 

12 
19 

3 2 

22 

30 
21 

3 1 

37 
2 3 









I 







2 3 
13 

16 
6 
18 

7 

2 3 
10 

J 7 

i5 




23 

J 3 
16 
6 

18 
8 

2 3 

10 

17 
IS 


2 4 
248 
229 

J 37 
217 

118 

238 

59 

218 

232 
58 




B. 


C. 


D., 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


17 


M3 


260 


I 


148 


149 


1,978 





260 killed == 13.1 percent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 944; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 63. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Ball s Bluff, Va 38 

Fair Oaks, Va 5 

Savage Station, Va i 

Glendale, Va 8 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Antietam, Md 20 

Fredericksburg, Va 48 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 44 

Bristoe Station, Va i 



K.&M.W. 

... 36 

5 

. . . 20 



BATTLES. 

Wilderness, Va 

Po River, Va 

Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 12 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 12 

Deep Bottom, Va 2 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va i 

Guerillas, Va i 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; West Point ; Peach Orchard ; Malvern Hill ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; 
Strawberry Plains ; Ream s Station ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. General Humphreys- Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac in his able history, The 
Virginia Campaign of 1864 and 1865, alludes to the Twentieth as "one of the very best regiments in the ser 
vice." It served on the Peninsula, and at Antietam, in Dana s (3d) Brigade, Sedgwick s (2d) Division. At 
Fredericksburg, the brigade, under Colonel Norman Hall of the Seventh Michigan, distinguished itself by cross 
ing the river in the face of the enemy s riflemen, who occupied the buildings on the opposite bank. To the 
Twentieth was assigned the bloody task of clearing the streets ; in column of companies, led by Macy, it fought 
its way through the main street of the city exposed to a terrible fire from the windows and housetops ; its casual 
ties in this fight were 25 killed and 138 wounded ; no missing. At Gettysburg, it lost 30 killed, 94 wounded, and 
3 missing; total, 127, out of 12 officers and 218 men who went into that action. The Twentieth sustained the 
greatest loss in battle of any Massachusetts regiment ; also, a remarkable fatality in its Field and Staff, losing a 
Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, two Majors, an Adjutant, and a Surgeon, killed in battle. Colonel Revere was mor 
tally wounded at Gettysburg ; Lieutenant-Colonel Ferdinand Dreher received a fatal wound at Fredericksburg ; 
Major Henry L. Abbott was killed at the Wilderness ; Major Henry L. Patton died of wounds received at 
Deep Bottom ; and Surgeon Edward I. Revere was killed at Antietam while in the discharge of his duties. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



105 



TWENTY-FIRST MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
LEASURE S BRIGADE STEVENSON S DIVISION -- NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. Al ursTVS MOUSE. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM S. OLAHK. 



(8) COL. (JEOUOE P. I1AWKES ; BVT. Biiio. OKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KlI.LKD AND DlKI) OK Wot Nlm. 


DIED or DISKASK, ACCIIHCNTH, IN I KIHON, &i\ 


Total 
Enrollment 


< >ftVers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 




I 
2 
I 




I 

2 
2 




M 
17 
9 
5 
13 
10 

16 
1 1 

I? 
16 


2 
14 

I/ 
20 

17 
M 
IO 

16 

12 

*9 
1 8 








I 

I 







7 
9 
4 

5 
1 1 

9 
9 

1C) 
IO 

5 




7 
9 
4 
5 

I 2 
10 

9 

IO 
IO 

5 


16 
119 

"3 
"5 

102 

I2 5 

5 
1 20 

I IO 

1 20 
!33 

i,. 78 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


I I 


148 


59 


2 


89 


9 





159 killed 13.4 per cent. 

Total of killed and wounded, 560; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 6. 
BATTLES. K. AM.\V. BATTI.I - 

Roanoke Island, N. C 13 

New Berne, N. C 23 

Camden, N. C 4 

Chantilly, Va 38 

Antietam, Md i o 

Fredericksburg, Va 13 

Knoxville, Tenn 4 

Wilderness, Va 3 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 4 

Present, also, at Manassas ; South Mountain ; Blue Springs ; Campbell s Station ; Cold Harbor ; North Anna. 



K.&M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18 i 

Shady Grove Road, Va 3 

Bethesda Church, Va 13 

Petersburg, Assault, June 17 6 

Petersburg Mine, Va 7 

Siege of Petersburg 10 

Weldon Railroad, Va 3 

Poplar Grove Church, Va 4 



NOTES. Composed mainly of Worcester county men. It left the State August 23, 1861, and was stationed 
at Annapolis until January 6, 1862, when it sailed with the Burnside expedition to North Carolina, having been 
brigaded in General Reno s command. Under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Alberto C. Maggi, it was promi 
nently engaged at Roanoke Island, where its casualties were 5 killed and 39 wounded. In the following month, 
commanded by Colonel Clarke, it fought gallantly at New Berne, where it suffered a loss of 15 killed and 42 
wounded; among the killed was Adjutant Stearns. At Chantilly in Ferrero s Brigade, Reno s Division - 
the regiment encountered the hardest fighting in its experience ; Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph P. Rice was killed, 
and the total of casualties amounted to 22 killed, 98 wounded, and 26 captured, out of less than 400 men 
present in action. At Fredericksburg Ferrero s (20!) Brigade, Sturgis s (2d) Division the regiment rendered 
efficient service by the skill with which, from an advanced position and good marksmanship, it kept down the 
enemy s fire. In this action two color bearers were killed, and others were wounded, one of the latter losing 
both arms. Leasure s Brigade distinguished itself particularly in the battle of the Wilderness, where it swept 
down the line, across and opposite Hancock s front ; it was a daring charge, and accomplished with a remarkably 
small loss. The Twenty-first was mustered out in October, 1864; the men remaining in the field were trans 
ferred to the Thirty-sixth Massachusetts. 



166 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTY-SECOND MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
SWEITZER S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY WILSON. 

(2) COL. JESSE A. GOVE ; 



. (Killed). 



(3) COL. CHARLES E. GRISWOLD. 

(4) COL. WILLIAM S. TILTON ; BVT. Bmc. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 




KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
2 
I 



I 



I 
I 

2 







3 
18 

15 

24 

22 
20 

J 7 
T 9 

20 

22 


I 

3 2 
J 9 
15 

2 5 

22 
21 

18 

21 
2O 

22 







* 

I 




I 

8 

9 
1 1 

6 
T 3 

10 
10 

M 

12 

8 


I 
8 

9 
II 

6 

J 3 
10 

10 

14 

T 3 

8 


T 3 
136 

138 
144 

135 

136 

13* 

J 35 

T 5 
144 

13 


f~!nrnranv A . 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


T 


K 


Totals 


9 


2Oy 


216 


I 


IO2 


103 


i,393 





216 killed = 15. 5 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 759 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 16. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W, 

Siege of Yorktown, Va 2 

Mechanicsville, Va 4 

Gaines s Mill, Va 84 

Malvern Hill, Va 14 

Shepherdstown, Va i 

Fredericksburg, Va 7 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 13 

Rappahannock Station, Va i 



37 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 17 

Laurel Hill, Va \ 
Spotsylvania, Va ) 

North Anna, Va 5 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 

Bethesda Church, Va 1 1 

Petersburg, Assault 9 

Picket Line i 

Siege of Petersburg -6 



Present, also, at Hanover C. H. ; Manassas ; Antietam ; Mine Run ; Cold Harbor. 

NOTES. Organized at Lynnfield by the efforts of the Hon. Henry Wilson, who afterwards became vice-presi 
dent of the United States. The regiment arrived at Hall s Hill, Va., on October 13, 1861, and, encamping there, 
was engaged in perfecting its drill and discipline until March, 1862, when it commenced active service in the 
Peninsular Army. It served there in Martindale s (ist) Brigade, Morell s (ist) Division, Fitz John Porter s 
Corps. It was engaged in Porter s great battle at Gaines s Mill, where it was one of the last to yield its ground, 
holding its position so long that it lost several prisoners thereby. Its casualties at Gaines s Mill were 58 killed, 
1 08 wounded, and 117 captured or missing; many of the latter were either killed or wounded. Colonel Gove, 
who commanded the Twenty-second in that battle, was killed, and Major Tilton was wounded and captured. 
More hard fighting followed immediately, at Malvern Hill, swelling its losses in the Seven Days Battle to 69 killed, 
153 wounded, and 124 missing; total, 346. At Gettysburg, General Barnes commanded the division, Colonel 
Tilton, the brigade, and Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Sherwin, the regiment ; its casualties on that field were 8 
killed, 2 7 wounded, and i missing, The regiment went into winter-quarters near Bealton, Va., building in addition 
to their huts, a neat chapel which was used by the men as a church and as a Lyceum ; it was also used as a lodge 
room by Warren Army Lodge, No. i, F. A. M. The Twenty-second, though small in numbers, sustained a heavy 
percentage of loss at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, losing 121 in killed and wounded nearly half its strength. 






THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



TWENTY-FIFTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
HECKMAN S BRIGADE -- WEITZEL S DIVISION -- EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWARD UPTON. 



(2) COL. JOSIAH 1 ICKKTT: BYT. Hum. GEX. 



(8) COL. JAMES TUCKER. 



COMPANIES. 


Kil 1 1 n AM) DlKD OP Woi SIW. 


DIED op DIXEAME, Arcmr.NTH, IN I RIHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 



I 




2 
I 

I 

I 






1 1 
16 

2 3 
ii 

i? 

12 

18 
16 

4 
16 


I 
I I 

1? 

23 
1 1 

9 
3 

1 9 
16 

15 
16 















I 
12 

18 

3 
18 

21 

16 

T 3 
18 

24 
15 


I 
12 

18 

3 
18 

21 

16 

13 
18 

24 

5 


19 

35 
124 

49 
1 68 

53 
127 

121 
132 
124 
II 9 


Company A 


B 


c 


D . 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


7 


*54 


161* 





169 


169 


.371 





161 killed 11.7 percent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 564; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 61. 



BATTLES. K. &M.\V. 

Roanoke Island, N. C 1 1 

New Berne, N. C 5 

Goldsboro, N. C 2 

Walthal Junction, Va 5 

Arrow-field Church, Va 18 

Proctor s Creek, Va 2 



BATTLES. K.AM.W. 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 21 

Cold Harbor, Vaf 74 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 1 1 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 1 1 

Picket, N. C. (1862) i 



Present, also, at Kinston, N. C. ; Whitehall, N. C. ; Wise s Forks, N. C. 



NOTES. Recruited in Worcester county, and left the State November i , 1 86 1 . It went to Annapolis, and 
thence with the Burnside expedition to North Carolina, arriving at Hatteras Inlet on February 6, 1862. It was 
in Foster s (ist) Brigade, and was engaged at Roanoke Island with a loss of 6 killed and 44 wounded. It 
remained in North Carolina in the Eighteenth Corps until October, 1863, when it moved into South 
eastern Virginia. In the meantime, 432 of the men reenlisted, and in February, 1864, the regiment returned to 
Massachusetts on a veteran furlough. In April, 1864, the corps joined the Army of the James, and on May 51)1 
landed at Bermuda Hundred. Fighting soon commenced, and on May gth, at Arrowfield Church, the regiment 
lost 1 6 killed, 60 wounded, and 69 captured or missing. At Cold Harbor it sustained its heaviest loss, its casual 
ties amounting to 24 killed, 142 wounded, and 49 missing, a total of 215 out of 300 reported for duty that 
morning ; six of the officers lost their lives in that action, and the missing ones were nearly all killed or wounded. 
The brigade was withdrawn in September, 1864, from its position in the Petersburg Trenches, and ordered to 
New Berne, N. C., on garrison duty. It was mustered out October 20, 1864, and the men remaining in the field 
were consolidated into a battalion of four companies, which served in North Carolina until the close of the war. 



One authority states the loss as 106 killed and Gl died of wounds; total l(i. 
mortally wounded. 



reports (unofficial; aySJ; 52 killed, 30 



168 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 



HECKMAN S BRIGADE WEITZEL S DIVISION EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HORACE C. LEE ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. 



(2) COL. WALTER G. BARTHOLOMEW. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

* 


I 



I 



T 

3 
i 




9 
10 

10 

20 

15 
3 
6 
ii 

4 
J 3 


2 

9 

10 
10 
21 

15 

3 1 
6 

12 

7 
M 


I 



I 







I 


I 

36 
29 

44 
2 3 
M 

T 3 

20 

24 
37 

20 


2 
36 

3 
44 
2 3 
H 
J 3 

20 

24 
38 
2O 


2 5 
131 
156 
197 

155 
133 

155 
123 

129 
>58 
147 


f^nmnanv A . 


B 


c 


D. 


E 


F 


G 


H. 


I . .*. . 


K 


Totals 


9 


128 


137 


3 


26l 


264 


J o9 





Total of killed and wounded, 487. 
Deaths in Confederate prisons, 116. 



BATTLES. K.&M. W. 

Roanoke Island, N.C 5 

New Berne, N.C 15 

Guerillas, N. C., Nov. 7, 1862 i 

Goldsboro, N.C i 

Winfield, N. C 2 

Washington, N.C 2 

Gum Swamp, N.C 3 

Port Walthall, Va 2 

Arrowfield Church, Va., 7 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 22 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 2 5 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3 24 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 22 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 12 

Foster Bridge, N.C i 

South West Creek, N.C 8 

Picket duty 2 



NOTES. Recruited in the western part of the State, and arrived at Annapolis, Md., on Novemoer 5, 1861. 
It remained there undergoing instructions and drill for two months, and then sailed for North Carolina. It was 
assigned to Foster s (ist) Brigade, and fought under Burnside at Roanoke Island and New Berne, its casualties 
in the latter action amounting to 9 killed and 43 wounded. The regiment remained in North Carolina during 
the next two years. Colonel Lee was in command of the brigade most of the time, leaving the regiment to the 
command of Lieutenant-Colonel Luke Lyman. During its stay in North Carolina it was engaged with credit in 
numerous minor battles and skirmishes. In April, 1864, it joined the Army of the James in its advance on 
Richmond. At the battle of Drewry s Bluff the regiment was surrounded while fighting in a dense fog, losing in 
addition to its killed and wounded, 252 of its number taken prisoners. Among the captured were the Colonel, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, and General Heckman. Part of the regiment escaping, the command devolved upon Major 
William A. Walker, who was killed soon after at Cold Harbor. On that bloody field the remnant of the Twenty- 
seventh lost 22 killed, 68 wounded, and 4 missing. In the assault on Petersburg, June 15, 1864, it sustained a 
further loss of 13 killed, and 30 wounded. In August, 1864, the regiment returned to North Carolina where it 
served until mustered out in June, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



icu 



TWENTY-EIGHTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
IRISH BRIGADE -HANCOCK S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(l)Coi.. WILLIAM MOXTIETII. 

(2) COL. KIC11AKD BYRNES; li.fl. (Killed*. 



: "i .I OI{(;| \\ . M : , \\ RIGHT. 
(4) Coi.. JAMKS FLK.MIN(J. 



COM PA NIKS. 


KILLED AND DIKII or WOUNDS. 


DIED p DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKICON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Mon. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

3 



i 



i 
i 
i 
i 

2 

3 




32 

2 3 
4i 

27 

7 
20 

20 

19 
18 

18 


2 

35 
2 3 
42 

2 7 
18 

21 
21 
2O 
2O 
21 







I 







I 
21 
16 

J 3 
7 
10 

U 
M 
9 
M 

8 


I 
21 

16 

13 

18 

IO 

3 
M 
9 
M 

8 


18 
227 

255 
223 

2I 3 

218 

34 

122 
I 06 

34 
128 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 




S 


235 


250 


I 


136 


i37 


i,778 





250 killed = 14 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 847 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons, 51. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

James Island, S. C 20 

Manassas, Va 26 

Chantilly, Va 21 

South Mountain, Md i 

Antietam, Md 26 

Fredericksburg, Va 36 

Gettysburg, Pa 15 

Auburn, Va i 

Picket, Va.. Dec. 3, 1863 i 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 26 

Spotsylvania, Va 30 

Totopotomoy, Va j 

Cold Harbor, Va . i o 

Petersburg, Va 6 

Strawberry Plains, Va 2 

Deep Bottom, Va 6 

Ream s Station, Va 2 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 17 



Present, also, at Chancellorsville ; Bristoe Station; Mine Run; North Anna; Sutherland Station; Sailor s 
Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Composed mostly of men of Irish birth. It was organized at Boston, and left the State January 
u, 1862. Proceeding soon after to Hilton Head, S. C., it remained in that Department until August, when it 
sailed for Virginia ; it was then in Stevens s Division, Ninth Corps, in which command it fought at Manassas and 
Chantilly. In these engagements, under command of Major Cartwright, its casualties amounted to 33 killed, 
188 wounded, and 13 missing; total, 234. At Antietam then in VVillcox s Division the regiment numbered 
less than 200 in line, but it lost in that battle, 12 killed and 36 wounded. It was transferred, in November, 1862, 
to Hancock s (ist) Division, Second Corps, in which division it afterwards remained. It was placed in the Irish 
Brigade, and charged with it at Fredericksburg, losing 14 killed, 124 wounded, and 20 missing, out of 416 
engaged. In May, 1864, it crossed the Rapidan with 505 officers and men General Barlow in command of 
the division. At the Wilderness the regiment lost 15 killed, 86 wounded, and 14 missing. At Spotsylvania its 
losses were 23 killed, 79 wounded, and 8 missing; half its losses there occurred in the affair of May j8th, in 
which Major Andrew J. Lawlor was killed. Colonel Byrnes, an able and gallant officer, fell at Cold Harbor. The 
regiment was mustered out December 13, 1864; the recruits and reenlisted men remaining in the field were 
consolidated into a battalion of five companies which served through the rest of the war. 



170 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRTY-SECOND MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
SWEITZER S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. FRANCIS J. PARKER. 



(2) COL. GEORGE L. PRESCOTT (Killed); BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. JOSEPH C. EDMONDS ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
2 



I 




I 


* 






I 
*3 

X 3 
13 

10 

16 
ii 

19 

10 

M 
16 
i 

2 


2 

15 
13 

M 
IO 

16 

12 

19 

IO 

M 

16 

i 

2 




I 



1 







* 



I 

18 

10 

6 

T 3 

18 

12 

M 

M 

18 

12 

2 

5 


I 

T 9 

10 

7 

*3 

18 

12 

M 
14 

18 

12 

2 

5 


18 
232 
229 
219 
213 
208 
204 

222 
211 
207 
203 

!3 J 
121 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


5 


T 39 


144 


2 


143 


MS 


2,418 





Total of killed and wounded, 516 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 24. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Fredericksburg, Va 6 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 22 

Wilderness, Va 7 

Spotsylvania, Va 46 

Totopotomoy, Va 8 

Bethesda Church, Va 15 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Petersburg Va. (assault), June 17, 1864 10 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 7 

Jerusalem Road, Va 4 

Weldon Railroad, Va 3 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 5 

Hatcher s Run, Va 9 

Boydton Road, Va i 



Present, also, at Manassas ; Antietam ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Boydton Road 
(1864); Gravelly Run; Five Forks ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The enrollment of the Thirty-second will give no idea of its percentage of loss, for it received over 
800 men from disbanded regiments, many of these accessions occurring after the fighting was over. When 
finally disbanded, in July, 1865, it comprised the remnants of seven regiments, viz : the Ninth, Twelfth, Thirteenth, 
Eighteenth, Twenty-second, Thirty-second, and Thirty-ninth. It was organized, originally, as a battalion of six 
companies, for garrison duty at Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. The six companies left the State May 26, 1862, 
and after a month s encampment at Washington, on Capitol Hill, embarked for the Peninsula, joining General 
McClellan s Army July 3, 1862, just after Malvern Hill. It was assigned to Griffin s (2d) Brigade, Morell s (ist) 
Division, Fifth Corps ; four more companies joined the regiment soon after. The division was commanded at 
Gettysburg by General Barnes, and fought in the wheat field, the regiment losing 13 killed, 62 wounded, and 5 
missing, out of 229 taken into the fight. In January, 1864, 330 of the men recnlisted, and, being granted a 
furlough for thirty-five days, the regiment went to Boston. Soon after its return the army broke camp, and 
moved out to meet Lee in the Wilderness. At Spotsylvania the regiment encountered hard fighting, and, in the 
actions near that place, lost 23 killed, 101 wounded, and 5 missing; nearly one-half its effective strength. 
Colonel Prescott was killed in the disastrous assault on Petersburg, June 18, 1864. 



THKKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



171 



THIRTY-FOURTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 

\\ i i.i.s s r>i;i; \I>K THOBURN S DIVISION -- EIGHTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE I). WELLS; BVT. BRIO. GEN. (Killed). 



(2) COL. WILLIAM S. LINCOLN ; BVT. Bma.Onr. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DIMEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, Ac. 


Officers. 


\1. n. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



I 



I 

I 



I 
I 






13 

8 
8 

22 
14 

13 
IO 

IO 

17 

3 


2 

3 

9 

8 

23 
5 
13 

IO 

ii 
18 

i3 


I 









I 

* 
* 




II 

18 

20 
IO 

14 
12 

15 
II 

II 
10 


I 
1 1 
18 
20 

10 

M 

12 

5 

12 
I I 
10 


fonmanv \ . 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


7 


128 


J 35 


2 


132 


134 





Total 
Enrollment. 



16 

121 

I2 5 
118 

141 
127 
142 
132 

33 
126 

128 



135 killed 10.3 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 645 ; died in Confederate prisons, 54. 



BATTLES. 

Berryville, Va., Oct. 18, 1863. .. 
New Market, Va., May 15, 1864 
Piedmont, Va., June 5, 1864. 



K.&M.W. 

2 
39 

22 



Lynchburg, Va., June 18, 1864 6 

Island Ford, Va., July 1 8, 1864 3 

Berryville, Va., Sept. 4, 1864 i 

Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 23 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fisher s Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1 864 4 

Strasburg, Va., Oct. 1 3, 1 864 15 

Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864 5 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 31,1 865 2 

Fort Gregg, Va., April 2, 1 865 9 

High Bridge, Va., April 6, 1865 i 

Place Unknown 3 



Present, also, at Martinsburg ; Halltown ; Petersburg ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. Recruited in the five Western counties of the State. Colonel Wells had already served with honor 
able distinction as Lieutenant-Colonel of the First Massachusetts before he was transferred to the command of the 
Thirty-fourth. The regiment left Worcester, 1,015 strong, on August 15, 1862, and proceeded direct to Virginia. 
For several months it was stationed at Fort Lyon, near Alexandria, Va., and also did duty awhile in Washington. 
In July, 1863, it was ordered to Harper s Ferry, and, thence, on various campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley. It 
commenced the spring campaign of May, 1864, with 670 men present for duty, and took about 500 into the action 
at New Market, May 15, 1864, its casualties amounting to 28 killed, 1 74 wounded, and 19 missing; total, 221. 
At Piedmont it lost 15 killed, and 95 wounded ; at Opequon, 6 killed and 96 wounded out of less than 300 en 
gaged ; at Strasburg, 9 killed, 48 wounded, and 40 missing, out of 250 present in that fight. In the latter action 
Colonel Wells was killed and fell into the enemy s hands. In December, 1864, the regiment was transferred to 
Eastern Virginia, and assigned to Turner s Division, Twenty-fourth Corps, Army of the James. It participated 
in the desperate but victorious assault on the works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and, taking part in the pursuit 
of Lee s Array, was present at the final scenes at Appomattox. 



172 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRTY-FIFTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 
FERRERO S BRIGADE STURGIS S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWARD A. WILD ; BKIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. SUMNER CARRUTH ; Bvr. BKIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 
I 

I 

3 
i 




i 
i 




12 

T 3 

M 
4 
18 
8 

J 7 
3 
IS 
24 


I 

13 

14 

J 5 
4 

21 

9 
17 
J 3 
16 

25 





I 





* 

I 2 
10 

9 
6 

1 1 

1 1 

9 

13 

ii 

8 


12 

to 

9 

7 
ii 

1 1 

9 

J 3 
1 1 

8 


T 5 

M3 

167 

158 

i35 
141 

146 
162 
146 
140 

*43 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H. 


T . 


K 


Totals 


10 


138 


148 


I 


IOO 


101 


1,496 





Total killed and wounded, 539 ; died in Confederate prisons, 33. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



South Mountain, Md 5 

Antietam, Md 73 

Fredericksburg, Va 12 

Jackson, Miss 2 

Knoxville, Tenn 2 

Spotsylvania, Va 5 

North Anna, Va 2 



K. & M.W. 



Bethesda Church, Va ? 

Petersburg Mine, Va 13 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Weldon Railroad, Va 6 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 16 

Fort Sedgwick, Va 3 

Picket Line, Va., Dec. 27, 64 i 



Present, also, at Campbell s Station, Tenn. ; Wilderness, Va. ; Cold Harbor, Va. ; Hatcher s Run ; Fall of 
Petersburg. 



NOTES. Organized at Worcester, and left the State August 22, 1862. Both Colonel Wild and Lieutenant 
Colonel Carruth had seen service in the First Massachusetts. After a short stay on Arlington Heights, the regi 
ment was ordered to join McClellan s Army, then on its way to meet Lee in Maryland. It was assigned to 
Ferrero s (2d) Brigade, Reno s (2d) Division, Ninth Corps. It was engaged at South Mountain, where it won 
praises from all who saw it in action ; Colonel Wild received a serious wound there, resulting in amputation of an 
arm. Three days later, the regiment fought at Antietam, the casualty list at that battle footing up 48 killed, 160 
wounded, and 6 missing ; Major Sidney Willard, who was in command, was killed while cheering on his men. 
The Thirty-fifth accompanied the corps in its western campaigns in Kentucky, at Vicksburg, and at the siege of 
Knoxville, Tenn. Upon its return to Virginia it was brigaded in the First Brigade of Stevenson s (ist) Division, 
from which it was subsequently transferred to Potter s (2 d) Division. At Poplar Spring Church the regiment, 
under Lieutenant-Colonel Hudson, lost 6 killed, 19 wounded, and 156 prisoners, the latter loss occurring not 
through any fault of the men, nor of the officers. The Thirty-fifth remained on duty before Petersburg, suffering 
heavy losses in the trenches, and sharing in the triumphant termination of the siege. 



TIIKKE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



173 



THIRTY-SEVENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. 

EUSTIS S BRIGADK -GETTY S DIVISION --SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. OLIVER EDWARDS; RVT. MAJOR.QKN. 



(2) COL. RUFUS I. LINCOLN. 



(8) COL. MASON W. TYI.KK 



COMPANIES. 


KIT i i. n AND DIED op WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IIINON. Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( HHcera. 


M, . 


Total. 



IO 
IO 

8 
1 1 

9 

7 
7 
3 
9 
8 


Field and Staff 





I 




I 
I 
I 








9 
28 

I? 
5 

5 
16 

14 
16 

13 

I 2 




9 

2 9 

7 

5 
16 

7 

15 
16 

3 

12 



* 











* 

IO 
IO 

8 
1 1 

9 
7 
7 
3 

9 
8 


16 

45 
130 

127 

I2 5 

37 
123 

"3 

142 
127 

39 


PVtnnnanv -\ . 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 




4 


65 


169 





92 




9 2 


.324 





169 killed 12.7 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 588; died in Confederate prisons, 12. 



BATTLES. 

Charlestown, W. Va 

Opequon, Va 

Siege of Petersburg, Va. 
Fall of Petersburg, Va. , 

Sailor s Creek, Va 

Place Unknown 



K.&M.W. 

.... 5 

... 22 

8 

8 

14 

... 2 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1862) i 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1863) 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 

Wilderness, Va 54 

Spotsylvania, Va 32 

Cold Harbor, Va 12 

Fort Stevens, 1). C 2 

Present, also, at Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Composed of Berkshire County men, and left the State Sept. 7, 1862. Arriving in Maryland it 
was assigned to Devens s (2d) Brigade of Couch s Division. This division was soon after attached to the Sixth 
Corps as the Third Division, General Newton in command. The Thirty-seventh participated in several battles, 
displaying praiseworthy steadiness, but sustaining slight loss, until Grant s campaign in 1864, when it took part in 
some bloody fighting. It crossed the Rapidan May 5, 1864, with 609 officers and men present for duty, and was 
soon in the thickest of the Wilderness fight. It lost there 30 killed, 101 wounded, and 6 missing; the latter 
were undoubtedly killed. An equally large percentage of loss occurred at Spotsylvania. In the various actions 
and skirmishes about that place, from May 8th to May 2ist, its casualties amounted to 16 killed, 65 wounded, and 
10 missing. In July the regiment was placed in the Third Brigade, Russell s (ist) Division, Colonel Edwards 
being placed in command of the brigade. At the battle of the Opequon the regiment lost 12 killed, and 79 
wounded out of 296 men present in that action, and captured a stand of colors from Stonewall Jackson s old regi 
ment. At Sailor s Creek the Thirty-seventh was commanded by Captain Arch. Hopkins, and encountered there 
some of the closest hand-to-hand fighting of the war. The regiment was one of the first to enter Petersburg, the 
surrender of the city being made to Colonel Edwards by the Mayor and Aldermen, Colonel Edwards being in 
command of the Sixth Corps skirmish-line. 



174 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTY-SIXTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY. "FIRST VETERAN." 
CARRUTH S BRIGADE STEVENSON S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. CHARLES E. GRISWOLD (Killed). 



(2) COL. STEPHEN M. WELD, JR.; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

m 

I 
I 

2 


* 




12 
10 

16 

14 

IO 

15 

IO 
10 

15 

8 


2 
12 
10 

*7 

5 
12 

15 
10 

IO 
15 

8 
















5 
7 
6 

12 
12 
IO 

1 3 
r 3 

J 3 
9 


* 

5 
7 
6 

12 
12 
IO 

J 3 
*3 

J 3 
9 


J 3 

104 

93 
109 

I0 5 
I0 5 
9i 
99 

122 
I0 3 
I0 3 




B . 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


6 


I2O 


126 





100 


too 


1,047 





126 killed = 12 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 447; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 47. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 23 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12. 20 

Spotsylvania, May 1 8 10 

North Anna, Va 1 1 

Bethesda Church, Va ." . 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg Assault 21 

Present, also, at Hatcher s Run. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Petersburg Mine 13 

Weldon Railroad, Va 3 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 3 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 10 

Picket, July, 30, 1864 i 

Fall of Petersburg 4 



NOTES. Organized at Readville, Mass., recruiting having commenced in December, 1863. Many of the 
men had served terms of enlistment in other regiments. It left the State March 21, 1864, and, with about 850 
men, proceeded to Annapolis, where it was attached to the First Brigade, Stevenson s (ist) Division, Ninth Corps. 
In the latter part of April it marched to Alexandria, Va., and thence to the Wilderness. Colonel Griswold was 
killed in that action, and the casualties, as given in the State reports, were 9 killed, 57 wounded, and 10 missing. 
At Spotsylvania, May i2th, it lost 10 killed, 41 wounded, and i missing; on the iSth, it also lost there 5 killed, 
and 40 wounded. In the charge of the Ninth Corps on the works at Petersburg June 1 7, 1864 the regiment 
was prominently engaged, its losses amounting to 10 killed, 51 wounded, and 16 missing; this was its hardest fight. 
It also sustained serious losses while in the trenches before Petersburg, men being killed or wounded daily for 
several weeks. At the Mine Explosion it lost 4 killed, 21 wounded, and 25 missing. The Fifty- dxth was a steady, 
reliable, fighting regiment ; although its losses, numerically, were not extraordinary, yet its percentage of killed 
was far above the average and entitles it to distinction. The Division was broken up in August, 1864, and the 
regiment transferred to Potter s (2d) Division. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



175 



FIFTY-SEVENTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY -"SECOND VETERAN." 
BARTLETT S (W. F.) BRIGADE- WHITE S DIVISION- NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM F. BARTLKTT ; BVT. MAJOK-HEN. U. S. V. (2) Coi.. N. B. McLAUOHLIN ; BVT. Bum. KN. U. 8. A. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIEM OF WOUNDS. 


DlEII OF I >l-l \M . ACCIDENT!*, 


IN I lusos, &t\ 
Tot n!. 



I I 

8 
4 

10 

3 

8 

10 

ii 
1 1 

10 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Field and Staff. . 


3 

2 

2 

I 
I 




I 







26 
I 9 

16 

18 

20 
5 

18 

20 
20 

19 


3 
28 
21 
16 

9 

21 

5 

18 

21 
20 

J 9 











t 



* 

I I 

8 
4 

10 

3 

8 

10 

ii 
1 1 

10 


18 

I 12 
1 08 
107 
1 06 
9 8 
9 8 
9 8 

10 5 

102 
IOO 




B . 


C . 


I) . 


E . 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


IO 


I 9 I 


201 


86 


86 


1,052 





201 killed - 19.1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 716; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 37. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 94 

Spotsylvania, Va 32 

North Anna, Va 15 

Bethesda Church. Va i 

Petersburg, Va., assault, June 1 7, 1 864 20 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 7 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Petersburg Mine, Va 15 

Weldon Railroad, Va 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 4 

Fort Stedman, Va 10 

Place Unknown i 



Present, also, at Cold Harbor ; Boydton Road ; Fall of Petersburg. 



NOTES. This regiment was in active service less than a year, and yet its percentage of killed was one of the 
highest of the war. It left the State April 18, 1864, proceeding to Annapolis where it joined the Ninth Corps - 
First Brigade, First Division, and marched soon after on its way to join the Army of the Potomac. At the Wil 
derness it was hotly engaged, and with severe loss, its casualties amounting to 57 killed, 158 wounded, and 30 
missing; total, 245 out of 24 officers and 521 men engaged; one company, H, was not in this action, having 
been detailed on duty elsewhere just at that time. Colonel Bartlett was seriously wounded in this battle. In the 
two actions in which the Ninth Corps was engaged at Spotsylvania, it also suffered a severe percentage of loss, 
losing on May i2th, 13 killed, 55 wounded, and 4 missing; on May i8th, 3 killed, and 14 wounded. The regi 
ment made a brilliant charge in the assault on Petersburg - - June i 7th carrying the works at the point of the 
bayonet ; loss, 1 1 killed, 30 wounded, and 3 missing. Lieutenant-Colonel Charles L. Chamberlain, a very able 
officer was killed at the North Anna, and Major Albert Prescott, in the charge following the Mine Explosion at 
Petersburg. In this action, the regiment lost 4 killed, 16 wounded, and 31 missing. It had become so reduced 
in numbers that it could only muster about 70 men present in the battle at Poplar Spring Church. Major James 
Doherty fell, mortally wounded, at Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865. 



176 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTBY--" THIRD VETERAN." 
BLISS S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



COL. JOHN C. WHITON. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
2 
I 
I 




I 

* 

2 
I 






*7 
13 

16 
i7 

13 

ii 

16 
ii 

i3 

2 


2 

J 9 
M 

!7 

i? 

*3 
12 

16 

13 

14 

2 






* 










16 
16 
20 

10 
20 

17 

2O 

21 
IO 

6 


16 
16 

20 
10 
20 

17 
20 

21 
IO 
6 


13 

1 08 

106 

112 
101 

109 

93 
96 

IOO 

82 

112 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


IO 


129 


139 





156 


156 


1,032 





139 killed = 13. 4 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 491 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 89. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 13 

Spotsylvania, Va., May S-u> 3 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 23 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 13-20 4 

North Anna, Va i 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Shady Grove Road, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Bethesda Church, Va 31 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 4 

Petersburg Assault, Va 12 

Petersburg Mine, Va 14 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 17 

Peeble s Farm, Va 7 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 7 



Present, also, at Weldon Railroad ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort Sedgwick. 



NOTES. Recruiting for this regiment commenced in September, 1863, but only eight companies were or 
ganized up to April, 1864. These companies left the State April 28, 1864. The ninth company joined the 
regiment in June, but the tenth did not arrive until January, 1865. Upon its arrival in Virginia it was assigned 
toCurtin s (ist) Brigade, Potter s (2d) Division, Ninth Corps. Within one week after its departure from Mass 
achusetts the eight companies entered the bloody battle of the Wilderness, losing 6 killed, 32 wounded, and 7 
missing. A week later it was engaged at Spotsylvania, and, in the actions of May i2th and i8th, lost 17 killed, 
83 wounded, and 5 missing. The regiment moved against the works at Cold Harbor June 3d with a line 
whose steadiness and precision elicited praise from all who saw it, winning the compliments of both brigade and 
division commanders. In that fight it took an advanced position and held it until the close of the action ; its 
casualties were 24 killed, 83 wounded, and 18 missing; Major Barnabas Ewer, Jr., a favorite officer, was among 
the killed. The Fifty-eighth was also conspicuous for its gallant action in the assault on Petersburg June i7th 
-in which the brigade carried a line of works, but with a comparative slight loss to the regiment. At Poplar 
Spring Church it lost 90 officers and men taken prisoners, after which the regiment was so reduced in numbers 
that it was relieved from active duty. It received some accessions which enabled it to resume its position, and 
it participated in the final assault on Petersburg. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



177 



SECOND RHODE ISLAND INFANTRY. 
EUSTIS S BRIGADE- --GETTY S J )i VISION - SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN 8. SLOCUM (Killed). 

(8) COL. FKANK WII EATON ; B. *., BVT. MAJ.-GBN. U. S. A. 

(8) COL. NELSON VIALL. 



(4) COL. HOHATIO KOOEKN ; BVT. Uitlci.-GEN. U. 8. V. 

(5) COL. 8. B. M. UEAI). 

(0) Coi.. KL1SIIA II. KlioDES. 



COMPANIES. 


KM i i.i> AND DIEIJ or Wor.NiM). DIKII or I>I*KASK, ACCIIIENTM, IN I IIIMON, *r. 


Total 

1 MI pill iin 

16 

43 

140 

5* 
5 

157 

171 

47 
164 

IS* 
164 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


oftloens. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 




I 

2 
I 

2 
I 




12 
IO 

4 

I 2 
4 

5 

I 2 

4 

I 2 

16 


2 
12 
IO 

14 
12 

5 
7 
13 
4 
M 
7 









I 



IO 

8 
6 

6 

7 
9 

IO 

6 
7 

74 




10 

8 
6 

5 
6 

7 

9 
1 1 

6 

8 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


1 1 1 


1 20 


2 


76 


1,560 





Total of killed and wounded, 428 ; Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 12. 
The above enrollment does not include the reorganized regiment. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

First Bull Run, Va 24 

Yorktown, Va i 

Oak Grove, Va 8 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Salem Heights, Va 20 

Gettysburg, Pa i 

Williamsport, Md i 



BATTLES. K.&.M.w. 

Wilderness, Va 23 

Spotsylvania, Va 19 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Opequon, Va 2 

Petersburg, Va 2 

Sailor s Creek, Va 14 



Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Seven Days; Antietam ; Fredericksburg (1862); Marye s Heights ; Rappa- 
hannock Station ; Fort Stevens ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. The Second was Rhode Island s fighting regiment. It fired the opening volley at First Bull Run, and 
was inline at the final scenes of Appomattox. It arrived at Washington, June 22, 1861, and after a few weeks 
encampment there, marched to the field of First Bull Run. It was then in Burnside s Brigade, of Hunter s Divi 
sion. Burnside opened that fight with the First Rhode Island deployed as skirmishers, and the Second advanc 
ing in line of battle. Its casualties in that engagement aggregated 98 in killed, wounded and missing ; among 
the killed were Colonel Slocum, Major Sullivan Ballon, and two captains. During the Peninsular campaign it 
served in Palmer s (3d) Brigade, Couch s (ist) Division, Fourth Corps; this division was transferred in October, 
1862, to the Sixth Corps as Newton s (3d) Division. The regiment, under Colonel Rogers, distinguished itself 
in the hard-fought battle of the Sixth Corps at Salem Heights, May 3, 1863, in which action it lost 7 killed, 68 
wounded, and 6 missing. At the Wilderness, it lost 12 killed, 66 wounded, and 5 missing ; and at Spotsylvania, 
15 killed, 32 wounded, and 6 missing. In the final battle of the Sixth Corps at Sailor s Creek, April 6, 1865 
-the regiment displayed remarkable fighting qualities, engaging the enemy in an action so close that men were 
bayoneted, and clubbed muskets were freely used. The original regiment was mustered out June 17, 1864, the 
recruits ami reeniisted men left in the field were organized into a battalion of three companies, to which five new 

ones were subsequently added in the fall and winter of 1864-5. 
1* 



178 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SECOND CONNECTICUT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
UPTON S BRIGADE WRIGHT S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. LEVERETT W. WESSELLS. 

(2) COL. ELISHA S. KELLOGG (Killed). 



(3) COL. RANALD S. MACKENZIE, OT. $., B. 8.; BRIG. GEN. U. S. A. 

(4) COL. JAMES HUBBARD ; BVT. BRIG. GKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

3 

2 

I 
I 
I 

I 
I 


2 9 

3 1 
19 
3 
35 
9 
16 

9 

21 
2 9 

8 
6 


2 
3 2 

33 

20 

3 1 

36 

9 
16 

10 

21 

2 9 

9 
6 






i 



i 







* 


I 

12 

14 
21 

*5 

17 
17 

17 
13 
15 

15 

9 

5 


I 

12 

14 

22 

15 

18 

17 

J 7 
13 

15 
15 

9 

5 


J 7 
209 

207 
208 
204 

237 
198 

195 

207 

2OI 
I 7 8 
229 
2l6 




B . 


c 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H. 


I 


K 


L 


M 




Totals . 


I 2 


242 


254 


2 


171 


173 


2,506 





254 killed = 10.1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 882. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Picket, North Anna, Va i 

Hanovertown, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va., June i, 1864 129 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 4 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 8 

Jerusalem Road, Va 10 

Opequon, Va 36 

Present, also, at Fort Stevens ; Appomattox. 



K. &M.W. 

4 



BATTLES. 

Fisher s Hill, Va 

Cedar Creek, Va 44 

Hatcher s Run, Va 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 65 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 

Sailor s Creek, Va 

Place Unknown 



NOTES. Recruited in Litchfield County under the second call for troops, as the Nineteenth Infantry. It 
left the State September 15, 1862, proceeding to Alexandria, Va., in which vicinity it was stationed during the 
ensuing year, engaged in garrison duty within the fortifications. In November, 1863, it was changed to a heavy 
artillery organization, and the additional number of men made necessary thereby were soon recruited and sent 
forward. On May 17, 1864, it left Alexandria with about 1,600 men, and, acting as infantry, marched to the 
front, where it was assigned to Upton s (ad) Brigade, Russell s (ist) Division, Sixth Corps. Its first engagement 
was in the storming of the earth works at Cold Harbor, where its casualties amounted to 85 killed, 221 wounded, 
and 19 missing; the most of the latter were killed or wounded. In that assault the regiment, about 1,400 
strong, led the column with fixed bayonets and uncapped muskets, Colonel Kellogg falling in advance of his 
men, pierced by several bullets. In the battle at the Opequon the regiment lost 20 killed, and 118 wounded, the 
killed including Major James Q. Rice and five line officers. Its casualties at Cedar Creek footed up 21 
killed, 107 wounded, and 62 missing. The regiment took part in the repulse of the Confederate sortie at 
Petersburg March 25, 1865 and in the closing victories of the war. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



170 



SEVENTH CONNECTICUT INFANTRY. 
HAWLEY S BRIGADE TERRY S DIYISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ALFRED H. TERRY ; BVT MAJOR-GEN. U. 8. A. (2) COL. JOSEPH K. HAWLEY ; BVT. MAJOU-UKN. U. 8. V. 

(3) COL. SEAdEK S. ATWELL. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIEII OK Worso*. 


DIKU or DIHEAHE, AWIIIENTN, IN I KIMIN. Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


M. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 





2 
I 
2 
2 
I 
I 
I 
I 






3 2 

15 
1 1 

9 
M 
5 

7 
M 
15 
5 




32 
7 

12 
21 

16 
16 

8 

5 
16 

i5 


3 






i 










2 3 
3> 
26 

2 3 
1 6 

10 

i i 
1 8 

7 

7 


3 

23 

3 

26 

23 

7 

10 

1 1 
18 

17 

7 


i? 
74 
161 

55 
1 68 

*39 
192 

166 

5 
181 

54 


Comnanv A . 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals 


I I 


57 


168 


4 


192 


196 


.657 





168 killed = 10. i per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 598 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 68. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W 

James Island, S. C 19 

Pocotaligo, S. C 6 

Morris Island, S. C 4 

Fort Wagner, S. C 28 

Olustee, Fla to 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 45 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 24 



BATTLEH. K.&M.W. 

Deep Bottom, Va 15 

Near Richmond, Va., Oct. i, 1864 3 

New Market Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1 864 2 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 5 

Charles City Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 2 

Fort Fisher, N. C 5 



Present, also, at Fort Pulaski ; Chester Station : Wilmington. 



NOTES. Recruited in various counties of the State. Colonel Terry had already served as Colonel of the 
Second, a three months regiment which fought at First Bull Run. It left the State September 18, 1861, and in 
the following month sailed from Annapolis for Port Royal, with General Sherman s (T. W.) expedition. It dis 
played a praiseworthy efficiency and steadiness in its first battle --James Island where, when ordered to retire, 
it halted, dressed its alignment under fire, and retired by battalion front as if on parade ; casualties, 9 killed, 69 
wounded, and 4 missing. In January, 1863, it went to Fernandina, Fla., but in May, four companies A, B, I, 
and K, returned to Hilton Head, S. C. These four companies were in Strong s Brigade, and were engaged in 
the first assault on Fort Wagner, July 1 1, 1863, where they displayed unusual gallantry. Out of 191 officers and 
men carried to that assault, 103 were killed, wounded or missing. At Drewry s Bluff, the Seventh sustained its 
greatest loss ; 30 killed, 104 wounded, and 69 missing or prisoners. In the affair at Bermuda Hundred, June 
ad, 1864, it also lost 78 captured, in addition to 25 killed or wounded. The regiment sailed with General 
Terry s expedition to Fort Fisher then in Abbott s Brigade, Ames s Division, and took part in the successful 
storming of that stronghold. After the capture of Fort Fisher, the Tenth Corps, and with it the Seventh Con 
necticut, remained in North Carolina until after the close of the war. 



180 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TENTH CONNECTICUT INFANTRY. 
PLAISTED S BRIGADE TERRY S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. CHARLES L. RUSSELL (Killed). (2) COL. ALBERT W. DRAKE (Died). (3) COL. IRA W. PETTIBONE. 

(4) COL. JOHN L. OTIS; BVT. BRIO. GEN. (5) COL. EDWIN S. GREELEY ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

3 
i 



i 

i 



2 

3 






II 
10 

9 

12 

16 

IO 

5 
J 5 

10 

1 1 


2 

M 
I I 

9 
13 

*7 

10 

7 
18 

IO 

1 1 


2 

I 



* 



I 



I 




* 

H 
2O 

14 

J 7 
16 

10 

18 
i7 
*9 

10 


2 

IS 
2O 

M 

J 7 
16 

IO 

19 

7 

20 
10 


20 
I 7 6 
172 
1 60 

166 
182 
146 

58 
204 

178 
166 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


13 


109 


122 


5 


J 55 


I 6O 


1,728 





Total of killed and wounded, 433 ; died in Confederate prisons, n. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Roanoke Island, N. C 12 

New Berne, N. C 9 

Kinston, N. C 34 

St. Augustine, Fla i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 10 

Deep Bottom, Va 17 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Petersburg, Va 3 

New Market Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 4 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 9 

Hatcher s Run, Va 2 

Fort Gregg, Va > . 21 



Present, also, at Whitehall ; Seabrook Island ; Siege of Charleston ; Walthall Junction ; Bermuda Hundred ; 
Strawberry Plains Laurel Hill Church ; Johnson s Plantation ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. Recruited in various counties. It left the State November i, 1861, and proceeded to Annapolis, 
where it embarked with the Burnside expedition to North Carolina. It was placed in Foster s (ist) Brigade, and 
was engaged at Roanoke Island, its casualties in that action amounting to 6 killed and 49 wounded. Colonel 
Russell fell there, the first one of the Connecticut colonels killed in the war. At the battle of Kinston, N. C., 
December 14, 1862 the heaviest loss fell on the Tenth Connecticut, it having been entrusted with the most 
prominent part. It lost there 1 1 killed, and 39 wounded, out of 366 engaged ; five line officers were killed or 
mortally wounded. The remarkable gallantry of the regiment in this action was publicly acknowledged at its close 
by General Foster, in words of extreme praise. At that battle it was in Stevenson s (2d) Brigade, Foster s (ist) 
Division. In April, 1864, the Tenth joined the Army of the James, and participated in all its battles. It was 
engaged at Deep Bottom with a loss of 8 killed, 64 wounded, and 10 missing. Major Henry W. Camp, the 
" Knightly Soldier," was killed at Darbytown Road. The regiment was transferred in December, to Foster s ( ist) 
Division, Twenty-fourth Corps, in which command it took the lead in the victorious but desperate assault on Fort 
Gregg, its losses there amounting to 1 1 killed and 79 wounded. Its flag was the first on the parapet, and the 
gallantry displayed there by the regiment was signally acknowledged by General Gibbon, the corps commander. 



TlIKKK HUNDRED FldHTINO ItEUlHKNTS. 



ELEVENTH CONNECTICUT INFANTRY. 
HARLAND S BRIGADE -- RODMAN S DIVISION- NINTH ( OKI S. 



(1) COL. T. H. C. KIXOSIUTBT. 

(2) COL. IIENKV W. KINUSIU KY ; 



. (Killed). 



(3) COL. ORIFFI\ A. STKDMAN, .In.; BVT. Itniu. OEM. <Klll*l). 
MM oi.. HANDAI.I. II. RICE. 



( OXPANIKN. 


KILLED AND DIKD or WOUNDS. 


DIKD OK DISEASE, ACCIDENT*, IN PHIMON, Ac. 


ToUil 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


j 

* 

I 
I 
1 




2 






IO 

6 

22 
IS 
12 
12 

1 

24 

5 
14 


- 

10 
22 

1 9 

3 
3 
/ 
24 
7 
14 


I 












7 
>7 
3 
2 5 
24 
1 8 

19 

5 

10 

1 8 


I 
17 
7 
3 
2 5 
24 
1 8 

9 
5 

10 

1 8 

77 


20 
207 
I 9 2 
20 3 

95 
217 

191 
181 
194 
170 

95 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


140 


148 


I 


,76 


i ,965 





Total of killed and wounded, 532 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 45. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

New Berne, N. C 12 

Antietam, Md 48 

Suffolk, Va 2 

Swift Creek, Va 3 

Palmer s Creek, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. *M.\V 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 22 

Cold Harl)or, Va 28 

Petersburg Assault (1864) 13 

Siege of Petersburg 15 

Place Unknown 3 



Present, also, at Roanoke Island ; South Mountain ; Fredericksburg ; Petersburg Mine ; Fall of Richmond. 



NOTES. Organized at Hartford, and left the State Dec 16, 1861, proceeding to Annapolis, where it joined 
the Burnside expedition to North Carolina. It was then in Parke s ^d) Brigade, Burnside s Division, with 
which it was present at New Berne ; its casualties there were 6 killed, and 21 wounded. In July, 1862, it moved 
to Newport News ; here the Colonel resigned, and was succeeded by Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, of the 
Fourteenth U. S. Infantry, who thereupon put the regiment in a high state of drill, discipline, and efficiency. In 
the meantime it had been assigned to the Ninth Corps Harland s (2d) Brigade, Sturgis s (2(1) Division - 
with which it marched to Antietam; its losses on that field were 36 killed and 103 wounded; no missing; 
Colonel Kingsbury was killed there. Under Colonel Stedman the regiment was present at Fredericksburg, but 
was only slightly engaged. In Febniary, 1863, the Connecticut Brigade moved to south-eastern Virginia, and the 
Eleventh passed that year in the vicinity of Suffolk and Norfolk, during which it was engaged in several expedi 
tions into the enemy s country, and in some minor engagements. It re-enlisted and received a large number of 
recruits, taking the field in 1864 with 882 enlisted men present. In the various actions at Drewry s Bluff it lost 
15 killed, 65 wounded, and 127 captured; at Cold Harbor, the casualties were 12 killed, 92 wounded, and 6 
missing. Major Joseph H. Converse receiving a mortal wound. The Regiment was then in the Eighteenth 
Corps. Colonel Stedman was killed in the trenches before Petersburg. In December, 1 864, the regiment was 
transferred to Ripley s (ist) Brigade, Devens s (3d) Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. 



182 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FOURTEENTH CONNECTICUT INFANTRY. 
CARROLL S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1)COL. DWIGHT MORRIS. 



(2) COL. THEODORE G. ELLIS ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, <fcc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 




2 
2 

I 



3 

2 

2 
I 
2 
2 


I 

1 1 
21 

16 

23 
13 
23 
15 
29 

22 
14 


I 

3 
2 3 
17 
2 3 
16 

2 5 
J 7 

3 
24 

16 









I 






I 

18 
16 
24 
J 9 

15 

16 

21 

18 

21 

22 


I 

18 
16 
24 

19 

S 

16 

22 

18 

21 

22 


17 

180 
163 

183 
173 

I 5 l 

167 

146 
186 
198 
1 60 




B . 


C . 


D 


E . 


F . 


G. 


H 


T . 


K. 


Totals . 


I? 


1 88 


205 


I 


I 9 I 


192 


1,724 





205 killed = ii. 8 percent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 727 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 78. 



BATTLES. K. &M. W. 

Antietam, Md 35 

Fredericksburg, Va 46 

Chancellorsville, Va 4 

Gettysburg, Pa 15 

Bristoe Station, Va 13 

Morton s Ford, Va 20 

Wilderness, Va 21 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 



BATTLES. K.&M. W. 

North Anna, Va 8 

Cold Harbor, Va 7 

Petersburg, Va 5 

Deep Bottom, Va 2 

Ream s Station, Va 10 

Boydton Road, Va 5 

Hatcher s Run, Va 4 



Present, also, at Falling Waters ; Auburn ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; High Bridge ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. The Fourteenth sustained the largest percentage of loss of any regiment from the State. It left 
Hartford August 25, 1862, and joined McClellan s Army while on the march to Antietam, being assigned to 
Morris s (2d) Brigade, French s (3d) Division, Second Corps. Its losses at Antietam were 20 killed, 88 wounded, 
and 48 missing; at Fredericksburg, n killed, 87 wounded, and 22 missing. The Fourteenth won special and 
merited honors at Gettysburg by a charge, on the forenoon of the third day, in which it drove the enemy s 
sharpshooters out of a barn situated between the lines. In the afternoon it assisted in the repulse of Pickett s 
charge, at which time the regiment captured five stands of colors. Its casualties at Gettysburg, were 10 killed, 
52 wounded, and 4 missing. In the affair at Morton s Ford February 6, 1864 the brunt of the fight fell on 
the Fourteenth ; it was ably handled there by Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel A. Moore, and its casualties were 6 
killed, 90 wounded, and 19 missing. In March, 1864, it was transferred to Gibbon s (2d) Division, in which it 
remained without further change. In December, 1864, the regiment had become reduced to 180 men for duty; 
it was armed with Sharpe s rifles, and though small in numbers, was considered one of the best in the division. In 
the final battles of the war its percentage of loss was heavy in each action, although not numerically large. 



TllKKK HUNDKKD Fl<iUTINU REGIMENTS. 



183 



FIRST NEW YORK DRAGOONS. (19TH N. Y. CAV Y). 
MERKITT S BRIGADE - TORBERT S DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS, A. P. 



(1) COL. ALFRED 3IBBS. CH. JJ.. B. *. , BVT. MAJOU-OKN. U. 8. A. (2) COL. THOMAS J. THORP ; BVT. BRIO.-GXN. U. 8. V. 



COMPANIES. 


KM I MI AND DlKI) OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OK DIMEAHK, ACCIDENTH, IN PIUHON, Ac. 


TotuI 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( iflicers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field anil Staff 






i 




2 



I 

* 


* 

21 
I I 

16 
6 

10 

16 

3 
1 1 

13 
9 




21 

1 I 

7 
6 

10 

18 

13 
1 1 

4 
9 


* 



I 









15 
10 

7 
16 

8 

21 

14 
12 
2O 

7 




15 
IO 

7 
1 6 

8 

22 

4 

12 
2O 

7 
r 3 


1 6 
144 
127 

I2 5 
141 

35 
54 

IS 
149 

5 

I 21 


Company A 


B 


c 


D. 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


4 


126 


!3 


I 


3 


1,414 





K. AM.W. 

Shepherdstown, Va 

Smithfield, Va 4 

Opequon, Va 4 

Fisher s Hill, Va i 

New Market, Va 3 

Port Republic, Va i 

Newtown, Va 5 

Cedar Creek, Va 2 

London Valley, Va i 

Petersburg, Va . 4 

Five Forks, Va i 



Total of killed and wounded, 461 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 33. 
BATTLES. K.AM.\V. HATIM- 

Deserted House, Va 7 

Suffolk, Va 3 

Blackwater, Va 2 

Manassas Plains, Va 3 

Todd s Tavern, Va 31 

Spotsylvania, Va 2 

Yellow Tavern, Va 2 

Hungary, Va 2 

Old Church, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 14 

Trevilian Station, Va 26 

White Post, Va 7 

NOTES. Organized at Portage, N. Y., as the One Hundred and Thirtieth Infantry, and served as such at 
Suffolk, Va., and in Keyes s Peninsular campaign. On July 28, 1863, it was transferred to the mounted service 
under the designation of the First New York Dragoons. Colonel Gibbs, who belonged to the United States 
Cavalry service, drilled the men in their new duties, and on the night of October 17, 1863, the Dragoons made 
their first fight as such at Manassas Plains. The regiment started on Grant s campaign of 1864 with about 400 
carbines, and in the Wilderness (at Todd s Tavern), having dismounted, made a desperate fight, sustaining the 
heaviest loss of any cavalry regiment in any one action during the war ; its casualties in the Wilderness amounted 
to 20 killed, 36 wounded, and 35 missing. At Cold Harbor, the wearied troopers were sleeping on the ground, 
bridle-rein in hand, when they were awakened and ordered into the breastworks, which they gallantly defended 
while their band played gaily during the entire fight. At Trevilian Station, the remnant of the Dragoons were 
actively engaged, their casualties in that action amounting to 16 killed, 61 wounded, and 8 missing. After fight 
ing under Sheridan in his famous Shenandoah campaign, and sharing the glories of the final scenes at Appom- 
attox, the regiment was mustered out, June 30, 1865. The Dragoons ranked high in the estimation of its various 
brigade and division generals, as a regiment of superior discipline and efficiency. During all its mounted service 
the regiment was in the First Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac. 



184: 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SECOND NEW YORK CAVALRY- -" HARRIS LIGHT." 
MclNTosn s BRIGADE -- WILSON S DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS, A. P. 

5., BVT. MAJOR-GEN., U. S. A. 
& 3. BVT. BKIG-GEN., U S. A. 



(1) COL. J. MANSFIELD DAVIES. (2) COL. JUDSON KILPATRICK. 033. $., 

(3) COL HENRY E DAVIES JR. HA.IOR-GEN. U. S. V. (4) COL. OTTO HARHAUS. 

(5) COL WALTER C. HULL (Killed) (6) COL. ALEXANDER M. RANDOL, OT 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 



I 
I 

2 







I 
I 

I 




4 
6 

13 

5 

5 
16 

8 
J 9 

12 

9 

5 
10 


2 

4 
7 
14 

7 

5 
16 

8 

!9 
12 

10 

6 
II 


* 





I 



I 








3 

20 

42 

14 
2 5 
J 3 

20 

21 
2O 
12 

9 
16 

J 9 


3 
20 

42 
14 
2 5 
14 

20 
22 
20 
12 

9 
16 

!9 


36 
241 

2 59 
207 

211 

95 
J74 
2 37 

2OI 
179 

T 53 
207 

228 




B . 


C. 


D 


E . 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


9 


112 


121 


2 


234 


236 


2,528 





Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 91. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Falmouth, Va., April 17, 1862 6 

Rapidan Station, Va., Aug. 18,1862 i 

Rappahannock, Va., Aug. 20, 1862 2 

Thoroughfare Gap, Va.,Aug.28, 62 2 

Manassas, Va., Aug. 29, 1862 12 

Leesburg, Va., Sept. 18, 1862 i 

Salem, Va., Nov. 9, 1862 i 

Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863. 5 

Aldie, Va., June 17,1863 18 

Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863... 2 

Upperville, Va., June 20, 1863. ... i 

Jones s Cross Roads, Va., July 10/63 2 

Brandy Station, Va., Sept. 14, 1863 i 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Robinson s Ford, Va., Sept. 16, 1863 I 

White s Ford, Va., Sept. 22, 1863.. 3 

Hazel River, Va., Oct. 6, 1863. ... i 

Culpepper, Va., Oct. n, 1863 i 

Buckland s Mills, Va., Oct. 19, 1863 3 

Raccoon Ford, Va., Dec. 5, 1863.. i 

Richmond Raid, Va., Mch. i, 1864 2 

New Kent C. H., Va., Mch. 3, 1864 I 

Craig s Church, Va., May 5, 1864. . 5 

Hanover C. H., Va., May 29, 1864 2 

Stony Creek, Va., June 28, 1864. . . 2 

Ream s Station, Va., June 29, 1864 4 

Charlestown, W. Va., Aug. 22, 1864 2 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Shepherdstown, Va., Aug. 25, 1864 3 

Waynesboro, Va., Sept. 2, 1864. ... i 

Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 

Luray Valley, Va., Sept. 22, 1864. . 3 

Bridgevvater, Va., Oct. 4, 1864. ... i 

New Market, Va., Oct. 8, 1864 i 

Cedar Creek, Va., Nov. 12, 1864. . . 3 

Mt. Jackson, Va., Nov. 22, 1864 4 

Ashland, Va., Mch. 15, 1865 2 

Five Forks, Va., April i, 1865 7 

Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1865. ... 6 

Appomattox, Va., April 8,1865... 2 

On Picket and at Places Unknown 3 



Present, also, at many other engagements in which it lost men wounded or captured, but none killed. 

NOTES. Called the " Harris Light " in honor of the Honorable Ira Harris, of Albany, N. Y.,then United 
States Senator. The Second was ably officered and was one of the most famous of the New York cavalry regi 
ments. Colonel Hull was killed at Cedar Creek, and Major O Keefe fell in the final campaign. The Second 
was recruited from New York City, Long Island, Rensselaer and Washington counties, with two companies from 
Indiana, and two from Connecticut. The term of enlistment expired in September, 1864, when it returned 
home, leaving about 350 men in the field composed of recruits with unexpired terms, and veterans "who had 
reenlisted. These men were organized into a battalion of four companies, and eight more companies composed 
of fresh recruits were added. These eight companies, which were raised in Cortland and Onondaga counties, 
were enlisted for one year only. While on Pope s campaign, Aug. 16-31, 1862, the Second lost n killed, 27 
wounded, and 45 captured or missing; total, 83. In the cavalry action at Aldie, Va., June 17, 1863, it lost 16 
killed, 19 wounded, and 15 missing; total, 50. In 1863 the regiment was in Gregg s (2d) Division, but in 
1864-65 it served in Wilson s (3d) Division, afterward Custer s. 



TIIUKK HUNDRED FKJHTINQ KKUIMKNTS. 



185 



EIGHTH NEW YORK CAVALRY ROCHESTER REGIMENT." 
CHAPMAN S BRIOADK -WILSON S DIVISION -CAVALRY CORPS A. P. 



(1) COL. SAMUEL J. CROOKS. 

(2) COL. BENJAMIN F. DAVIS. OT. #., B. *. (Killed). 
(S) COL. WILLIAM L. MARK ELL. 



(4) COL. WILLIAM II HKN.IAMIN; BVT. Biil(i.-OK. 
(5)Coi.. EDMUND II. POPE ; BVT. BKID.-CRN. 



COMPANIES. 


KlI.I.ED AND DlKI) OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACX-IDENTH, IN I HINON, &.K. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


( >fficers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( XlU-ers. 


Men. 


Total. 




I 



I 
I 

2 

4 

I 



2 



I 

I 






10 

*3 

7 

IO 

8 

5 
4 
7 
7 
6 
6 
8 


I 
10 

M 
8 
I 2 
12 
6 

4 
9 

7 
7 

7 
8 


I 




I 





2 



I 






1 

2 5 
26 

9 
16 

i? 
5 

10 
21 
IO 

*7 
II 

I 2 


2 

25 
26 

2O 

1 6 

7 
5 

I 2 
21 
I I 

I? 

T I 

I 2 


28 
224 
229 
209 

201 
185 

I2 5 
i75 

33 
182 

140 

I2 5 
132 




B 


C . 


I). 


E . 


F 


G. 


H. 


T 


K. 


L 


M 


Totals 


14 


9 1 


I0 5 


5 


200 


2O5 


2,088 





Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 52. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Winchester Va. May 24 1862 2 

Snickersville, Va. Oct. 27 1862.... I 

Barbee s X Roads, Va., Nov. 5, 1862 i 

Sulphur Springs. Va. Nov. 8, 1862. i 

Amissville, Va., Nov 10 1862 I 

Jefferson, Va., Nov 14 1862 i 

Dumfries, Va. March 2, 1863 i 

Independence, Va., March 4, 1863. 2 

Beverly Ford, Va., June 9. 1863... 17 

Gettysburg, Pa., July I, 1863 6 

Williamsport, Md., July 6, 1863. ... 2 

Boonsboro, Md,. July 8, 1863 5 

Funkstown, Md., July 10, 1863.... i 

Chester Gap, Va., July 21, 1863. ... 2 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Brandy Station, Va., Aug. i, 1863. . 3 

In Action, Va. Oct. 10, 1863 i 

Stevensburg. Va.. Oct. n, 1863 3 

Culpeper, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 I 

Oak Grove, Va.. Oct. 15, 1863 i 

Barnet s Ford, Va., Feb. 6, 1864. . . 2 

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 5, 1864.. 2 

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 7, 1864. . i 

Yellow Tavern, Va., May n, 1864 i 

Meadow Bridge, Va., May 13 1864 2 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 2 1864. ... 3 

White Oak Swamp, Va.. June 13. 64 3 

Nottoway C. H., Va. June 23, 1864 7 

Ream s Station, Va., June 29, 1864. 3 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Kearneysville, Va., Aug. 26, 1864. . 2 

Snicker s Gap, Va., Sept. 17, 1864. . 2 

Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 

Columbia Furnace, Va. Oct. 7, 64 i 

Mount Olive, Va., Oct 9, 1864 I 

Middletown, Va.. Nov. 12, 1864 I 

Waynesboro, Va., March 2, 1865. . . i 

Ashland, Va., March 15, 1865 i 

Five Forks, Va., April I, 1865 6 

Deep Creek, Va. April :. 1865 I 

Xamozine Church, Va., April 3 65. 3 

Appomattox Station, Va. Apl. 8 65 3 

Picket Line. Va 2 

Place unknown - 2 



NOTES. The above enrollment does not include the three new companies (K, L, and M) which joined in 
April, 1865, at the close of the war. The regiment was organized at Rochester in November, 1861, having been 
recruited in that city and in its vicinity. On arriving at Washington it was assigned to Banks s Corps, and was 
under fire, for the first time, at Winchester, May 25, 1862, where five dismounted companies were engaged. 
During the Antietam campaign it served in Pleasanton s Cavalry Division, having previously distinguished itself by 
its escape from Harper s Ferry by passing through the besieging lines at night, and capturing some of the enemy s 
trains while on the way. It fought under Pleasanton in the famous cavalry battle at Beverly Ford, where it sus 
tained the heaviest loss of any regiment on the field, its casualties amounting to 12 killed, 31 wounded, and 7 
missing. Colonel Davis was killed in a personal encounter in this action. At Gettysburg the Eighth fought in 
Gamble s Brigade, Buford s Division the brigade which opened that historic battle. During Sheridan s raids 
and the Shenandoah campaign, in 1864, the regiment served in Wilson s (3d) Division. This division was com 
manded by General Custer in the final campaign of 1865. 



186 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TENTH NEW YORK CAVALRY --" PORTER GUARD." 
DAVIES S BRIGADE GREGG S DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS, A. P. 



(1) COL JOHN C. LEMMON. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM IRVINE. 



(3) COL. M. II. AVERT ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


I 
I 

I 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 



I 




9 

7 
1 1 

12 

6 
8 

9 

7 
7 

7 
8 

2 


I 
IO 

7 
1 1 

13 

6 

9 

IO 

8 
8 
8 
8 

3 





I 









I 

IO 

15 

7 
7 
H 
9 
IS 

21 
14 

18 

IO 

7 


I 
IO 

16 

7 
7 
M 
9 
IS 

21 
M 

18 

IO 

7 


21 
171 
1 88 

161 

5 2 
1 60 

167 
162 
187 
1 66 

r 5 

i55 
189 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K. 


L 


M 


Totals 


9 


93 


IO2 


I 


148 


149 


2,029 





Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 28. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Leesburg, Va.. Sept. 17, 1862 i 

Beverly Ford, Va. . June 9, 1863. . . 6 

Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863. . 5 

Middleburg, Va., June 26, 1863. ... i 

Gettysburg Pa , July 2, 1863 3 

Shepherdstown, Va., July 16. 1863. 2 

Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 4 

Auburn, Va., Oct. 14, 1863 2 

Bristoe Station. Va.,Oct. 14 1863. . 2 

Morrisville, Va. April 17. 1864.... 2 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 8, 1864. . 3 

Near Richmond, Va., May 12, 1864 3 

Hawes s Shop, Va., May 28, 1864. . 17 

Trevilian Station, Va., June n, 1864 7 

Kingand Queen C.H., June 24,1864 2 

St. Mary s Church, Va.. June 24, 64 7 

Deep Bottom, Va. , July 29, 1864.. . 2 

Lee s Mills, Va., July 3i : 1864 2 

Ream s Station, Va., Aug. 25, 1864. 2 

Poplar Spring Church, Va.,Oct. 1/64 5 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Boydton Road. Va. Oct. 27, 1864.. 6 

Prince George C.H.,Va. .Nov. 2, 1864 i 

Disputanta Station, Va.,Nov. 18, 64 3 

Stony Creek Station, Va., Dec. 1,1864 3 

Hatcher s Run, Va., Feb. 6, 1865 . . i 

Dinwiddie C. H.,Va., March 31,1865 2 

Sailor s Creek, Va.. April 6. 1865. . 3 

Farmville, Va.. April 7 1865 i 

On Picket, Va 2 

Place unknown. . 2 



Present, also, at several other engagements in which it lost men, wounded or captured, but none killed. 

NOTES. Organized at Elmira during the fall of 1861, from companies recruited in the counties of Chemung, 
Chenango, Cortland, Erie, Fulton, Onondaga and Steuben. During the winter of 1861-2 the regiment was sta 
tioned at Gettysburg. It was mounted during the summer of 1862, and commenced active service in the 
Manassas campaign of that year. It served in Bayard s Brigade at Fredericksburg, and participated in the 
Stoneman Raid of the Chancellorsville campaign, at which time it was in the Second Cavalry Division (General 
D. M. Gregg s), and in which it served until the close of the war. General Crook commanded this division in 
the final campaign, 1865. The brigade was commanded by General J. I. Gregg, but in May, 1864, the regiment 
was transferred to the First Brigade, General H. E. Davies, Jr. The regiment encountered its hardest fighting at 
Hawes s Shop (or Hanovertown) where it lost 13 killed, 27 wounded, and 2 missing; total, 42. At Beverly 
Ford (or Brandy Station) it lost 3 killed, 18 wounded, and 61 captured or missing; at Middleburg, 3 killed, 10 
wounded, and 19 missing ; at Trevilian Station, 4 killed, and 16 wounded ; and at Boydton Road, 6 killed and 1 1 
wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick Tremain, a young and promising officer, was killed at Hatcher s Run. 
The regiment was consolidated June 17, 1865, with the Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry, forming the First Pro 
visional Cavalry, The latter regiment was mustered out a month later. 



THKEK HUNDRED FIGHTING RKOJIMKNTS. 



SEVENTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
RKOOKK S BRIGADE -- BARLOW S DIVISION --SECOND CORPS, 



(1) COL. LEWIS O. MORRIS, B. *. (Killed). (2) COL. EDWARD A. SI RINGSTKKD 

(8) COL. RICHARD C. DI RYKA, rffl. p.. B. . 



COM PAN I KM. 


KILLED AND DIED of WOI-NDS. 


DIED op DISEAHE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IIIHON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 




2 

I 
2 






24 
22 

35 
29 

22 

27 

19 

25 
22 

21 

18 

13 


3 
24 
22 

36 
30 

23 
2 9 

2O 

26 

2 3 

22 

2O 
3 





I 






I 



I 



I 




32 
2 9 

3 
29 

40 

39 

2 7 
16 

33 
49 

3 
20 




3 2 
29 

3 1 
29 

40 

39 

27 

!/ 

33 
5 

3 

ji 


21 
2 4 2 
246 
2 3 I 
207 
208 
219 

2 55 
194 

25 J 
229 

I 80 
184 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


I 4 277 


2 9 I 


4 


374 


373 


2,667 





2qi killed 10.9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 806 ; missing and captured, 542 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 204. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 13 

Milford Station, Va 2 

North Anna, Va 4 

Picket, Va., May 28, 1864 i 

Totopotomoy, Va 28 

Cold Harbor, Va 127 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 20 

Petersburg, Va., June 16 55 



BATTLES. K. <fc M.W. 

Petersburg, Va., June 17-19.. 7 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Jerusalem Road, Va 3 

Strawberry Plains, Va 3 

Deep Bottom, Va 6 

Ream s Station, Va 15 

Picket, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 i 



NOTES. Recniited and organized at Albany as the One Hundred and Thirteenth New York Infantry. It 
moved to Washington, August 19, 1862, where it was immediately assigned to duty in the forts near the city. In 
December following it was changed to a heavy artillery command, and the two additional companies which became 
necessary by reason of the change were recruited, Company L joining the regiment in August, 1863, and Com 
pany M in January, 1864. The Seventh remained on garrison duty in various forts near Washington until May 
15, 1864, when it was ordered to the front to serve as infantry. It marched out of Washington with 67 officers, 6 
non-commissioned staff, and 1,768 muskets, joining Grant s Army on May lyth, at Spotsylvania. It was assigned 
to Tyler s Division, but was transferred, a few days later, to Barlow s splendid division, and at one time in 
September, 1864 it was attached to the famous Irish Brigade. It served with Barlow until February 22, 
1865, when it was withdrawn from the front, and ordered to Baltimore, where it garrisoned Fort McHenry 
until after the close of the war. During its first hundred days of service in the field from Spotsylvania to 
Ream s Station the Seventh lost 1,254 in killed, wounded, and missing. The casualties at Cold Harbor, including 
the loss in the trenches, amounted to 45 killed, 259 wounded, and 114 missing; total, 418. Colonel Morris was 
killed there, the day after the assault, while passing along the trenches. He was an officer of the Regular Army, 
and a son of the Captain Morris who was killed at Monterey. 



188 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



EIGHTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
TYLER S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS, 



(1) COLONEL PETER A. PORTER (Killed). 

(2) COLONEL WILLARD W. BATES (Killed). 



(3) COLONEL JAMES M. WILLET . 

(4) COLONEL JOEL B. BAKER. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIKIJ OK WOUNDS. 


DIED op DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 
I 
I 

2 
2 



4 
i 

i 

i 



3 


I 

20 

55 
37 
26 

34 
18 

12 

3 2 
21 

26 
2O 
4 


4 

21 
56 

39 

28 

34 

22 

13 

3 2 
22 

2 7 
2O 

43 





I 

I 

I 



I 




2 3 
26 

2 3 

16 

28 

3 
3 
19 

25 
26 

34 
18 


* 

2 3 
26 

2 3 

16 

29 
3 
3 1 

20 

2 5 
26 

35 
18 


1 9 

2IO 

237 
217 

2O2 
224 

225 
209 

21 5 

197 

204 
203 
213 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


*9 


342 


361 


4 


298 


3 02 


2,575 





361 killed=i4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 1,010 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 102. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 19, 1864 10 

North Anna, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 207 

Petersburg Assault, Va 42 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 34 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 16 

Deep Bottom, Va 4 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Ream s Station, Va 24 

Boydton Road, Va 13 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 i 

Dabney s Mills, Va 2 

White Oak Poad, Va 2 

Picket, Va., Feb. 8, 1865 i 



By Prison Guards > 3 

Present, also, at Totopotomoy ; High Bridge ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Lockport in August, 1862, as the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Infantry, the men 
coming from Niagara, Orleans, and Genesee counties. It was changed to heavy artillery in December, 1862, 
and two additional companies were added in January, 1864. The regiment performed garrison duty until May, 
1864, when it was sent with the other heavy artillery commands to the front to reinforce General Grant. It was 
in action for the first time at Spotsylvania, Va., May 19, 1864, where it lost 8 killed, 21 wounded, and 4 missing. 
At Cold Harbor the Eighth lost 80 killed, 339 wounded, and 86 missing; total, 505 --it having twelve large 
companies engaged there. In that battle Colonel Porter led the regiment in its grand charge upon the enemy s 
works, and fell dead in the extreme advance. Eight officers were killed in that action. 

In the assault on Petersburg the regiment made another gallant attack on the Confederate lines, in which Col. 
Bates and Major Blake fell mortally wounded. In the actions around Petersburg, June 15-23, 1864, the regiment lost 
42 killed, 26 1 wounded, and 5 missing ; total, 308. Though known as an artillery regiment, the men carried rifles, and 
were drilled as infantry. When they took the field, their full ranks twelve companies of 150 men each ^made 
them a very efficient organization, but their heavy losses in action soon reduced their long lines, until but few 
were left to witness the last fight at Appomattox. During all its service in the field, in i864_ 65, the regiment 
was attached to the Second Division (Gibbon s) of the Second Corps. 



TlIKEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



NINTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

SMITH S BRIGADE - UICKKTTS S J)i VISION - SIXTH CORPS. 



(J) COL. JOSEPH WELLING. 

(2) COL. WILLIAM H. SEWAKI), JR.; BVT. BUIG.-GEN. 



(8) COL. EDWIN P. TAKT. 
(4) COL. J. W. NNYDKK. 



COM PA .M EH. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DlKDOr DlKEAME, AccllIKNTM, IN I lllHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( > (fleers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


. 

I 



2 

I 

I 



I 


5 7 
9 
9 
18 

28 
3 

10 

16 

9 
28 

10 

1 1 




7 
2O 

19 

1 8 

3 
4 
10 

16 

9 
29 

10 

12 


I 



2 










I 

3 
IO 

3 2 

23 

26 

IO 

18 

M 
16 

35 
i? 

22 


2 

3 

IO 

32 

23 

28 

IO 

18 

14 
16 

35 
i? 

22 


9 

3*3 
214 

242 
226 

270 
264 

247 
286 
227 
262 
321 
336 


Comoany - \ 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


6 


198 


2O4 


3 


2 54 


257 


3.227 





Total of killed and wounded, 824 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 41. 



BATTLK*. K.&M.W. 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 4 

Sailor s Creek, Va i 

On Picket, Va 2 

Place unknown 2 



Charlestown ; Halltown ; Smithfield ; Hatcher s Run ; 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Cold Harbor, Va. (8 Cos.) 43 

Monocacy, Md. (8 Cos.) 51 

Opequon, Va. (8 Cos.) 22 

Cedar Creek, Va 64 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 15 

Present, also, at Fort Stevens ; Snicker s Gap ; 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized, originally, as the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Infantry. It was recruited in Cayuga 
and Wayne counties, and left Auburn on September 12, 1862. While stationed in the fortifications about 
Washington it was changed to heavy artillery November 9, 1862, and two additional companies, L and M, were 
added. Company M was organized originally at Lockport, N. Y., in October, 1862, as the Twenty-second I-ight 
Battery, and was transferred to the Ninth in February, 1863 ; Company L was organized in 1863, and joined the 
regiment in December of that year. During its stay within the defences of Washington the Ninth built Fort 
Simmons, Mansfield, Bayard, Gaines, and Foote. On May 18, 1864, the regiment left Alexandria, Va., for the 
front, where it was assigned, soon after its arrival, to Colonel B. F. Smith s (31!) Brigade, Ricketts s (3d) Division, 
Sixth Corps. With the Sixth Corps it took part in the storming of the earthworks at Cold Harbor, its first 
experience under fire. Only two battalions were engaged there, the Third Battalion, under Major Snycler Cos. 
G, I, L and F having been ordered on detached service with the artillery brigade ; the other two battalions were 
armed and drilled as infantry. Loss at Cold Harbor, 16 killed, 126 wounded, and 6 missing ; total, 148. The 
Third Battalion did not rejoin the regiment until October 3, 1864, the other eight companies, in the meanwhile, 
having fought in the bloody battles of the Monocacy and the Opequon. At Cedar Creek the three battalions 
were again united, the gallant bearing of the regiment in that battle evoking special mention in the official report 
of the division-general. It lost in that action, 43 killed and 165 wounded ; total, 208. At the Opequon it lost 
6 killed and 36 wounded. 



190 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAK. 



FOURTEENTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. 
MARSHALL S BRIGADE LEDLIE S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



COLONEL ELISHA G. MARSHALL, OS. p., K. S.; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff 


I 



I 
I 

I 
I 




18 

J 5 
18 

i? 
ii 

22 
2O 
II 

2 5 
2O 

18 

25 


I 

18 

15 

J 9 

I? 
1 1 

2 3 

20 
II 

25 
21 

19 

26 







I 

I 




I 
28 

18 

22 
28 

18 

2 3 
20 

19 

39 

28 

2 3 

3 2 


I 
28 

18 

22 
28 

18 

23 
21 

19 

4 

28 

2 3 
3 2 


19 

211 

195 

215 
230 

192 
2IO 
2O2 
198 
230 
2O2 
I 9 I 
211 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


6 


220 


226 


2 


299 


301 


2,506 





Total of killed and wounded, 861 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 84. 
BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



Wilderness, Va i 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 6 

North Anna, Va 

Bethesda Church, Va. 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864 43 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, June 17, 1864) 57 



Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Va 22 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 30 

Weldon Railroad, Va 15 

Peebles s Farm, Va 7 

Fort Stedman, Va 26 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 5 



Present, also, at Ny River ; Totopotomoy ; Boydton Road ; Hatcher s Pun. 

NOTES. Organized at Rochester, N. Y., the men having been recruited mostly in Monroe, Yates, St. Law 
rence and Jefferson counties. Although the recruiting commenced in June, 1863, the regiment did not complete 
its organization until January 4, 1864. It garrisoned the forts in New York Harbor until April 23, 1864, when it 
was ordered to the front, and was assigned to the Ninth Corps, joining it at Warrenton, Va. On May 2, 1864, it 
started for the Rapidan. The regiment was in line at the Wilderness, but was only partially engaged. It was 
actively engaged, however, the next week, at Spotsylvania (then in Stevenson s (ist) Division), and two weeks 
later suffered heavily at Cold Harbor, where it lost 15 killed, 43 wounded, and 16 missing. On June 17, 1864, 
the Fourteenth distinguished itself by its brilliant and successful charge on the works at Petersburg ; loss, 38 
killed, 152 wounded, 60 missing; total, 250. Major Job C. Hedges was killed in this charge while bravely 
leading his battalion. At the Mine Explosion the regiment was selected to lead the assault at the Crater, and 
was the first to plant its colors on the enemy s works, where it captured a Confederate flag. Its casualties in this 
action were 10 killed, 44 wounded, and 78 missing; total, 132. The Fourteenth was on duty in the trenches, 
losing men daily in the constant and deadly firing which prevailed there. It also occupied Fort Stedman at the 
time of the Confederate sortie, March 25, 1865, and when surrounded there by the enemy, the men of the Four 
teenth fought their way through the opposing lines until they reached Fort Haskell, where, in company with the 
remainder of the regiment which was on duty there, they succeeded in holding that important position. At the 
Weldon Railroad the regiment was in White s (ist) Division, and sustained a loss of 6 killed, 40 wounded and 3 
missing ; total, 49. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



191 



FIFTH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"DURYEE ZOUAVES." 
WARREN S BRIGADE SYKKS S DIVISION -- FIFTH CORPS. 



(!) COL. ABRAM DURYEE; BVT. MAJOH-GBN. U. S. V. 

(*) COL G. K. WAIWEN. OT.fl., B. *.; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. U. 8. A. 



(3) COL. HIRAM DURYEA ; BVT. Bnio.-GEN. U. 8. V. 

(4) Cou CLEVELAND WINBLOW (Killed). 



COMPANIES. 



KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 



Officers. 



Men. 



Total. 



DIED or DIXEAHE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IIIWON. &c. 



| Hirers. 



Mon. 



Total. 



Total 

Kiirolliiu-iit 



Field and Staff i i 

Company A 10 10 . 3 ^ I4 8 

JJ " " 44 157 

- 16 16 . 146 

- IQ 2I 2 2 149 

2 20 5 5 54 

1? 2 2 147 

I 19 20 . 2 2 152 

. 10 10 . i i 139 

7 18 . 3 3 ,52 

. . 4 4 148 

Totals 6 171 177 34 34 

177 killed - 11.7 per cent. 
BATTLES. KILLED. WOUNDED. MIBSINU. TOTAL 

Big Bethel, Va 6 13 .. 19 

Siege of Yorktown, Va 2 . . 2 

Gaines s Mill, Va 3 8 no 14 162 

Manassas, Va 79 i ?0 4 8 297 

Shepherdstown Ford, Va x . . i 

Fredericksburg, Va 2 3 15 

Chancellorsville, Va 2 i 

Totals 123 300 66 489 

Present, also, at Hanover Court House ; Seven Days ; Malvern Hill ; Antietam. 

NOTES. Conspicuous, not only, by its gay uniform, but by its precision of drill and steady bearing under 
fire. General Sykes once wrote that it was the best volunteer organization he ever saw. During all its active 
service the Fifth was in the Division of Regulars, and fully maintained its standing and right to be there. In 
addition to the great Generals who had served successively as its Colonels, the regiment graduated other noted 
ones. Generals Kilpatrick, Davies, and Hamblin having served in its line. Kilpatrick was seriously wounded at 
Big Bethel while a captain in the Fifth. The regiment was recruited in New York City, and was one of the first 
to respond to the alarm of war. At Gaines s Mill, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hiram Duryca, it faced 
a musketry fire which cut down one -third of its men, and won praises from all who witnessed its remarkable 
efficiency and drill while in the thickest of that fight ; it was in that battle that, after having received several 
deadly volleys, it paused at one time while still under fire to "count off" anew, so that its movements might not 
be deranged by the absence of its fallen men. At Manassas it took 490 into action, of whom 1 1 7 were killed or 
mortally wounded. The Fifth was enlisted for two years ; but most of its recruits were enlisted for three years, 
and when the regiment was mustered out (May 14, 1863) these men were transferred to the One Hundred and 
Forty-sixth New York. After the muster-out of the Fifth, Colonel Winslow organized another regiment which 
bore the same number, and which rejoined the Fifth Corps, sharing the fortunes of Grant s army from the 
North Anna to Appomattox. Colonel Winslow fell mortally wounded at Bethesda Church, while in command 
of this regiment, and Colonel Frederick Winthrop, who succeeded him, was killed at Five Forks while in com 
mand of the brigade. 



192 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

FORTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY " MOZART REGIMENT." 
WARD S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL EDWARD HILEY. (2) COL. THOMAS W. EGAN ; BVT MAJOR-GEN. (3) COL. MADISON M. CANNON. 

Losses. Officers. En, Men. 

Killed and mortally wounded 10 228 238 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 2 125 127 

Died in Confederate prisons 45 45 



Totals 12 398 410 



Battles, Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Siege of Yorktown, Va 4 3 . . 7 

Williamsburg, Va 5 24 . . 29 

Fair Oaks, Va 12 81 3 96 

On Picket, Va., June 9, 1862 2 . . . . 2 

Oak Grove, Va i i 2 

Seven Days Battles, Va 3 18 79 100 

Manassas, Va 8 60 1 8 86 

Chantilly, Va 4 47 10 61 

Fredericksburg, Va 19 74 30 123 

Chanceilorsville, Va i 40 29 70 

Gettysburg, Pa 23 120 7 150 

Kelly s Ford, Va 4 . . 4 

Mine Run, Va i 19 . . 20 

Wilderness, Va 20 156 37 213 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 1 57 28 96 

North Anna and Totopotomoy, Va 4 24 21 49 

Cold Harbor, Va 3328 

Petersburg, Va., June 18,1864 14 29 2 45 

Strawberry Plains, Va. (six co s), July 27, 1864 2 . . 2 

Poplar Spring Church, Va i . . i 

Boydton Road, Va i 7 . . 8 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March, 1865 i 3 4 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 34 i 41 

"Includes the mortally wounded, tlneludes the captured. 

Totals 142 807 268 1,217 

Present, also, at Glendale ; Malvern Hill ; Po River ; Deep Bottom ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 
NOTES. Four companies of this regiment were raised in Massachusetts, but the quota of that State being 
full, these companies joined the Fortieth. It sustained an unusual loss in battle, and in its number of killed stands 
next to the head in the list of New York infantry regiments. It carried, from first to last, a large number of names 
on its rolls, owing to accessions and transfers from other regiments. The Eighty-seventh New York was transferred 
entire in September, 1862 ; five companies of three years men from the Thirty-eighth New York were received 
in May, 1863 ; also, the reenlisted men and recruits of the Thirty-seventh, and Seventy-fourth New York Volun 
teers, when those regiments returned home. While on the Peninsula, the division was commanded by Kearny, 
and the brigade by General Birney. At Fair Oaks, under command of Colonel Egan, five companies numbering 
231 officers and men were hotly engaged, every man in the color-guard falling, either killed or wounded. The 
original members of the regiment were mustered out in July, 1864, and the reonlisted veterans and recruits were 
formed into a battalion of six companies which served through the war. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 193 

FORTY-SECOND NEW YORK INFANTKY - -"TAMMANY KEGIMENT." 
HALL S BRIGADE-- GIBBON S DIVISION --SECOND Corn s. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM I). KEXXEDY (I)ied). < 3) <.-,. EDMl M) ( CII MM KS 

(3) COL MILTOX COGSWELL. HI. {J . U ^. .4, Col . JAMKs K MALLON (Kllle<l 

(5) C<.i.. WILLIAM A. LYNCH. 



Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 11 |^| , r 2 

Died of disease, accidents, etc , , 68 69 

Died in Confederate prisons 35 

Totals 12 244 256 



Total enrollment, 1,210. killed, 152, percentage, 12.6. 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* .I/iwim .f Total. 

Ball s Bluff, Va 7 /-, , 2O , 33 

Siege of Yorktown, Va i . . . . i 

Fair Oaks, Va j . , j 

TunstalPs Station, Va . . 9 9 

Glendale, Va 5 24 27 56 

Malvern Hill, Va , . . . . , 

Antietam, Md 35 , 2 y 19 181 

Fredericksburg, Va i ^ 3 22 

Fredericksburg, Va. ( 1 863 ) 9 . . t j 

Gettysburg, Pa 1 5 55 4 74 

Bristoe Station, Va 4 14 1 28 

Mine Run, Va . . 3 

Wilderness, Va 8 15 . . 23 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 28 9 49 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 19 2 25 

Petersburg, Va n 92 103 

Includes the mortally wounded. ^Includes the captured. 

Totals 92 328 298 718 

Present, also, at Seven Days Battles ; North Anna ; Totopotomoy. 

NOTES. --This regiment was organized by the "Tammany General Committee," under the patronage of the 
Tammany Society of New York City. It was mustered in June 22, 1861, and on the i8th of July, following, 
went to Washington, 1,019 strong. Colonel Kennedy died on the 22cl and was succeeded by Colonel Cogswell. 
The regiment was assigned, October 15, 1861, to Gorman s Brigade, Stone s Division, and was engaged at Ball s 
Bluff, its first experience under fire, where three of the officers were killed. At Antietam then in Dana s (3d) 
Brigade, Sedgwick s ( 2d) Division, Second Corps the Forty-second charged with Sedgwick into the woods around 
the Dunker Church, where it lost 181 out of the 345 who were engaged. At Gettysburg, under command of Col 
onel Mallon (Hall s Brigade, Gibbon s Division), the regiment took a conspicuous and meritorious part in the repulse 
of Pickett s charge. Colonel Mallon was an officer of recognized merit and gallantry, and received frequent mention 
in the official reports of every action in which he was engaged. He was killed at Bristoe Station. During the 
Wilderness campaign the Forty-second fought in Webb s Brigade, Gibbon s Division, and its depleted ranks were 
again thinned by the desperate fighting encountered there. The gallant old regiment was mustered out July 13, 
1864, its term of enlistment having expired, and such of its members as had rei-nlistcd, together with the recruits, 
were transferred to the Eighty-second New York. During its entire service it fought in the Second Division of 
the Second Corps. 
13 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

FORTY-THIRD NEW YORK INFANTRY- - "ALBANY RIFLES." 
NEILL S BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. FRANCIS L. VINTON, ME. P.. J3. <3. ; BRIG-GEN. (3) COL. JOHN WILSON (Killed). 

(2) COL. BENJAMIN F. BAKER ; BVT. MA.IOK-GEN. (4) COL. CHARLES A. MILLIKEN. 

Lasses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed or mortally wounded 13 no 123 

Died of disease, accidents, etc i 93 94 

Died in Confederate prisons 27 27 



Totals 14 230 244 



Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Yorktown, Va i 5 . . 6 

Seven Days Battle, Va 2 40 29 71 

Antietam, Md i . . i 

Fredericksburg, Va i i o i 12 

Marye s H eights, Va 15 51 . . 66 

Salem Church, Va 4 n 123 138 

Gettysburg, Pa 2 2 i 5 

Bristoe Station, Va 2 i 3 

Rappahannock Station, Va 4 6 . . 10 

Wilderness, Va 21 106 71 198 

Spotsylvania, Va 4 34 13 51 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 10 .. 12 

Fort Stevens, D. C 7 29 . . 36 

Opequon, Va 2 6 . . 8 

Fisher s Hill, Va. (battalion) 2 5 .. 7 

Cedar Creek, Va. (battalion) 4 18 .. 22 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 13 2 19 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 3 1 1 i 15 

Petersburg, Va., April 2, j 865 2 10 .. 12 

*Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 80 370 242 692 

Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Golding s Farm ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; 
Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Forty- third was a fighting regiment, and was known as such throughout the corps and at home. 
It was assigned to Hancock s Brigade, W. F. Smith s Division, and participated with that command in its brilliant 
manoeuvre at Williamsburg. It was selected as one of the five crack regiments to form the famous Light Division 
of the Sixth Corps, the division which took such a prominent part in the successful storming of Marye s Heights. 
Soon after this battle the Light Division was discontinued, and the Forty-third was placed in the Third Brigade 
(Second Division), in which it remained without further change. The three field officers, Col. Wilson, Lieut. -Col. 
Fryer, and Major Wallace, were killed at the Wilderness. At Spotsylvania the regiment, though thinned and shat 
tered, was one of the twelve picked battalions which Upton led in his historic charge, in which the Forty-third with 
its usual dash captured some of the enemy s flags, Captain Burhans falling dead with two stands of colors in his 
hands. The Third Brigade General Bidwell commanding bore almost the entire brunt of the battle at Fort 
Stevens, Washington, where the Forty-third fought under the approving eye of the President, and helped to save 
the Capital from Early s invading army. Lieut. -Col. Visscher was killed in this action, and every regimental com 
mandant in the brigade was killed or wounded. 



THREE HUNDRED FKJHTING RECJLMKXTS. 



FORTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"ELLSWORTH S AVENGERS." 
BAKTLETT S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION -- FIFTH ( OKI S. 



(I) COL. STEPHEN W. STKYKEK 



(3) COL JAM&S KICK; BKIU.-UKN., (Killed). 



\\ < ONNKH 



< M r \ S It - 


KILLED AXL DIEC <>* WOITNUS. j DIKD or DIPKAHK, ACOIDKNTK, [N I uiaox, ,t<-. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officer*. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Field and Staff 





i 



i 






i 
I 




28 

M 

18 

13 

18 

20 

21 
17 
13 

16 




28 

5 
18 

4 
1 8 

20 
2 I 

7 
M 
17 







* 





2 


I 
>4 

7 

s 

16 

M 
16 

16 

J 3 

3 
10 


I 

4 
1? 

5 
16 

4 
16 
16 

3 
3 

I 2 


1 5 
.58 

144 

37 
162 

5 2 
1 66 

182 
161 
56 
5 2 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


4 


178 


182 


2 145 


47 


5 8 5 





182 killed == I 1.4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded. 643 , total of missing and captured, 79 ; died in Confederate prisons, io. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Yorktown, Va i 

Hanover C. H., Va 34 

Gaines s Mill, Va 17 

Malvern Hill, Va 21 

Manassas, Va 13 

Fredericksburg, Va 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Middleburg, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 36 

Present, also, at Seven Days ; Antietam ; Shepherdstown ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; VVeldon Road. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Rappahannock Station, Va 3 

Wilderness, Va 12 

Spotsylvania, Va 21 

North Anna, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 6 

Petersburg, Va 5 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 2 

Place unknown i 



NOTES. The enlisted men in this regiment were the finest of any in the service. They were recmited 
from every county in the State, in conformity to requirements calling for unmarried, able-bodied men, not over 
thirty years of age, not under five feet eight inches in height, and of good moral character. The men were of a 
high order of intelligence, and when the regiment was organized it was found that the average age was twenty-two, 
and the average height five feet ten and one-half inches. The men wore a zouave uniform during the first year 
of their service. At Hanover Court House, its first battle, the Forty-fourth made a gallant fight, losing 27 killed 
and 59 wounded; at Gaines s Mill Lieutenant-Colonel Rice commanding --it lost 5 killed, 22 wounded, and 
29 missing ; and at Malvern Hill, it killed, 84 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 225 who were engaged. The 
regiment was then in Butterfield s Brigade of Morell s (ist) Division. Two new companies (C and E) joined 
in October, 1862 (one of them composed of students from the State Normal School at Albany), and took the 
place of two companies which had been consolidated with the others. At Gettysburg, then in Vincent s Hrig- 
ade, Barnes s Division, the Forty-fourth was one of the first regiments to seize and hold Little Round Top, 
meeting its greatest loss there; casualties, 20 killed, 82 wounded, and 3 missing; total, 111. At Manassas, 
Major Freeman Conner commanding, the regiment lost 5 killed, 48 wounded, and 18 missing, out of 12 officers 
and 148 men in action ; at the Wilderness, it lost 4 killed and 63 wounded ; and at Spotsylvania, 8 killed, 48 
wounded, and 9 missing. Mustered out September 24, 1864. 



196 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FORTY-EIGHTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
BARTON S BRIGADE --TURNER S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES H. PERRY, D. D. (Died). (2) COL. WILLIAM B. BARTON ; BVT. BEIQ.-GEN. (3) COL. WILLIAM B. COAN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 

2 

I 

4 

2 
I 
T 



I 
2 

2 


2 
23 

J 9 
29 

24 
18 

T 9 
17 

22 
IO 

35 


4 

2 5 
2O 

33 
26 

T 9 

20 

17 

2 3 
12 

37 


I 







I 


* 






!3 
12 

12 

J 7 

.14 

1 1 

!5 

16 
1 1 

10 


I 

*3 
12 

12 

J 7 

M 
12 

J 5 
16 
1 1 

IO 


J 9 
223 

2I 5 

229 

214 
202 
224 
227 
206 
205 
209 




B . 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G . 


H. 


T , 


K 


Totals 


18 


218 


236 


2 


!3 


*33 


2,173 





236 killed=io.8 per cent. 
Wounded in addition to the above, 623 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 44. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 17 

Petersburg Mine, Va 1 1 

Petersburg Trenches, Va i o 

Deep Bottom, Va 6 

Strawberry Plains, Va., August 16, 1864 10 

Hatcher s Run, Va 2 

Fort Fisher, N. C 4 

Wilmington, N. C 4 

By Prison Guard i 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Bluffton, S. C i 

Morris Island, S. C 8 

Fort Wagner, S. C 83 

Sanderson, Fla . . i 

Olustee, Fla 47 

On Picket, Fla i 

Chester Heights, Va 7 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 22 

Bermuda Hundred, Va i 

Present, also, at Fort Pulaski ; Tybee Island ; Skull Creek ; Coosahatchie River ; Proctor s Creek ; Chaffin s 
Farm ; Darbytown Road ; Fair Oaks ( 1 864) ; Fort Anderson. 

NOTES. Organized and commanded by Rev. James H. Perry, D. D., a Methodist clergyman, who had been 
educated at West Point, and had distinguished himself in the Mexican War. He commanded the regiment until 
June 1 8, 1862, when he died suddenly at Fort Pulaski. The Forty-eighth left Fort Hamilton, N. Y., on Septem 
ber 15, 1 86 1, and after a brief stay in Washington and Annapolis sailed, October 2ist, for Fort Monroe, where it 
joined General W. T. Sherman s Expedition to Hilton Head- Shortly after the fall of Fort Pulaski, the Forty- 
eighth was assigned to garrison duty in the fort where it remained for one year. At Fort Wagner, in company 
with Strong s Brigade, the regiment participated in that memorable assault, and succeeded in entering one of the 
strongest bastions. They held it several hours, but for want of support had to abandon their costly prize after 
losing 54 killed, 112 wounded, and 76 missing; total, 242. On February 20, 1864, the regiment fought at 
Olustee, Fla., where it sustained a loss of 47 killed,* 163 wounded, and 34 captured, and then sailed for Virginia, 
where it joined the Army of the James in the campaign before Richmond and Petersburg. In this campaign it 
served in the Second Brigade (Barton s), Second Division (Turner s), Tenth Corps. While at Cold Harbor the 
division was attached, temporarily, to the Eighteenth Corps. At Fort Fisher the regiment was in Pennypacker s 
(3d) Brigade, Ames s Division. The Forty-eighth lost 859 men, killed and wounded, during the terrible fight 
ing of the last twenty months of its service, - - a nobie record. 

"Including mortally wounded. 



TllKKK HUNDKKI) Kl(JHTIN(J JtKCJIMKNTS. 



FORTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY " SECOND BUFFALO." 
NEIL S BRIGADE -- GETTY S DIVISION- -SIXTH CORPS. 



(l)CoL. DANIEL P. BIWVKLL; HVT. BIUO.-OKN. (Killed). (2) Coi.. KKASTfS I). HOLT (Killed*. (8) Coi.. fJEOROE II. SELKIRK. 



COMPANIES. 


KlI.I.KI) AND PtKI) OF WOITNIW. 


I)IKI> or DIHKAHK, AIVIHKNT*. IN PIUHON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 

5 

121 
126 
I0 3 
56 

45 
117 

5 2 
i^3 
39 
I2 5 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 

i 
i 
i 
i 

2 
I 
2 



I 

I 




IO 
I 2 

5 

1 8 

i? 

I 2 

3 

5 
7 

7 


4 
I I 

U 

1 6 

9 
19 

3 
5 

5 
18 

8 


2 


1 







I 
I 




I 
29 
21 
12 

5 
10 

IO 

25 

18 
16 
i7 


3 

2 9 

22 
I 2 

15 
IO 

IO 

25 

9 

7 
7 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


J 5 


126 


141 


5 


74 


179 


1,312 





141 killed = 10.7 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 521 died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 24. 



BATTLES. K.&MW 

Spotsylvania, Va 52 

Cold Harbor, Va 5 

Fort Stevens, D. C 7 

Charlestown, W. Va . i 

Opequon, Va 3 

Cedar Creek, Va 1 1 

Petersburg, Va 3 

Place unknown 2 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Yorktown, Va., April 5, 1862 i 

Chickahominy, Va., June 27, 1862 i 

White Oak Swamp, Va i 

Antietam, Md 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1862) 2 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1863) 4 

On Picket, Pa., June 4, 1 863 i 

Fairfield, Pa i 

Wilderness, Va 39 

Present, also, at Dranesville ; Williamsburg ; Golding s Farm ; Malvern Hill ; Crampton s Pass ; Gettysburg ; 
Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Buffalo, September 18, 1861. The regiment arrived in Washington, September 21, 
1 86 1, and was assigned soon after to Davidson s Brigade, W. F. Smith s Division. In March, 1862, this division 
was placed in Keyes s (Fourth) Corps and accompanied it to the Peninsula; but on May 18, 1862, the division 
was detached and used in forming the Sixth Corps, in which command (Third Brigade, Second Division) the 
regiment served until the end of the war. Although the regiment participated in all the battles of the Army of 
the Potomac in 1862 and 1863, its losses were comparatively small until 1864, when it encountered some hard 
fighting and severe losses. The Forty-ninth started on Grant s Virginia campaign, May 4, 1864, with 384 men, 
losing at the Wilderness, 29 killed, 54 wounded, and 6 missing , and at Spotsylvania, 24 killed, 89 wounded, and 
1 8 missing. Among the killed in these battles were ten officers. At Spotsylvania the regiment behaved with 
especial gallantry, its percentage of loss in that battle being a remarkable one. Its term of service expired 
September i 7, 1864, while fighting in the Shenandoah Valley, and the remnant of the regiment went home. The 
rei : nlisted men and recruits with unexpired terms were left in the field and formed into a battalion of four com 
panies which served through the war. At Cedar Creek this battalion sustained a loss of 8 killed and 30 wounded. 
The Forty-ninth suffered a severe and unusual loss in the number of its field officers killed in action. Colonel 
Bidwell, who had been brevetted General, was killed at Cedar Creek ; Major Ellis was mortally wounded at 
Spotsylvania (shot with a ramrod) ; Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson was killed at Fort Stevens, while in command ; 
and Colonel Holt fell in the final and victorious assault at the fall of Petersburg. 



198 EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

FIFTY-FIRST NEW YORK INFANTRY -- "SHEPARD RIFLES." 
FERRERO S BRIGADE STURGIS S DIVISION -- NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWARD FERRERO ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. (3) COL. CHARLES W. LsGENDRE ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 

(2) COL. ROBERT B. TOTTER ; MAJOR-GEN. (4) COL. JOHN G. WRIGHT ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 











Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded ............................................ 9 T 93 202 

Died of disease, accidents, etc .......................................... 2 105 107 

Died in Confederate prisons .............................................. 69 69 

Totals ................................. _ii 367 378 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Roanoke Island, N. C ............................................ 3 I J 9 2 3 

New Berne, N. C ................................................ n 60 .. 71 

Manassas, Va .................................................... 10 49 17 76 

Chantilly, Va ...................................................... 8 5 13 

South Mountain, Md .............................................. 4 I2 l6 

Antietam, Md ................................................... 19 68 . . 87 

Fredericksburg, Va ............................................... 10 61 2 73 

Jackson, Miss ..................................................... i 

Knoxville, Tenn ................................................... i 

Wilderness, Va .................................................. 20 54 5 79 

Spotsylvania, Va ................................................. 1 1 32 43 

North Anna, Va .................................................... i i 

Bethesda Church, Va ............................................. 3 8 6 17 

Petersburg Mine, Va ............................................. 10 21 2 33 

Weldon Railroad, Va ............................................... i J 

Peebles s Farm, Va .............................................. 2 10 332 344 

Siege of Petersburg, Va ........................................... 21 73 4 98 

"Includes the mortally wounded. ^Includes the captured. 

Totals ................... 124 471 382 977 

Present, also, at Blue Springs, Tenn. ; Campbell s Station, Tenn. ; Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. ; Cold Harbor, 
Va. ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort Stedman, Va. ; Fall of Petersburg, Va. 

NOTES. Recruited in New York City, and formed by uniting the " Scott Rifles," two companies, and the 
"Union Rifles," two companies, with the Shepard Rifles. It was mustered in by companies from July 2 7 to 
October 23, 1861. In January, 1862, it embarked at Annapolis on the Burnside Expedition, having been assigned 
to Reno s Brigade. At the battle of New Berne it encountered the brunt of the fighting, and sustained the 
severest loss of any regiment in that action. During its subsequent service it was in the Second Division which 
was commanded, successively, by Reno, Sturgis, and Potter. The Fifty-first distinguished itself particularly at 
Antietam, where, under Colonel Potter, it supported the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, of the same brigade, in their 
desperate charge across the stone bridge, an action which forms one of the most brilliant episodes of the war. 
Following the fortunes of the Ninth Corps it served under Burnside on the Carolina coast, took part in Pope s 
Virginia campaign, fought under McClellan in Maryland, was present at the Siege of Vicksburg, participated in 
the fighting in East Tennessee, in the gallant defense of Knoxville, and then returned to Virginia in time to 
take part in Grant s campaigns of 1864 and the final triumphs of the following year. The regiment reenlisted 
in December, 1863, and in the following winter was recruited anew nearly to its maximum. During the campaigns 
of 1862-63 the regiment served in Ferrero s Brigade ; in the battles of 1864-65 it was in Curtin s (ist) Brigade, 
Potter s (2d) Division. The graves of the Fifty-first are scattered far and wide. Few regiments saw a more 
active service, and none left a more honorable record. 



THRKE HUNDKKD FIGHTING REGIMENTS. i 

FIFTY-SECOND NEW YORK INFANTRY "GERMAN RANGERS." 
ZOOK S BRIGADE - - HANCOCK S 1 )i VISION - SECOND Cows. 



(1) COL. PAUL FRANK ; BVT. BRIO.-GES (> c,,i.. IIKXKV M. KARPLES. 



Totals ...................... 14 



Losses. Ojfiffrs. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded "14 1 39 153 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 94 94 

Died in Confederate prisons 1 03 1 03 



Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va ................................................... 15 If >3 4 122 

Glendale, Va ...................................................... 2 15 17 

Antietam, Md ................................................... 4 12 2 18 

Fredericksburg, Va ............................................... 6 37 . . 43 

Chancellorsville, Va .............................................. 3 31 9 43 

Gettysburg, Pa .................................................. 2 26 i o 38 

Bristoe Station, Va ................................................. 3 6 

Mine Run, Va ..................................................... 3 . . 3 

Wilderness, Va .................................................... 4 2 6 

Po River, Va., May 10, 1864 ....................................... 10 44 24 78 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 1 2, j 864 .................................... 6 35 43 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 .................................... 5 36 43 

North Anna, Va ................................................... 2 . . 2 

Totopotomoy, Va .................................................. 4 i 5 

Cold Harbor, Va .................................................. 3 

Petersburg, Va., June 16-18, 1864 .................................. 9 43 2 54 

Siege of Petersburg, Va ........................................... 24 97 . . 121 

Deep Bottom, Va. (6 cos.), August 14, 1864 ........................... 2 

Ream s Station, Va. (6 cos.) ......................................... 2 29 31 

White Oak Road, Va., March 31, 1865 .............................. 5 2 3 3 

Sutherland Station, Va., April 2, 1865 ................................ 6 27 3 36 

Includes the mortally wounded. ^Includes the captured. 

Totals ................. 95 541 116 75 2 

Present, also, at Peach Orchard ; Savage Station ; Malvern Hill ; Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 
NOTES. Recruited in New York City, was mustered in by companies from August 3 to November 4, 1861. 
It proceeded to Washington, November 12, 1 86 1, where it was assigned to the Third Brigade, First Division, 
Second Corps, in which it remained during its entire service. In April, 1862, the Fifty-second accompanied the 
corps to the Peninsula, and at Fair Oaks the regiment went into its first action, where, under command of Colonel 
Frank, it establised a reputation for efficiency underfire. Out of 320 who were engaged there, 122 were killed or 
wounded, while each of the field-officers had their horses shot under them. But the deadliest fighting was en 
countered at Spotsylvania, where the regiment participated in the hand-to-hand struggle and terrible musketry fire 
at the famous Angle. Here Count Van Haake and Baron Von Steuben, both of whom were Prussian officers on 
furlough, were killed while fighting as line officers in the Fifty-second. Major Edward Venuti was killed at Gettys 
burg. Col. Frank was mustered out at the expiration of his term of service. He was succeeded by Col. Karples, who 
had been in command of the regiment much of the time, Colonel Frank having been placed in command of the 
brigade. The Fifty-second was composed of men of German birth ; yet it fought for the flag of the Union as 
gallantly as ever Germans fought on the battle fields of their fatherland. 



200 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

FIFTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
HALL S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM LINN TIDBALL. (2) COL. WILLIAM NORTHEDGE. (3) COL. WILLIAM A. OLMSTED ; BVT. BKIG.-GEN. 

Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 14 1 29 143 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 65 65 

Died in Confederate prisons 62 62 



Totals 14 256 270 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Antietam, Md 48 153 23 224 

Fredericksburg, Va 5 39 . . 44 

Chancellorsville, Va i 7 7 15 

Gettysburg, Pa. (4 cos.) 6 28 . . 34 

Bristoe Station, Va 5 2 7 

Blackburn s Ford, Va., Oct. 15, 1863 i . . i 

Mine Run, Va . . i i 

Wilderness, Va 2 8 4 14 

Spotsylvania, Va 4 23 5 32 

North Anna, and Totopotomoy, Va 5 27 .. 32 

Cold Harbor, Va 9 27 . . 36 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 12 51 61 124 

Strawberry Plains, Va 8 12 20 

Deep Bottom, Va 18 5 23 

Ream s Station, Va 4 37 41 

Boydton Road, Va i 5 .. 6 

Farmville, Va , 2 . . 2 

"Includes the mortally wounded, tlnoludes the captured. 

Totals 93 406 157 656 

Present, also, at Malvern Hill (August 1862) ; Thoroughfare Gap (1863) ; Williamsport ; Hatcher s Run; 
High Bridge ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited in New York City, and in the counties of Jefferson, Lewis, Putnam, and Westchester. 
It was organized at Green Point (East New York) in October, 1861, leaving the State on the igth of November, 
following. It was stationed for several months in the defences of Washington, under General Wadsworth, and 
remained there while the Army was on the Peninsula; but in August, 1862, the Fifty-ninth joined General 
McClellan s forces, which were then starting on their victorious Maryland campaign, and was assigned to Dana s 
(3d) Brigade, Sedgwick s (2d) Division, Second Corps. The regiment saw its first fighting at Antietam, where 
it was engaged in Sedgwick s bloody affair at the Dunker church. It went into that action with 21 officers and 
300 men, of whom 224 were killed or wounded. Nine officers, including Lieutenant-Colonel John L. Stetson, 
were killed or mortally wounded there, a loss of officers killed which was exceeded in only two other instances 
during the war ; several other officers were wounded there, while seven of the eight color corporals were either 
killed or disabled. The regiment, becoming reduced in numbers, was consolidated into four companies in 1863, 
and took these four companies, only, into the fight at Gettysburg. It fought there in Hall s Brigade of Gibbon s 
(2d) Division ; Lieutenant-Colonel Max Thoman, commanding the regiment, was killed there. The Fifty-ninth 
remained in the Second Division (Gibbon s) until the end of the war. General Alex. S. Webb commanded the 
brigade in the Wilderness campaign and was wounded at Spotsylvania. He was succeeded by Colonel H. B. 
Me Keen who was killed at Cold Harbor. Mustered out June 30, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 201 

SIXTY-FIRST NEW YORK INFANTRY " CLINTON GUARD." 

MII.KS S I .KiiiADi -BARLOW S DIVISION -- SECOND CUKI*S. 



(1) Cou FRANCIS C. BARLOW ; MAJOII-GKN.. U. S. V. (3) COL. OSCAR K. BROADY. 

(8) COL. NELSON A. MILES ; BVT. MAJOK-GKS., U. 8. A. (4) COL. GEORGE W. SCOTT ; BVT. RRUI.-GEN.. U. 8. V. 

I* *"- ~pffi^. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 16 177 193 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 2 90 92 

Died in Confederate prisons 31 31 

Totals 18 298 316 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va 31 73 5 no 

Peach Orchard, Va 4 . . 4 

White Oak Swamp, Va 2 

Glendale, Va 6 55 18 79 

Malvern Hill, Va 2 22 27 

Antietam, Md 6 34 i 41 

Fredericksburg, Va 9 27 . . 36 

Chancellorsville, Va i \ 6 i o 27 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 56 . . 62 

Bristoe Station, Va . . i i 

Wilderness, Va : 3 . . 3 

Corbin s Bridge, Va., May 8, 1 864 5 31 . . 36 

Po River, Va., May 10, 1 864 3 10 .. 13 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12-18, 1 864 13 38 53 

North Anna and Totopotomoy, Va i 2 . . 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 17 3 22 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 8 78 i o 1 06 

Strawberry Plains, Va., July 27,1 864 i i 

Deep Bottom, Va., August 16, 1864 2 5 7 14 

Ream s Station, Va 3 1 1 25 39 

Sailor s Creek, Va 2 9 i 12 

Farmville, Va 4 12 16 

Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 116 509 88 713 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Savage Station ; Mine Run ; Hatcher s Run ; White Oak Road ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Sixty-first had the good fortune and honor to be commanded by men who proved to be 
among the ablest soldiers of the war. . They made brilliant records as colonels of this regiment, and, being pro 
moted, achieved a national reputation as division generals. The Sixty-first saw an unusual amount of active 
service and hard fighting. At Fair Oaks, under command of Colonel Barlow, they lost 1 10 killed and wounded, 
out of 432 who were in the action ; Lieutenant-Colonel W. C. Masset, and five of the color-guard were killed in 
this fight. At Antietam the regiment captured two stands of colors, and at Fredericksburg, under Colonel Miles, 
it sustained a severe loss in proportion to its numbers, the colonel being severely wounded there. 
The regiment was recruited from various counties in the State, one company being composed of 
students from Madison Uuiversity. It was organized at New York City, from August 22d to October 26, 1861. 
It reenlisted at the end of its three years term, and served until July, 1865. It served through the war in the 
First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps. This division was commanded successively by Generals Richardson 
(killed at Antietam), Hancock, Caldwell, Barlow and Miles. 



202 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTY-THIRD NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
IRISH BRIGADE HANCOCK S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN BURKE. 

(2) COL. HENRY FOWLER. 



(3) COL. RICHARD C. BENTLEY ; BVT. BRIG.-GKN. 

(4) COL. JOHN II. GLEASON ; BVT. MAJOK-GEN. 
(5) COL. JAMES D. BRADY. 



Losses. 


Officers. 

1C 


En. Men. 
141 

62 
3 


Total. 
156 

63 
30 















Totals 16 



233 



Total enrollment, 1,411 ; killed, 



156;= ii. o per cent. 
Killed. 
I 



9 
6 



. i 



1 1 



Total. 
4 

2 

8 

70 

2O2 

44 
6 

2 3 
9 

95 
3 1 
4 
8 

29 
78 
1 1 
27 

5 

i 

657 

White Oak Swamp ; Malvern 
Hill ; Mine Run ; Po River ; Strawberry Plains ; Boydton Road ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Third Regiment, Irish Brigade. Like the other regiments in that brigade, the Sixty-third carried 
a green flag. On it was the name of the State with the regimental volunteer number. The flag instead of being 
blue like the State flags in other brigades, was a deep rich green, and on it was embroidered an Irish harp, 
a sunburst, and a wreath of shamrock. Each regiment of the brigade carried, also, the National colors elegant 
silken flags which displayed the Stars and Stripes. At Antietam the regiment lost six officers killed near "Bloody 
Lane," and sixteen men were killed or wounded in that battle while carrying the colors ; its total loss being 202 
killed or wounded out of 341 who entered the field. The brigade carried the position at Antietam in the face 
of a severe fire ; Meagher s line was then relieved by Caldwell s fine brigade, which advanced through them by 
breaking into columns of companies to the front, while Meagher s men retired by the right of companies to the 
rear, these two noted brigades executing the manoeuvre as steadily as if on parade. The regiment having retin- 
listed, fought in all the battles of Grant s Virginia campaign, sustaining further terrible losses in men and officers, 
the latter including Major Thomas Tuohy, a gallant and intrepid soldier who fell mortally wounded at the Wilder 
ness. With the other regiments of the Irish Brigade, it served throughout the war in the Second Brigade, First 
Division, Second Corps. 



Battles. 

Fair Oaks, Va 

On Picket, Va., June 24, 1862 

On Picket, Va., June 26, 1862 i 

Seven Days Battle, Va 2 

Antietam, Md 35 

Fredericksburg, Va 2 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa. (2 cos.) 5 

Bristoe Station, Va 

Wilderness, Va 

Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna, Va 

Totopotomoy, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 

Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864 

Ream s Station, Va 

Sailor s Creek, Va 

Farmville, Va 

*Includes the mortally wounded, tine-hides the captured. 

Totals 77 444 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Gaines s Mill ; Peach Orchard ; Savage Station 



Wounded * 


Missin. 


2 


I 


2 


* 


7 




17 


5 1 


165 


2 


38 


4 


3 


2 


10 


8 


2 


7 


7 8 


8 


22 


3 


4 


* 


4 


2 


23 


5 


48 


19 


10 


i 


4 


23 


4 


* 


i 





136 



249 



TlIKKK HUNDKKI) FlUHTING REGIMENTS. 203 

SIXTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INFANTRY "CATTARAUGUS REGIMENT." 

I .KM ) >K K s P,i;i< ; \ |K - BARLOW S DIVISION - SECOND COKIS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS J. PAKKKK. (3) Col.. LEMAN W. UKADI.KY. 

(2) COL. DANIEL G. BIN(iHAM. (4) COL. WILLIAM ;I.KNNY; MVT. HIIIO.-EN. 



Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 13 1 60 173 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 5 85 90 

Died in Confederate prisons 29 29 

Totals 1 8 274 292 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing.\ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va 30 143 .. 173 

Seven Days Battle, Va 2 1 1 25 38 

Antietam, Md 8 42 . . 50 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 68 . . 72 

Chancellorsville, Va 15 21 8 44 

Gettysburg, Pa 15 64 19 98 

Auburn, Va., October 14, 1863 54 17 

Bristoe Station, Va., October 14,1 863 i 17 25 

Mine Run, Va i 2 . . 3 

Wilderness, Va 8 . . 8 

Po River, Va 2 10 4 1 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 41 59 

North Anna, Va 2 . . 2 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 . . 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 10 .. 12 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 7 28 . . 35 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 2 28 30 

Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864 i i 2 4 

Ream s Station, Va 4 12 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1 864 4 12 i 17 

White Oak Road, Va 3 13 i 17 

Sutherland Station, Va 2 4 i 7 

Farmville, Va 5 1 1 1 6 

Includes the mortally wounded, tint-hides the captured. 

Totals 117 510 130 757 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Gaines s Mill ; Savage Station ; Peach Orchard ; White Oak Swamp ; Glendale ; 
Malvern Hill; Strawberry Plains; Sailor s Creek; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Formerly the Sixty-fourth Militia, but reorganized as a volunteer command at Klmira in the autumn 
of 1861. The regiment arrived at Washington, December n, 1861, and went into camp near the capitol. It 
commenced active sen-ice in Virginia, January 2, 1862, performing picket duty, with an occasional recon- 
noissance, until April 5, 1862, when it sailed for the Peninsula with General McClellan s Army. It served there 
in Richardson s Division afterwards Hancock s remaining in that division (ist Division, 2<1 A. C.) until the 
end of the war. The Sixty-fourth, under Colonel Bingham, distinguished itself at Chancellorsville, where, in 
company with four other regiments, it held successfully an advanced skirmish-line against the persistent attack of 
a large force of the enemy. This line was in charge of Colonel Nelson A. Miles of the Sixty-first New York, 
and the brilliancy of the affair became a matter of history. The regiment fought at Gettysburg in Caldwell s 
Division (same division), and lost there 98 out of the 20 officers and 185 men who marched with the colors on 
that field. 



204: REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SIXTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
IRISH BRIGADE HANCOCK S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



COLONEL ROBERT NUGENT, &. S.; BVT. BRIQ.-GEN. 



Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 13 246 259 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 86 86 

Died in Confederate prisons 56 56 



Totals 13 388 401 

Battles. Killed. Wounded.* Missing. \ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va i 12 i 14 

Gaines s Mill, Va i i 2 

Peach Orchard, Va i i 4 6 

White Oak Swamp, Va 2 15 28 45 

Malvern Hill, Va 17 no 28 155 

Antietam, Md 44 J 5 2 X 96 

Fredericksburg, Va 10 95 23 128 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 7 I0 

Gettysburg, Pa. (2 cos.) 5 14 6 25 

Bristoe Station, Va 2 2 

Wilderness, Va 7 37 8 52 

Spotsylvania, Va 17 82 23 122 

Totopotomoy, Va i 2 3 6 

Cold Harbor, Va 5 3 1 5 4 1 

Petersburg, Va. (assault June 16-18, 1864) 3 22 18 43 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 1 26 45 

Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864 i 5 6 

Ream s Station, Va 6 46 52 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 7 33 4 

Sailor s Creek, Va 2 4 .. 6 

Farmville, Va i i 2 

*Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 138 656 204 998 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Savage Station ; Mine Run ; Po River ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; White 
Oak Road ; Fall of Petersburg ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. There were three regiments, each known as the Sixty-ninth New York. One of them, a militia 
regiment, was the one which fought at First Bull Run, and afterwards volunteered repeatedly in different emer 
gencies ; another, the one whose losses are given above, served through the war in the famous Irish Brigade, and 
was the one generally known as the Sixty-ninth New York ; the other, the Sixty-ninth National Guard Artillery, 
served in the Corcoran Legion and was known officially as the i8ad New York Volunteers. 

The Sixty-ninth proper, to which this page belongs, was organized in September, 1861 ; served three years, 
after which it reenlisted, and served through the remainder of the war, its gallantry on many fields attesting anew 
the fidelity and courage of the Irish soldier. At Antietam this regiment, then in Richardson s Division, fought 
at the Bloody Lane, where eight of its color-bearers were successively shot down. At Fredericksburg a color- 
sergeant of the Sixty-ninth was found dead, with the flag concealed and wrapped around his body, a bullet having 
pierced the flag and his heart. In that battle the regiment lost 16 officers and 112 men killed and wounded, out 
of 1 8 officers and 210 men engaged.* The Sixty-ninth lost the most men in action, killed and wounded, of any 
regiment from the State of New York. 

* Official Records, Vol. xxi ; but Captain Saunders, in his official report, states this loss at 16 officers and 100 men. 



TUREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 205 

SEVENTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY " FIRST EXCELSIOR." 
SICKLES S BRIGADE - HOOKER S DIVISION- - THIRD COUPS. 



(1) COL. DANIEL E. SICKLES ; BVT. MAJOH-GEN.. U. 8. A. (3) Coi.. WILLIAM DWKillT ; BUIU.-GKN., U. S. V. 

(3) COL. J. E. FAKNUM; BVT. BIUO.-GKN., U. S. V. 

Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 9 j8i igo 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 2 c 2 54 

Died in Confederate prisons I0 10 

Totals ii 243 254 

Total enrollment, 1,462 ; killed, 190 ; 12.9 per cent. 

Battles. KilU-d. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Yorktown, Va 2 . . 2 

Williamsburg, Va 79 138 113 330 

Fair Oaks, Va 2 15 i 18 

Oak Grove, Va 3 i o i 14 

Malvern H ill, Va i . . i 

Bristoe Station, Va. (1862) 5 

Manassas, Va i 12 i o 23 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 . . 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 4 1 1 17 32 

Gettysburg, Pa 20 93 4 117 

Wapping I leights, Va 1 1 21 . . 32 

Mine Hun, Va i 7 

Wilderness, Va 4 i <S 5 27 

Spotsylvania, Va 2 31 i o 43 

North Anna, and Totopotomoy, Va . . i o 

Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 129 376 161 666 

Present, also, at Stafford Court House ; Glendale ; Chantilly ; Cold Harbor ; Petersburg. 

NOTES. Recruited in New York City, and musterd into service June 20, 1 86 1 , as the First Regiment, Sickles s 
Brigade. It left the brigade camp on Staten Island, July 23, 1861, and was stationed at Washington a few weeks, 
after which it performed guard duty along the Maryland side of the Lower Potomac. During the Peninsular 
campaign the Excelsior Brigade was in Hooker s Division, upon which fell the brunt of the battle at Williamsburg, 
the Seventieth, under Colonel Dvvight, being in the thickest of the fighting. The regiment numbered there, 
according to the official report, about 700 men, and its casualty list shows a loss of nearly one-half. One more 
such fight would have ended its existence. Of 33 officers, in that battle, seven were killed and twenty-two 
wounded. Colonel Farnum commanded the regiment at Gettysburg, where it fought in Humphreys s Division, on 
the Emmettsburg Road in the battle of the second day, and sustained a severe loss before it yielded this advanced 
position and retired to the second line. During the pursuit of I>ee, the Excelsior Brigade, on July 23, 1863, 
attacked the Confederate rear-guard at Wapping Heights, Va., a fight in which the main loss fell on the Seven 
tieth. Upon the transfer of the Third Corps to the Second, the brigade, under command of Colonel W. R. 
Brewster, was assigned to Mott s Division, and from that time fought with the Second Corps until the expiration 
of its term of service. It was mustered out July i, 1864, and the recruits transferred to the Eighty-sixth New 
York. 



206 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTY-SECOND NEW YORK INF ANTRY - - " THIED EXCELSIOR." 
SICKLES S BRIGADE HOOKER S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. NELSON TAYLOK ; BBIO.-GEN. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM O. STEVENS (Killed). 



(3) COL. JOHN S. AUSTIN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, <fec. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 

I 
I 

3 

i 



i 
i 



i 




5 
14 

21 
2O 

14 

14 

J 9 

21 
I I 
I I 


I 
6 

15 

22 

2 3 
15 
14 
2O 

22 
II 
12 




I 













II 
IO 

6 
5 

IO 

5 

10 
10 

16 
5 




12 
10 

6 

5 

IO 

5 

IO 
10 

16 

5 


IS 
IOI 
132 

5 1 
123 

127 

JI 5 
1x8 

M5 
118 

I0 5 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


1 1 


15 


161 


I 


88 


89 


1,250 





161 killed = 12.8 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 509 ; captured and missing, 158 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 10. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Williamsburg, Va 77 

Seven Days Battle, Va i 

Malvern Hill, Va 20 

Bristoe Station, Va. (1862) 7 

Manassas, Va 2 

Fredericksburg, Va i 

Chancellorsville, Va 18 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Wapping Heights, Va 2 

Mine Run, Va 5 

Wilderness, Va 4 

Spotsylvania, Va 4 

North Anna, Va i 

Petersburg, Va 3 

On Picket, Va \ 



Gettysburg, Pa 15 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Fair Oaks, Glendale ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor; Deep Bottom (i Co.); 
Peeble s Farm. 

NOTES. Recruited principally in New York city and Chautauqua county, Company B coming from James 
town, N. Y., and Companies D and E from Dunkirk, N. Y. A regimental organization was effected at Staten 
Island, where the other regiments of Sickles s Brigade were forming, and in June, 1861, the command left for 
Washington. The brigade was attached to Hooker s Division and ordered on duty along the Lower Potomac, 
where it remained until it joined General McClellan s army in 1862. Colonel Taylor commanded the brigade at 
Williamsburg, where it received the principal force of the enemy s attack. The Seventy-second held an 
advanced position there, and lost 59 killed, 90 wounded, and 46 missing, the most of the latter being either 
killed or wounded. The regiment was prominently engaged at Malvern Hill, its losses in that action amounting 
to 14 killed and 47 wounded, out of about 300 who were in the engagement. Colonel Stevens and four other 
officers were killed at Chancellorsville, the regiment losing in that battle, n killed, 31 wounded, and 59 missing; 
total, 101. At Gettysburg, the Excelsior Brigade participated in General Sickles s grand battle, known as the 
second day s fight, the thinned ranks of the Seventy-second being again sadly depleted by the enemy s fire. Its 
casualties on that field were 7 killed, 79 wounded, and 28 missing ; total, 1 14. The Excelsior Brigade was com 
manded, first by General Sickles, and then by Colonel Taylor, who was succeeded by Colonel W. R. Brewster. 
The division commanders were Hooker, Berry and Humphreys. Upon the transfer of the Third Corps to the 
Second, in April, 1864, the brigade was placed in Mott s (4th) Division, afterwards Birney s. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 207 

SKYFATY-THTRI) NEW YORK INFANTRY "ForK TII KXCKLSIOR." 
SICKLES S BRIGADE -- HOOKER S DIVISION --THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM It. BKEWSTEK; UVT. BIUG.-UKN. (2) COL. MICHAKL W. BURNS. 



Losses. Officer*. En. Men. Total. 

killed and mortally wounded i$ 138 i c6 

Died of disease, accidents, etc x 62 63 

Died in Confederate prisons ^ j . 

Totals j9 .- , | 233 

Total enrollment, 1,350; killed, 156; percentage, 11.5. 

Battles. Kilh-d. Wounded* Missing.\ Total. 

Williamsburg, Va 1 7 67 20 104 

Fair Oaks, Va ! I0 .. n 

Picket Line, Va., June, 1862 2 3 1 1 16 

Oak Grove, Va 2 25 i 28 

Seven Days Battle, Va x T 5 

Bristoe Station, Va. (1862) i o 36 . . 46 

Manassas, Va 4 . . 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 31 4 38 

Gettysburg, Pa 51 103 8 162 

Wapping Heights, Va i 7 . . 8 

Wilderness, Va 6 54 6 66 

Spotsylvania, Va 6 22 2 30 

North Anna, and Totopotomoy, Va i 13 . . 14 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 .. 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 23 . . 29 

Strawberry Plains, V^. (8 companies) i 2 . . 3 

Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864 2 2 .. 4 

Weldon Railroad, Va 3 . . 3 

Boydton Road, Va i 4 29 34 

Includes the mortally wounded, tlndudes the captured. 

Totals in 416 86 613 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Glendale ; Malvern Hill ; Kelly s Ford ; Mine Run ; Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s 
Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized as the Second Fire Zouaves, having been largely recruited from the New York Fire 
Department. It joined Sickles s Brigade, and arrived at Washington, 897 strong, in August, 1861. The bricade 
was stationed at Camp McClellan, below Washington, at Good Hope, Md., and while there was assigned to 
Hooker s Division, which afterwards became famous by its gallant action at Williamsburg. This one division, also, 
fought the battle of Bristoe Station, Va., August 27, 1862 one of the preliminary actions at Manassas the 
brunt of the fight falling on the "Excelsior" Brigade, which successfully carried a strong position of the Confeder 
ates, but with a loss of forty per cent. The Seventy-third had only 8 officers and 99 men present there ; three 
of these officers were killed. The One Hundred and Sixty-third New York was disbanded January 20, 1863, and 
the men transferred to the Fourth Excelsior. By this arrangement the depleted ranks of the regiment received 
a nominal accession of 365 men, of whom about 250 reported for duty. Colonel Brewster commanded the 
" Excelsior " Brigade at Gettysburg and during all its subsequent service in the field, leaving Colonel Burns in com 
mand of the regiment both in battle and camp. During the campaigns of 1864-5 ^ fought in Birney s (3d) 
Division of the Second Corps, the Third Corps having been discontinued in April, 1864, and transferred to 
the Second. 



208 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SEVENTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INFANTRY " FIFTH EXCELSIOR." 
EXCELSIOR BRIGADE HOOKER S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) Cor,. CHARLES K. GRAHAM ; BVT. MAJOK-GEN. (3) COL. THOMAS HOLT ; BVT. BKIG.-GEN. 

(2) COL. CHARLES H. BURTIS. (4) COL. WILLIAM H. LOUNSBERRY. 



Bosses. Officers. En. Men. Toted. 

Killed and mortally wounded 122 130 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 2 57 59 

Died in Confederate prisons 10 10 

Totals 10 189 199 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Yorktown, Va i i 

Williamsburg,Va 3 6 54 53 J 43 

Fair Oaks, Va * i 19 20 

Oak Grove, Va 2 28 . . 30 

Seven Days Battle, Va 9 15 24 

Bristoe Station, Va. (1862) 10 53 i 64 

Manassas,Va i 15 l8 34 

Chancellorsville, Va : 3 22 15 40 

Gettysburg, Pa 12 74 3 89 

Wapping Heights, Va 4 7 n 

Mine Run, Va i 9 10 

Wilderness, Va i 16 7 24 

Spotsylvania, Va 3 12 i 16 

North Anna, Va 3 2 5 

Totopotomoy, Va 4 3 7 

Cold Harbor, Va i i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va > 2 . . 10 

"Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 76 335 118 529 

Present, also, at Glendale ; Malvern Hill ; Chantilly ; Fredericksburg ; Deep Bottom. 

NOTES. Organized at New York in June, 1861. Preparatory to its departure for the field it was encamped 
on Staten Island with other regiments of Sickles s Brigade. In August, 1 86 1, the command left New York for 
Washington, and was stationed near there several weeks. The brigade, having been assigned to Hooker s Division, 
was ordered to occupy the line of the Lower Potomac in Maryland, where it patrolled the river for twenty miles. 
In November, 1861, part of the regiment crossed the river with Colonel Graham on an expedition to Mathias 
Point, Va. In April, 1862, the brigade left its winter-quarters in Maryland to join General McClellan s advance 
up the Peninsula. The Seventy-fourth distinguished itself at Williamsburg, where the brigade fought in an abattis 
of felled timber, holding its position successfully against the main force of the enemy. The division was com 
manded at Chancellorsville by General Berry, who was killed there. The Seventy-fourth received but few 
recruits, and when it marched to Gettysburg its thinned ranks showed the effects of bullets and disease. Still it 
faced the hottest of the musketry on that historic field, with the consequent heavy percentage of loss. The Third 
Corps was transferred to the Second in March, 1864, and with it the Excelsior Brigade under Colonel Brewster. 
The brigade under this arrangement became the Second Brigade of Mott s Division. The Seventy-fourth was 
mustered out June 26, 1864; the reenlisted men and recruits with unexpired terms were transferred to the 
Fortieth New York. As only one of the " Excelsior" regiments reenlisted, the service of that famous brigade 
terminated in July, 1864. 



THKKE HUNDRED FICSHTING KKGIMENTS. 



209 



SEVENTY -SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
CUTLER S BRIGADE - - WADSWORTH S DIVISION - - FIRST CORPS. 



(I) COL. NELSON W. GREEN. (2) COL. WILLIAM P. WAINWHKiHT ; BVT. Hmo.-GitN. (3) COL. CHAHLES E. LIVINGSTONE. 



COMI A.MKS. 


KILLED AMI DIED or WOL-NW. 


I)IEI> OF DlfKANK, ACTIDKNTM, IN PlllHON, tl . 


Total 

Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


V, 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



2 
2 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 


i 

i? 

12 

16 
18 
16 

!5 

i5 
17 
18 
16 


3 
7 
14 
18 

9 
16 

16 
16 
18 

9 

!7 





I 












1 1 

23 

14 

3 
1 6 

1 8 

3 
1 1 

20 

7 




I I 
23 

5 

3 
16 

18 

!3 

1 1 

20 

7 


16 

"5 1 
140 

146 

152 

149 

47 
144 
149 

5 
146 


Company A 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 




I 2 


161 


i?3 


1 


56 


157 


,49 





173 killed 11.6 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 654 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 51. 



35 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Warrenton Springs, Va i 

Gainesville, Va | 
Manassas, Va j 

South Mountain, Md 5 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Gettysburg, Pa 48 

Wilderness, Va 38 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 1 



BATTLES. I 

North Anna, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 10 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 10 

Weldon Railroad, Va 2 

Poplar Spring Church, Va i 

Picket Line, Va i 

Gunboat Mound City 2 



Present, also, at Antietam ; Fitz Hugh s Crossing; Chancellorsville ; Mine Run; Totopotomoy ; Cold 
Harbor ; Boydton Road. 

NOTES. The men of this regiment were proud of the suggestive numerals in their regimental title, and by 
theii gallantry and patriotism pioved themselves worthy of the historic figures emblazoned on their colors. The 
Seventy-sixth was recruited in Cortland and Otsego counties in 1861, and arrived at Washington, Febniary i, 
1862. It was assigned soon after to Doubleday s Brigade, Hatch s Division. Its first battle was at Manassas, 
where the regiment under command of Colonel Wainwright was engaged at Warrenton Springs, Gainesville, and 
the other engagements incidental to the main one, sustaining a loss of 1 1 killed, 88 wounded, and 48 missing ; 
total, 147. The Seventy-sixth met its greatest loss at Gettysburg. In the first day s battle on that field, it took 27 
officers and 348 men into the fight, and in half an hour lost 32 killed, 132 wounded, and 70 missing ; total, 234. 
Major A. J. Grover, who was in command of the regiment at Gettysburg, was among; the killed. In March, 1864, 
the Seventy-sixth was assigned to Rice s Brigade, Wadsworth s Division, Fifth Corps. In the Wilderness, the 
regiment lost two color-bearers killed, and three wounded, its casualties in that battle amounting to 27 killed, 69 
wounded, and 186 captured or missing; total, 282. General Rice, the brigade commander, was mortally 
wounded at Spotsylvania while leading the Seventy-sixth. A surgeon asked the dying general if he could place 
him in an easier position. Rice replied : " Yes, turn me so that I may die with my face to the enemy." The 
regiment was mustered out in January, 1865, its term of enlistment having expired. The rei-nlisted men and 

recruits were transferred to the One Hundred and Forty-seventh New York. 
14 



210 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. "HIGHLANDERS." 
CHRIST S BRIGADE - - WILLCOX S DIVISION - - NINTH CORPS. 



(I) COL. JAMES CAMERON (Killed). 

(3; COL. ISAAC 1- STEVENS, OT. $.; MAJOR-GEN (Killed). 



(3) COL. ADDISON FARNSWORTII ; BVT. BBIG.-GEN. 

(4) COL. DAVID MORRISON ; BVT. BKIG.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 





I 

I 





U 

M 
IO 

M 

8 

7 
1 8 

IO 

T 3 

9 


I 

3 
14 
IO 

15 

9 

7 
18 

IO 

13 

9 


I 






I 
13 

9 
1 1 

8 

9 
6 

5 
7 
5 
4 


2 
13 

9 
1 1 

8 

9 
6 

5 
7 
5 
4 


19 
133 

I2 5 
140 

138 

1J 5 
142 

142 

147 

135 

149 




B 


c 


D , 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


3 


116 


119 


I 


78 


79 


1,385* 





BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

First Bull Run, Va 40 

Lewinsville, Va i 

James Island. S. C 36 

Manassas, Va 9 

Chantilly, Va 10 

South Mountain, Md i 



Total of killed, wounded and missing, 502. 

BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Antietam, Md 8 

Blue Springs, Term 2 

Fort Sanders, Tenn 5 

Siege of Knoxville, Tenn i 

Spotsylvania, Va 5 

Prison-guard i 



Present, also, at Blackburn s Ford, Va. ; Pocotaligo, S. C. ; Kelly s Ford, Va. ; Fredericksburg, Va. ; Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; Jackson, Miss. ; Campbell s Station, Tenn. ; Wilderness, Va. ; Hatcher s Run, Va. ; Petersburg, Va. 

NOTES. Composed mostly of Scotchmen, uniformed in their national costume, the officers wearing kilts 
and the men wearing pantaloons of the Cameron tartan. After active service commenced, this dress was laid 
aside and the United States service uniform was substituted. The men of the Seventy-ninth fully sustained the 
honor and military reputation of their native land, and fought for the government of their adoption as gallantly as 
ever Scotchmen fought on native soil or on foreign fields. Previous to the war this regiment had belonged 
to the State National Guard, and at the outbreak of hostilities it was among the first to tender its services. It 
marched to First Bull Run, where it sustained one of the heaviest losses on that field, its casualties amounting to 
32 killed, 51 wounded, 115 missing or captured. Colonel Cameron, brother of the Secretary of War, was killed 
there while in command of the regiment. At the battle of James Island (Secessionville), it was in Stevens s 
Division, and lost 1 10 men there out of 474 engaged. In August, 1862, the gallant regiment fought again on the 
Manassas Plains, and in the actions at Second Bull Run and Chantilly lost 9 killed, 79 wounded, and 17 missing; 
total, 105. General Stevens, formerly Colonel of the Higlanders, was killed at Chantilly, where, after six color- 
bearers of the Seventy-ninth had fallen, the General seized the flag and shouting, ".Highlanders ! My Highland 
ers ! Follow your General," led the charge and fell dead amid the cheers of victory with the color- staff grasped 
firmly in his hand.f The regiment s term of enlistment expired May 13, 1864, the order for muster-out reach 
ing the men while they stood in line on the bloody field of Spotsylvania. The recruits were organized into a 
battalion which served through the war, doing provost-duty at Corps headquarters. 



* Does not include the battalion organized in 18(54. 



t History of the Seventy-ninth Highlanders ; William Todd. 



THKKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



211 



EIGHTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"ULSTER GUARD." 
PAUL S BRIGADE- DOI-HLKDAV S DIVISION - FIRST COUPS. 



(1) COL. (iEORGB W. PKA1T (Killed). 



(2) Cm.. TIIEODOKK B. (JATES; HVT. BHHI. OEN. 



(3) COL. JACOB B. HARDENBURGH ; HVT. BKH;.-<;EN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED <>K \VorNDs. 


DIED OK DioEAHK, ACCIDENTS. IN I UIMON, &<. 


Total 
Enrollment. 

1 6 

210 
ly 7 
IQI 
2 19 
226 

177 

234 
199 

198 
236 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


field and Staff 


I 






2 
I 
I 
I 



2 




9 
1 1 

1 1 

7 
13 
M 
9 

I 2 
12 
12 


I 

9 
1 1 

1 1 

7 

5 

15 

10 

13 

T 2 
14 










* 


I 

2O 
16 

3 

22 

4 
3 

21 
1 I 

M 
1 2 


I 

20 

16 

13 

22 
14 

13 

2 I 

1 I 

M 

I 2 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


I 2O 


128 





57 


57 


2,103 





Total of killed and wounded, 439; captured and missing. 144 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 22. 



BATTLES. 

Norman s Ford, Va , 

Rappahannock, Va , 

Warrenton Springs, Va , 

Manassas, Va 51 

Chantilly, Va i 

South Mountain, Md i 



K. &M.W 
i 
i 
i 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Antietam, Md 12 

Fredericksburg, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 47 

Petersburg, Va 6 

Place unknown c 



Present, also, at Beverly Ford ; Gainesville ; Groveton ; Wilderness ; Spotsylvania ; North Anna ; Totopoto- 
moy ; Cold Harbor ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. This regiment was from Ulster county, and was better known as the Twentieth, it having served in 
the State Militia for several years under that number. Although known officially as the Kightieth Infantry, it 
never accepted that designation, but adhered faithfully to its old militia number. Colonel Pratt, who commanded 
it before the war also, was a gentleman of wealth, education, and a member of the State Senate. He was killed 
at Manassas. At that battle the regiment was in Patrick s Brigade, Hatch s Division, and lost 32 killed, 165 
wounded, and 82 missing; total, 279. At Antietam its casualties were 6 killed, 40 wounded, and 8 missing; 
total, 54. It distinguished itself particularly at Gettysburg by the prominent part which it took in the repulse of 
Pickett s charge. The regiment was then in Rowley s (ist) Brigade, Doubleday s Division ; but during the battle 
of the third day, a part of the brigade, including the Twentieth, was under the command of Colonel Gates ; its 
loss at Gettysburg was 35 killed, 111 wounded, and 24 missing; total, 170. In July, 1863, the regiment was 
detached from its corps and ordered to report to General Patrick, the Provost Marshal of the army, for duty in 
his department. It remained on provost-duty at General Headquaiters until the final assault on Petersburg, when 
it joined the assaulting column and lost several in killed and wounded.- The Twentieth served first as a three 
months regiment, leaving Kingston, April 28, 1861, anil was stationed at Annapolis Junction, and at Baltimore. 
It reorganized under a three years enlistment, and left the State again, October 25, 1861. After a short stay at 
Washington, it crossed into Virginia, November 7, 1861, and joined Wadsworth s Brigade, going into winter 
quarters at Upton s Hill. The regiment was continued in service until January 29, 1866. 



212 KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

EIGHTY-FIEST NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
MARSTON S BRIGADE BROOKS S DIVISION EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWIN ROSE, OT. $. (3) COL. JOHN B. RAULSTON. 

(2) COL. JACOB J. DEFOREST. (4) COL. DAVID B. WHITE; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 



Losses. 


Officers. 


En. Men. 
129 
96 


Total. 
142 

97 











Totals 14 225 239 



Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing.\ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va 25 92 20 137 

Seven Days Battle, Va i i 2 

Swift Creek, Va i 4 5 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 2 17 4 23 

Cold Harbor, Va 46 159 10 215 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 1 32 . . 43 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 9 50 .. 59 

Darbytovvn Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 3 3 

Picket, and Skirmishes 4 26 i 31 

*Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 98 384 36 518 

Present, also, at Siege of Yorktown, Va. ; Williamsburg, Va. ; Malvern Hill, Va. ; Winston, N. C. ; Free 
Bridge, N. C. ; Williamston, N. C. Dismal Swamp, Va. : Proctor s Creek, Va. ; Bermuda Hundred, Va. ; Fall of 
Richmond. 

NOTES. Recruited principally at Oswego, in the fall of 1861. It left Oswego January 20, 1862, with 750 
men, and at Albany received 250 more, who had been recruited in Oneida county. It left the State in February, 
1862, and upon its arrival at Washington was assigned to Palmer s Brigade, Casey s Division, Fourth Corps. The 
regiment fought well at Fair Oaks, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel DeForest, who was wounded, 
and Major McAmbly, who was killed there. Upon the withdrawal of the Army from the Peninsula, the Eighty- 
first was retained at Yorktown with General Keyes s command. In December, 1862, the regiment was ordered 
to join General Foster s troops in North Carolina, where it remained on duty in the vicinity of Beaufort, S. C., 
and Morehead, N. C., for several months. In November, 1863, it was stationed on outpost duty along the Dismal 
Swamp Canal, Va. 

Having reonlisted, the regiment went home on a thirty days furlough, in March, 1864, and recruited its ranks 
preparatory to the spring campaign. It returned to Yorktown where it was ordered to join the Eighteenth Corps, 
General Wm. F. Smith commanding, and was placed in Marston s (ist) Brigade, Brooks s (ist) Division. Under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Raulston, the Eighty-first distinguished itself in the assault on Cold Harbor, where it led the 
brigade in the charge, but with a loss of half its number. In this battle it sustained the heaviest loss of any 
infantry regiment on the field. Larger losses occurred in some of the heavy artillery regiments engaged there, 
but they had three times as many men in line. 

In July, 1864, General Stannard succeeded to the command of the First Division and led it in its victorious 
assault on Fort Harrison (Chaffin s Farm). Upon the discontinuance of the Eighteenth Corps the regiment 
was transferred to Ripley s Brigade, Devens s Division of the newly-formed Twenty-fourth Corps. Colonel 
Raulston commanded the brigade at the battle on the Darbytovvn Road and, also, at other times and places. 
The regiment was mustered out August 3 i, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 

EIGHTY-SECOND NEW YORK INFANTRY SECOND N. Y. S. M. 
HARROW S BRIGADE - GIBBON S DIVISION -- SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE W. TOMPKINS. (2) COL. JAMES HUSTON (Killed). (3) COL. HENRY W. HUDSON. 

Losses. Officers. En. A/ en. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 10 171 181 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 5 59 64 

Died in Confederate prisons 24 24 



Totals 15 254 269 



Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing.\ Totai. 

First Bull Run, Va 19 15 i 35 

Siege of Yorktown, Va 2 . . 2 

Fair Oaks, Va i o 6 1 . . 71 

Seven Days Battle, Va 2 i o 42 54 

Antietam, Md 21 92 15 128 

Fredericksburg, Va 7 14 2 23 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 3 6 

Gettysburg, Pa 45 132 15 192 

Bristoe Station, Va 7 19 . . 26 

Mine Run, Va i . . i 

Wilderness, Va 4 13 12 29 

Spotsylvania, Va 6 37 51 

North Anna, and Totopotomoy, Va 4 . . 4 

Cold Harbor, Va 7 24 3 34 

Petersburg, Va i 9 1 1 1 121 

Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 129 436 212 777 

Present, also, at Blackburn s Ford ; West Point ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Glendale ; Malvern 
Hill ; Po River. 

NOTES. The Second Militia commenced recruiting for the war, April 15, 1861, and arrived at Washington, 
May 21, 1861. The regiment, having enlisted for three years, was subsequently designated as the Eighty-second 
Volunteers. It was stationed near the Capital until July 3d, when it crossed into Virginia, having been assigned to 
Schenck s Brigade of Tyler s Division, in which command it fought at First Bull Run. On August 5, 1861, the 
regiment was ordered to join Gorman s Brigade, Stone s Division, Second Corps, in which command ( ist Brigade, 
2d Division, ad A. C.) it remained without further change during its subsequent three years of service. At 
Antietam this division, under Sedgwick, fought at the Dunker Church, where it encountered an unusually severe 
fire. The Eighty-second took 339 men into that fight, of whom 128 fell under the terrible musketry, while the 
division sustained one of the largest losses encountered by any division in any one battle during the war. 

The regiment was actively engaged at Gettysburg, and, in the battle of the second and third days, lost 192 
killed or wounded out of the 365 who entered that fight. Colonel Huston was killed there, and the brigade 
(Harrow s) lost over sixty percent, of its men. General Webb commanded the brigade during the Wilderness 
campaign, in which the gallant old regiment was under fire almost daily until June 25, 1864, when its term of 
enlistment expired. It then returned home, and the recruits and rei ; nlisted men left in the field were transferred 
to the Fifty-ninth New York. 



214 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

EIGHTY-THIRD NEW YORK INFANTRY --" NINTH MILITIA." 
BAXTER S BRIGADE ROBINSON S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN W. STILES. (2) COL. JOHN HBNDRICKSON ; BVT. BHIG.-GKN. (3) COL. JOSEPH A. MOESCH (Killed). 



Losses. 


Officers. 


En. Men. 

7 1 
15 


Total. 
56 

73 
15 










Totals 




233 


244 







Battles. Killed. Wounded.* Missing. \ Total. 

Harper s Ferry, Va 2 2 . . 4 

Cedar Mountain, Va i i 2 

Thoroughfare Gap, Va i 5 6 

Manassas, Va i o 24 4 3 77 

South Mountain, Va i J 2 

Antietam, Md 6 105 3 114 

Fredericksburg, Va 19 103 3 125 

Fitz Hugh s Crossing, Va i i 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 i 4 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 18 58 82 

Mine Run, Va i 29 30 

Wilderness, Va 18 82 15 115 

Spotsylvania, Va 29 94 5 128 

North Anna, Va ] 

Bethesda Church, Va. ) 

Cold Harbor, Va i i 

""Includes the mortally wounded. 1 1ncludes the captured. 

Totals 93 441 162 696 

NOTES. Originally the Ninth New York State Militia, of New York City. It volunteered as a regiment, and 
left New York May 27, 1861. During the first year of the war it served in Banks s Division, doing duty in Mary 
land, and along the Potomac, and in the vicinity of Harper s Ferry. Although known officially as the Eighty- 
third Volunteers, it preferred its old militia number, and always alluded to itself as the " Ninth." During Pope s 
campaign, it served in HartsufFs (3d) Brigade, Ricketts s (2d) Division, McDowell s Corps, and was hotly 
engaged at Manassas. It accompanied the First Corps through all the hard fighting of McClellan s Maryland 
campaign, and then in Taylor s Brigade, Gibbon s Division fought at Fredericksburg, where it suffered its 
severest loss. Colonel Hendrickson, who commanded the regiment in this battle, was severely wounded, losing 
a leg. He was succeeded by Colonel Moesch, who was killed at the Wilderness while leading his men into action. 
The regiment, though small in numbers, distinguished itself particularly in the first day s battle at Gettysburg by 
the promient part which it took in the capture of a part of Iverson s North Carolina Brigade, an affair which 
forms one of the interesting features in the history of that greatest of battles. In March, 1864, the First Corps was 
merged into the Fifth and was discontinued, but the " Ninth " still remained in Baxter s Brigade of Robinson s 
Division. Both Baxter and Robinson were severely wounded in the spring campaign, and were obliged to 
relinquish their commands. The ranks of the Ninth were again badly cut up in the fighting at Spotsylvania, but 
on June 7th the welcome orders to start for home were received. Only 107 officers and men were left to start on 
the homeward march. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 215 



.> 



EIGHTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"FOURTEENTH BROOKLYN." 
CUTLER S BRIGADE -- WADSWORTH S l)i VISION --FIRST CORPS. 

(1) COL. ALFRED M. WOOD. ( 2) COL. KDWAKD B. FOWLER; BVT. BRIO.-OKN. 



Losses, 
Killed and mortally wounded 


Officers. 
8 


/.//. Men. 


Total. 
ifii 


Died of disease, accidents, etc 




54 


I 02 


Died in Confederate prisons 




59 


59 








10 



Totals 




Battles. Killed, 

First Bull Run, Va 23 

Falls Church, Va 2 

Rappahannock Station, Va 2 

Manassas, Va 7 

South Mountain, Mil 5 

Antietam, Md 6 

Fredericksburg, Va i 

Fitz Hugh s Crossing, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 13 

Mine Run, Va 

Wilderness, Va i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8th 7 

Spotsylvania, Va., May loth 6 

On Picket i 

Includes the mortally wounded. 4 Includes the captured. 

Totals 76 432 209 717 

Present, also, at White Sulphur Springs ; Gainesville ; Groveton ; Chancellorsville. 

NOTES. Known also as the Brooklyn Zouaves or " Red Legs." Although the regiment had existed before 
the war as the Fourteenth of the State Militia or National Guard, it became the Eighty-fourth of the line in the 
volunteer service. It was ready for the field on April 18, 1861, but marching orders were not received until May 
1 8th, when it proceeded to Washington. Its volunteer number was furnished later, but it was not accepted; 
hence, it was known by both numbers. The regiment fought at First Bull Run, and, a year later, under Colonel 
Fowler, sustained another and a heavy loss on the same field. At Antietam, under command of Major DeBevoise, 
it entered the fight with about one hundred men, and " the gallant regiment " was awarded " fresh laurels" there, 
in the official report of General Hatch, the division general. At the first day s battle at Gettysburg, the Four 
teenth attained a place in history by its efficiency under fire, the ability of its colonel, and its important service 
rendered there ; its tactical manoeuvres and prompt action on that field are mentioned in every account of that battle. 

The regiment was one of the very first to open fire in that engagement, and, in connection with the Ninety- 
fifth New York and Sixth Wisconsin forming a demi-brigade under command of Fowler distinguished itself 
at the railroad cut in the capture of Davis s Mississippi Brigade. 

The regiment was favorably known in winter-quarters as well as on the field ; and while encamped near Culpeper 
in 1864-5, tne " Brooklyn Boys" gave a series of Minstrel Entertainments, which were enjoyed and patronized by 
the Corps, from headquarters to the wagon train. The " Fourteenth " fought in the Wilderness Campaign, 
many of the men falling at Spotsylvania while expecting hourly the orders to march homeward for muster-out. 
On May 22, 1864, the welcome order was received, and the bronzed and battle-scarred battalion returned to 
Brooklyn, where it was greeted with the grandest ovation of the war. 



210 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



EIGHTY-SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY --" STEUBEN RANGERS. 
WARD S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. BENAJAH F. BAILEY 

(2) COL. BENJAMIN L. HIGGINS. 



(3) COL. JACOB II. LANSING. 

(4) COL. NATHAN II. VINCENT. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 



I 



I 



2 
2 
I 

3 




I? 

12 

16 

6 

J 9 

i5 
26 

J 7 

13 

18 


3 
17 

J 3 
16 

7 
J 9 

i5 
28 

X 9 
M 

21 









I 



I 




9 
M 
18 
ii 
10 
8 
16 

20 
I I 

12 


* 

9 
M 
18 
1 1 
10 
8 

J 7 
20 

\ i 
J 3 


12 
130 
124 
136 

"5 

131 

124 

i39 
i33 
i39 

i 2 5 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


T . 


K 


Totals 


i3 


159 


172 


2 


129 


*3 T 


1,318 





172 killed = 13.0 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 611 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), n. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 5 

Petersburg, Va. (assault 1864) 4 

Jones House, Va., June 22, 1864 i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 12 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Boydton Road, Va 6 

Hatcher s Run, Va. (1865) : 

Farmville, Va 3 

Place unknown 2 



BATTLES. K. icM. W. 

Manassas, Va 23 

Chancellorsville, Va 14 

Beverly Ford, Va 6 

Gettysburg, Pa 20 

Mine Run, Va 6 

Wilderness, Va 1 6 

Po River, Va 32 

Spotsylvania, Va. 15 

North Anna, Va 3 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Present, also, at Fredericksburg ; Wapping Heights ; Kelly s Ford ; Strawberry Plains ; Poplar Spring Church ; 
White Oak Road ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized in October, 1861, at Elmira, N. Y., from companies recruited principally in Steuben 
county, with some from Chemung and Onondaga. After leaving Elmira the regiment was stationed at Washing 
ton, where it performed guard duty for several months. It took the field in August, 1862, in Piatt s Brigade 
- and was engaged at Manassas, where it lost 13 killed, 67 wounded, and 38 missing. At Fredericksburg, then 
in Whipple s Division, Third Corps, it was slightly engaged, a few men being wounded there ; but at Chancellors 
ville the Eighty-sixth was in the thickest of the fight ; in that battle the intrepid Lieutenant- Colonel Chapin was 
killed, and Major Higgins was seriously wounded. With sadly diminished ranks the men marched on the 
field at Gettysburg, where they again faced the enemy s rifles until one-third of their number had fallen ; its loss 
there was u killed, 51 wounded, and 4 missing. The regiment reenlisted, and in January, 1864, went home on 
the customary veterans furlough. Having been transferred to the Second Corps, it fought under Hancock in the 
campaigns of 1864. It sustained itself gallantly in a sharp fight at the Po River, losing 96 men there, and suf 
fering the severest percentage of loss of any regiment in that action. It lost 201 men during the first three weeks 
of the Wilderness campaign May 6th to the 25th. Its casualties during the siege of Petersburg were also 
very large ; Lieutenant-Colonel Stafford, a brave and popular officer was killed there. The Eighty-sixth fairly^ 
earned its reputation as "the fighting regiment of the Southern Tier." 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 217 

EIGHTY-EIGHTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
IRISH BRIGADE HANCOCK S DIVISION -- SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY M. UAKEH. (8) COL. PATRICK KKLLY, B. . (Killed). (8) COL. DENIS F. BURKE ; BVT. BRIG.-<JKN. 

Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 15 136 151 

Died of disease, accidents, etc 3 51 54 

Died in Confederate prisons 1 8 1 8 



Totals ........................ 1 8 205 223 



Battles. Killed. IVountied* Afissittf.-^ Total. 

Fair Oaks, Va ................................................... 6 19 . . 25 

Gaines s Mill, Va .................................................. i . . i 

Savage Station, Va ............................................... i 20 55 76 

White Oak Swamp, Va ............................................ 2 i o 7 19 

Malvern Hill, Va ................................................ 5 28 . . 33 

Antietam, Md ................................................... 27 75 . . 102 

Fredericksburg, Va ............................................... 17 97 13 127 

Chancellorsville, Va .............................................. 3 23 20 46 

Gettysburg, Pa. (2 Cos.) .......................................... 7 17 4 28 

Bristoe Station, Va ................................................. i i 2 

Mine Run, Va .................................................... . . i i 

Wilderness, Va .................................................. 10 38 4 52 

Spotsylvania, Va., May i2th ....................................... i 15 3 19 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 1 8th ....................................... i 5 6 

Totopotomoy, Va .................................................. 10 .. 10 

Cold Harbor, Va ................................................ 3 . 1 1 

Siege of Petersburg, Va ........................................... 9 41 32 82 

Deep Bottom, Va. (5 Cos.), August 14-18, 1864 ...................... i 12 13 

Ream s Station, Va ................................................ 3 12 15 

Boydton Road, Va ............................................... 3 1 1 14 

Sailor s Creek, Va ................................................ i i 

Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals ................... 97 435 5 2 68 4 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Hatcher s Run ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 
NOTES. Fourth regiment, Irish Brigade ; a brigade which never lost a flag, although it captured over twenty 
stands of colors from the enemy. At Fredericksburg the Eighty-eighth, in company with the brigade, partici 
pated in the gallant but unsuccessful assault on Marye s Heights. The brigade was then commanded by General 
Meagher, and the division by General Hancock. While in line at Fredericksburg awaiting the order for the assault, 
little sprigs of green were distributed among the men, every officer and man in the brigade, including Meagher 
and his staff, placing one in his cap. After the assault had failed, a long, well-aligned row of dead lay on the crest 
of the hill within a few yards of the Confederate breastworks, and by each pale dead face was a sprig of Irish 
green. The brigade became so reduced by losses that the Sixty-third, Sixty-ninth, and Eighty-eighth were, 
shortly before Gettysburg, consolidated into two companies each. At that battle, the brigade halted for a few 
moments, just as it neared the " wheatfield," and knelt with uncovered heads while Father Corby, the Chaplain of 
the Eighty-eighth, gave them his benediction ; the men, rising to their feet, went into action immediately. 
Colonel Kelly, who commanded the brigade at Gettysburg, was afterwards killed in the assault on Petersburg, 
where he was again in command of the brigade. Major William Horgan fell at Fredericksburg in the desperate 
assault on Marye s Heights. 



218 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

NINETY-THIRD NEW YORK INFANTRY -- "MORGAN RIFLES." 
HAYS S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION - - SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN S. CKOCKER ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. (3) COL. SAMUEL McCONIHE ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 

(2) COL. BENJAMIN C. BUTLER. (4) COL. HAVILAND GIFFORD. 



Losses. 


Officers. 

6 


En. Men 
I2O 

118 

12 


Total. 
126 
I2O 
12 















Totals 8 250 258 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

Harrison s Landing, Va <. 3 . . 3 

Wilderness, Va 42 213 5 260 

Spotsylvania, Va 3 37 5 45 

North Anna, Va 4 17 2 23 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 10 2 14 

Cold Harbor, Va i 4 . . 5 

Assault on Petersburg, Va. (1864) 5 20 1 1 36 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 13 23 21 57 

Deep Bottom, Va 2 18 51 71 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 3 . . 3 

Boydton Road, Va 4 18 30 52 

Sailor s Creek, Va 5 30 . . 35 

*Includes the mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 8 1 396 127 604 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Williamsburg ; Tunstall s Station ; Antietam ; Strawberry Plains ; Peebles s Farm ; 
Hatcher s Run ; Jettersville ; High Bridge ; Appomattox. 

Present, also, as Headquarters Guard, at Seven Days Battle ; Fredericksburg ; Chancellorsville ; Gettysburg ; 
Mine Run. 

NOTES. Organized at Albany in January, 1862, from companies recruited principally in Washington county. 
It was formed by uniting four companies of sharpshooters, which had been recruited through the efforts of Lieu 
tenant-Colonel B. C. Butler, with companies formed under the superintendence of Colonel Crocker. The regi 
ment left Albany on the i4th of February, 1862, with 998 rank and file, going to New York, where it encamped 
on Riker s Island until March 7th, when it went to Washington. Upon its arrival there it was attached to 
Palmer s Brigade of Casey s Division, and on March 30, 1862 embarked at Alexandria for the Peninsula campaign. 
The Ninety-third was detailed, May 21, 1862, as a guard at General Headquarters, and was retained on that duty 
successively by Generals Burnside, Hooker and Meade. The regiment was among the first to reenlist, going 
home in January, 1864, on the usual thirty days furlough allowed to veteran or reenlisted regiments. After nearly 
two years service at Army Headquarters, it was ordered on April 19, 1864, to report to General Birney s Division for 
duty, where it was assigned to Hays s(2d) Brigade. Under command of Colonel Crocker, the regiment earned new 
laurels at the Wilderness, in which it lost 17 officers and 243 men killed and wounded, out of 433 who were 
engaged, its gallantry in battle eliciting the hearty thanks of its division commander. The Ninety-third was a 
great favorite at headquarters on account of its superior discipline, drill, and general efficiency. Having reenlisted 
at the expiration of its three years term, it preserved its organization through the war, and was mustered out 
June 29, 1865. 



THRKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



MNF.TY-SKVKNTH NKNV VOKK INFANTRY "CONKLING RIFLES." 

BAXTER S BRIGADE -- ROBINSON S DIVISION- FIRST CORPS. 



0) COL. CHARLES WHEELOCK ; BVT. BKKI.-GKN. (Died). 



(2) Coi.. JOHN P. 8POFFORD; BVT. BUIO.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEAHK, ACCIDENTH, IN PUIHON, &r. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 




3 
i 

i 

2 
2 






9 
7 
3 
5 

5 
26 

16 

17 
16 

2 5 


I 
IO 

17 

13 

18 

16 

27 
18 

19 
16 

26 


I 







* 






5 
14 

5 
1 1 

1 6 

4 

!3 

19 

2 3 
16 


I 

S 

M 

5 
1 1 

16 
M 

3 

iQ 

23 
16 

57 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


T 


K 


Totals 


I 2 


169 


181 


I 


56 





Total 
Enrollment. 



9 

187 

20 1 

2 <5 

222 
l8 9 
222 
2O4 
220 
20 7 
219 

2,105 



K.&M.W. 

White Oak Swamp, Va. (1864) i 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) i 2 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 6 

Weldon Railroad, Va 10 

Hatcher s Run, Va 

Gravelly Run, Va 2 

Five Forks, Va $ 

Picket Line, Va i 



Total of killed and wounded, 704 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 51. 
BATTLES. K.&M.W. BATTM - 

Manassas, Va 15 

South Mountain, Md 3 

Antietam, Md 37 

Fredericksburg, Va 6 

Gettysburg, Pa 1 6 

Wilderness, Va 25 

Spotsylvania, Va 14 

North Anna, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 1 1 

Present, also, at Cedar Mountain; Rappahannock ; Thoroughfare Gap ; Chancellorsville ; Mine Run; 
Totopotomoy ; White Oak Road ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Known also as the Third Oneida, being composed almost wholly of men from Oneida and Herki- 
mer counties. It was mustered in at Boonville, N. V., on Febniary 19, 1862, leaving that place on March i2th. 
It arrived at the National Capital on the zoth, where it went into camp at Fort Corcoran. In April, 1862, it was 
assigned to DuryeVs Brigade, and in May took the field with Ricketts s Division of McDowell s Corps. The 
Ninety-seventh was under fire at Cedar Mountain and at Rappahannock, losing a few wounded men in those en 
gagements ; but at Manassas, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Spofford, it was actively engaged, losing 7 
killed, 42 wounded, and 62 captured or missing ; total, 1 1 1. The regiment suffered its severest loss at Antietam, 
where it *as commanded by Major Northrup, its casualties in that action amounting to 24 killed, 74 wounded, 
and 9 missing; total, 107. The Ninety-seventh then in Robinson s Division, Baxter s Brigade made a 
gallant and successful charge at Gettysburg, capturing the colors of the Twentieth North Carolina and 382 men. 
Its loss in that battle was 12 killed, 36 wounded, and 78 missing or captured. The regiment was transferred to 
the Fifth Corps in March, 1864, and served afterwards in that corps until the end of the war. It was hotly 
engaged at the battle of the Wilderness, in which it lost 1 5 killed, 71 wounded, and 13 missing ; and at Spotsylvania, 
where it lost 6 killed, 67 wounded, and 2 missing. In its various battles two color-bearers were killed and three 
wounded, while twenty more were killed or wounded in the color-guard. The Ninety-seventh served in the 
Second Division (First Corps), known successively as Ricketts s, Gibbon s, Robinson s, and Crawford s (5th A. C.). 



220 REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

ONE HUNDREDTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
PLAISTKD S BRIGADE TERRY S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES M. BROWN (Killed). (2) Coi.. GEORGE B. DANDY, &. .; BVT. BRIG.-GEN., U. S. A. 



Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. 

Killed and mortally wounded 12 182 194 

Died of disease, accidents, etc i 131 i3 2 

Died in Confederate prisons 71 7 x 

Totals _3_ 384 _397 

Battles. Killed. Wounded* Missing. \ Total. 

On Picket, Va., May 30, 1862 2 3 .. 5 

Fair Oaks, Va 19 86 7 1 J 7 6 

Yorktown, Va., Nov. 15, 1862 i 3 3 7 

Folly Island, S. C i i 

Fort Wagner, S. C., July 1 8, 1863 49 97 2 9 J 75 

Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C 1 1 3 J 7 49 

Walthall Junction, Va 2 15 4 21 

Proctor s Creek, Va ) g iofi 
Drewry s Bluff, Va. ) 

Strawberry Plains, Va i 5 6 

Deep Bottom, Va 6 50 25 81 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 2 3 2 7 

Chaffin s Farm, Va i i 2 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 i 7 

Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 i 13 3 J 7 

Fort Gregg, Va., April 2, 1865 14 5 8 7 2 

*Includes tho mortally wounded, tlncludes the captured. 

Totals 1 20 498 288 906 

Present, also, at AVilliamsburg ; Bottom s Bridge ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; Wood s Cross Roads ; 
Cole s Island ; Morris Island ; Bermuda Hundred ; Grover House ; Hatcher s Run ; Pursuit of Lee ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The One Hundredth was recruited in Buffalo, and on March 7, 1862, started from there, 960 
strong, arriving at Washington March i2th. It embarked on March 2ist for Fort Monroe, where it joined 
General McClellan s Army, having been assigned to Naglee s (ist) Brigade, Casey s (2d) Division, Fourth Corps. 
Colonel Brown was killed at Fair Oaks, after which Colonel George B. Dandy, of the Regular Army, was assigned 
to the command of the regiment. 

The One Hundredth was present at all the operations in Ch -leston Harbor in June, 1863, and, under com 
mand of Colonel Dandy, shared in the desperate assault on Fort Wagner. In this action the regiment behaved 
with signal gallantry, and although the attack was unsuccessful, the flag of the One Hundredth the one pre 
sented by the Board of Trade, Buffalo was planted on the fort, the daring color-sergeant falling dead beside it. 
In May, 1864 then in Plaisted s (3d) Brigade, Terry s (ist) Division, Tenth Corps the regiment sailed up 
the James River with Butler s Army, and was subsequently engaged in all its battles. In December, 1864 the 
Tenth Corps was discontinued, and the regiment became a part of Plaisted s (3d) Brigade, Foster s (ist) Division, 
Twenty-fourth Corps. At the Fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, it made a gallant and successful assault on Fort 
Gregg, in which Major James H. Dandy, an able and meritorious officer, was killed. In July, 1865, the regi 
ment was consolidated with the One Hundred and Forty-eighth and One Hundred and Fifty-eighth New York 
Volunteers, and on August 28th, following, was mustered out of service. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



221 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"2o ST. LAWRENCE." 
MORRIS S BRIGADE -- RICKETTS S DIVISION- SIXTH 



(1) COL. EDWAKD C. JAMES. 



(2) COL. FREDERICK K. EMBKICK. 



(*) COL. ANDREW X. McDOXALD. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOI-NDS. 


DIED or DIHEADE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IIIHON, Ac. 


Totul 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( >fflrera. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 



2 



I 

2 

I 
I 

2 


I 

15 
I I 

16 
M 

12 

7 

10 

15 

10 

16 


2 

15 
3 

16 

15 

14 
8 
1 1 

5 

12 

16 


I 





I 
I 
I 





I 

*5 

20 

15 

16 

18 

M 

i? 
16 

18 
1 6 


2 

5 

20 

15 

17 
1( ; 
5 

7 
16 

18 
16 


5 
136 
148 

*43 
138 

37 
128 

3 1 

i34 
132 

I2 5 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


127 


37 


4 


1 66 


170 


i>3 6 7 





137 killed 10.0 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 492 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 52. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Fairmont, W. Va 3 

Martinsburg, \V. Va i 

Culpeper, Va., Oct. 1 1 , 1863 3 

Mine Run, Va 3 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 13 

Cold Harbor, Va 35 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 i 



BATTLED. K.A-M.\\. 

Monocacy, Md 30 

Charlestown, W. Va 2 

Opequon, Va 1 1 

Fisher s Hill, Va i 

Cedar Creek, Va 15 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 12 

Sailor s Creek, Va i 

On Picket, Va., Oct. 31,1 863 i 



Present, also, at Wapping Heights ; Siege of Petersburg ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The One Hundred and Sixth was a St. Lawrence county regiment, organized at Ogdensburg, 
N. Y. It was mustered into the United States service on August 27, 1862, for three years. In September, 1862, 
it was ordered to New Creek, W. Va. Companies I) and F were captured, April 29, 1863, at Fairmont, W. Va., 
where they defended a railroad bridge for several hours against a large force of Confederates. The captured 
men were immediately released on parole. The regiment left North Mountain, June 13, 1863, and, with the 
other troops in that vicinity, retired before the advance of Lee s army. It joined the Army of the Potomac, 
July 10, 1863, while near Frederick, Md., and with other new material was organized as the Third Division 
(Carr s) of the Third Corps. This division was transferred, in March, 1864, to the Sixth Corps, and its com 
mand given to General Ricketts. 

While in the Sixth Corps the regiment saw hard service and almost continuous fighting. At ( old Harbor it 
lost 23 killed, 88 wounded, and 23 missing, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Townsend and three other officers 
being among the killed. The Corps was ordered soon after to Maryland, where, at the battle of Monocacy, the 
regiment sustained another severe loss. It was actively engaged in the Shenandoah Valley, in all the battles of 
the Corps, and then, returning to Petersburg, participated in the final campaign. At Spotsylvania the casualties 
in the regiment aggregated 6 killed and 32 wounded ; at the Opequon, 6 killed, 45 wounded, and 3 missing ; and 
at Cedar Creek, 8 killed and 45 wounded. General Ricketts was wounded at Cedar Creek, after which the 
division was commanded by General Seymour. 



222 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND NINTH NEW YOEK INFANTEY. 
HARTRANFT S BRIGADE WILLCOX S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. BENJAMIN F. TRACY ; BVT. BRIO.-GEN. 



(2) COL. ISAAC S. CATLIN ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 






2 




2 





I 




18 

12 

15 
17 

17 
17 

M 
28 
10 
12 




18 

12 

17 

7 
i? 
1 9 
M 

28 

10 

13 











17 

M 

J 9 

M 
14 
M 

12 
21 
14 

2 5 




17 

14 

J 9 
M 
M 

14 

I 2 
21 
M 

2 5 


17 

127 

I 3 6 

54 

124 

I2 5 
123 

J 35 
130 

136 
146 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


I 60 


65 





164 


164 


i,353 





165 killed = 12. i per cent. 

Total of killed and wounded, 614 died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 41. 
BATTLES. K. & M.W. BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



Petersburg Trenches, Va 12 

Weldon Railroad, Va 9 

Poplar Spring Church. Va i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 7 

On Picket, Va i 



Wilderness, Va 21 

Spotsylvania, Va 48 

Hanovertown, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va., June 1 7, 1 864 45 

Petersburg, Va., Mine Explosion 15 

Present, also, at Ny River ; North Anna ; Totopotomoy ; Bethesda Church ; Boydton Road ; Hatcher s Run ; 
Fort Stedman. 

NOTES. Organized at Binghamton, N. Y., and mustered into the United States service on August 28, 1862. 
The companies were raised in the Twenty-fourth Senatorial District Broome, Tompkins and Tioga counties. 
The regiment left Binghamton promptly, proceeding to Annapolis Junction, Md., where it was placed on guard- 
duty along the line of railroad to Washington, a few of the companies being stationed at Laurel, Md. It 
remained there the rest of the year and during all of 1863. In the spring of 1864, the regiment was ordered to 
join the Ninth Corps, then assembling at Annapolis, and it accordingly took the field in the ranks of that battle- 
tried command. It was assigned to Hartranft s (ist) Brigade, Willcox s (3d) Division aftervvard s Harriman s 
Brigade of Willcox s (ist) Division. Colonel Tracy resigned May 20, 1864, and Colonel Catlin, a gallant and 
meritorious officer, succeeded to the command. The corps left Annapolis, April 23, 1864, and crossing the Rapi- 
dan on May 51)1, the One Hundred and Ninth was engaged the next day at the Wilderness, in its first battle, 
where it lost 1 1 killed, 64 wounded, and i missing. In the charge of the Ninth Corps at Spotsylvania, the regi 
ment lost 25 killed, 86 wounded, and 29 missing; in the assault on Petersburg, June 17, 1864, 26 killed, 81 
wounded, and 20 missing; at the Mine Explosion, July 30, 1864, n killed, 24 wounded, and 18 missing; and 
at the Weldon Railroad, August 19, 1864, 7 killed, 12 wounded, and i missing. The regiment was under fire 
at the battle on the Boydton Road, October 27, 1864, with a slight loss in wounded and missing, but none killed. 
It suffered severely while in the trenches before Petersburg, where for several weeks it lost men daily, either 
killed or wounded. During its eleven months in the field the hard fighting cost the regiment 614 men in killed 
and wounded, aside from the missing or prisoners. It was mustered out of service June 4, 1865. 



TlIKKE liUNDKED Fl<iHTlN(J KKiil.MKM- 



223 



ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
WILLAKD S BRIGADE HAYS S DIVISION --SECOND C 



(1) COLONEL JESSE 8EUO1M-: 



(2) COL. CLINTON D. McDOUUALL; BvT.Bmu.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIKII UK \\ ..i M.- 


DIKD or I)I*KA 
t )fll< % om. 


SB, ACCIDENT*, IN PitinoN, &<. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Offloen. 


Men. 


Total. 


Men. 


Total. 


Kiclil and Staff 


2 

2 
2 

I 

3 







I 
27 
10 

5 

22 

28 

4 
31 

22 

9 
21 


I 
2 9 
IO 

7 
^4 
29 

i/ 
31 

22 

9 

2 I 






I 



1 







22 

I I 

18 

3 
7 
5 
3 
16 

1 8 
1 8 




22 
I I 

1 8 

3 

7 
16 

3 
16 

18 

18 

i So 


3 
199 

142 

77 
1 86 

172 
1 80 
1 88 

^3 
169 

7 
1,780 


Company \ 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


210 


22O 


2 


178 





220 killed == 12.3 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 778 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 74. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 1 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 5 

Ream s Station, Va i 

White Oak Road, Va 7 

Sutherland Station, Va 10 

On Picket, June 1 1 , 1 864 i 

Morton s Ford ; Deep Bottom ; Strawberry Plains ; 



BATTLE*). K.&M.W. 

Bolivar Heights, Va 5 

Gettysburg, Pa 88 

Bristoe Station, Va 4 

Wilderness, Va 59 

Spotsylvania, Va 15 

North Anna, Va i 

Totopotomoy, Va 4 

Present, also, at Auburn ; Cold Harbor ; Mine Run 
Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Auburn, N. Y., from companies recruited in Cayuga and Wayne counties. The regi 
ment was mustered into service on August 20, 1862, and left Auburn the following day for Harper s Ferry, where, 
after joining that ill-fated garrison, it was included in its surrender shortly afterwards. The men were released 
on parole, but were not declared exchanged until December, 1862, when they entered the field again, and went 
into winter quarters at Centreville, Va., remaining there several months in a brigade commanded by 
General Alex. Hays. On June 25, 1863, the brigade joined the Second Corps which was then marching by 
on its way to Gettysburg. The regiment left two companies on guard at Accotink Bridge ; with the remaining 
eight companies, numbering 390 men, it was engaged at Gettysburg on the second day of the battle, in the bril 
liant and successful charge of Willard s Brigade, losing there 58 killed, 177 wounded, and 14 missing ; total, 249. 
The regiment did some more good fighting at the Wilderness, where it lost 42 killed, 1 19 wounded, and i 7 miss 
ing ; total, 178 over half of its effective strength. Its casualties in the fighting around Spotsylvania amounted 
to 22 killed, 37 wounded, and 13 missing. From Gettysburg until the end, the regiment fought under Hancock 
in the Second Corps, participating in every battle of that command. While on the Gettysburg campaign, and 
subsequently at Bristoe Station, Mine Run and Morton s Ford, the regiment was attached to the Third Brigade, 
Third Division (Alex. Hays s). Just before the Wilderness campaign it was placed in Frank s (3(1) Brigade, 
Barlow s (ist) Division. This brigade (Frank s) was also composed entirely of New York troops, the 39th, 
1 1 ith, 125111 and i26th, to which were added in April, 1864, the 52d and 57th ; and, later on, the 7th N. Y. ; 
all crack fighting regiments. 



224 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWELFTH NEW YORK INF. " CHAUTAUQUA KEG T." 

* 

CURTIS S BRIGADE AMES S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JERMIAH C. DRAKE (Killed). 



(2) COL. JOHN F. SMITH (Killed). 



(3) COL. EPHRAIM A. LUDWICK. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 
I 



I 





I 
I 
I 

I 




10 

7 

i? 

18 

M 

12 
12 

T 9 

3 

IO 


3 
ii 

7 
18 

18 
M 

12 

13 
20 

4 
ii 


2 






I 







I 

12 
26 
2O 

M 
26 
12 

18 

16 

25 

20 


3 

12 
26 
2O 

14 

27 
12 

18 
16 

25 
20 


16 
144 
136 
171 

146 

154 

143 
145 

J 57 

*33 
136 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Toials 


9 


122 


T 3 J 


3 


190 


193 


1,481 





Total of killed and wounded, 451 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 23. 
BATTLES. K. & M. W. BATTLES. 

I 



Deserted House, Va 

Suffolk, Va 

Carrsville, Va 

Black s Island, S. C 
Fort Wagner, S. C . 

Olustee, Fla 

Proctor s Creek, Va 



K.&M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 54 

3 Siege of Petersburg, Va 18 

i Chaffm s Farm, Va 14 

1 Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 1 1 

2 Hatcher s Run, Va i 

i Fort Fisher, N. C 15 

3 Faissons, N.C i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 4 Picket Line i 

Present, also, at Seabrook ; John s Island ; Petersburg Mine ; Cape Fear ; Fort Anderson ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Upon its organization, the command of the regiment was tendered to Colonel Drake, who was then 
a captain in the Forty-ninth New York Infantry. He was a graduate of Rochester University, a clergyman, and 
had left the pastorale of a Baptist Church in Westfield, N Y., at the first call for troops. The One Hundred and 
Twelfth was organized at Jamestown, N. Y., from companies raised in Chautauqua county, and was mustered into 
the United States service, September ii, 1862. The regiment embarked, September 16, 1862, for Fort Monroe, 
proceeding from there to Suffolk, Va., where it sustained a severe loss by disease. In June, 1863 then in 
Foster s Brigade of Getty s Division the regiment marched up the Peninsula on a campaign memorable for 
the heat and long, rapid marches. In August, 1863, it went to Folly Island, S. C., taking part in the operations 
about Charleston Harbor; then, on February 23, 1864, sailed for Florida, encamping at Jacksonville until April 
2ist, when the Division embarked for the battle-fields of Virginia. Arriving at Yorktown, it was assigned to 
Drake s (2d) Brigade, Ames s (3d) Division, Tenth Corps, Army of the James, and soon after sailed up the 
James River to Bermuda Hundred, where it disembarked on the 6th of May. Lieutenant-Colonel Carpenter, a 
very popular officer, was mortally wounded at Drewry s Bluff (May i6th), and Colonel Drake, who was in com 
mand of the brigade, was killed at Cold Harbor, where, in an assault, the regiment lost 28 killed, "140 wounded, 
and 12 missing. At Chaffin s Farm, its casualty list showed 6 killed, 38 wounded, and 16 missing; and 
at Darbytown Road, 4 killed, 28 wounded, and 3 missing. In December, 1864, it sailed with Ames s 
Division to Fort Fisher, N. C., where it took a prominent part in the assault on that stronghold, and where 
Colonel Smith was killed. 



TIIKKK HUNDRED FKJHTIM; RBODOEMTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
BEAL S BRIGADE- - DWKJHT S DIVISION- - NINETEENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ELISIIA B. SMITH (Killed). 



(2) COL. SAMUEL It. PKR I.KK ; BVT. BRIO.-GBN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOI:NDS. 


DIED OF DIXKASK, AmiiENTH, IN I KISON, Ac. 


K 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Stall 


I 



I 
I 
I 



I 

2 

2 







14 
10 

12 

16 

10 

5 

IO 

9 
8 

8 


I 

14 
1 1 

13 

l? 
10 

16 

12 
I I 

8 

8 




I 





I 










24 
22 

21 
2O 

1 5 
4 

10 
22 
2O 
24 




25 

22 

21 
20 

16 

M 
10 

22 
20 

24 




B 


C . 


D . 


E . 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


112 


( 21 


2 


1 9 2 


194 


I 





Total 
Enrollment. 



16 

13 
20 

3 

15 
10 

20 
I0 5 

I 10 

106 
1 06 



. 34 



121 killed 10.6 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 423. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M.NV 



Fort Bisland, IA 3 

Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863 21 

Port Hudson Trenches, I^a 7 

Sabine Cross Roads, La 2 

Pleasant Hill, I^i 3 

Present, also, at Cane River, Mansura ; Fisher s Hill. 



Opequon, Va 44 

Cedar Creek, Va 38 

Guerillas i 

Place unknown 



NOTES. Organized at Norwich, N. Y., leaving there on September 6, 1862, and journeying to Binghamton 
on canal boats, a long line of them being used for the purpose. Seven of the companies had been recruited in 
Chenango county, and three in Madison. The regiment sailed from Haltimore on November 6, 1862, for New 
Orleans, where it was assigned to Weitzel s Brigade, Augur s Division, Nineteenth Corps, and stationed at 
Brashear City, La. 

Its first experience under fire was at Fort Bisland, April 12, 1863, where several men were wounded, 
some of them mortally. After the Teche Campaign, a march through "the garden of Ixniisiana,"- the One 
Hundred and Fourteenth, on May 30, 1863, joined its Corps, which had already invested Port Hudson, 
and for forty days participated in the incessant fighting which echoed through the magnolia woods about the 
works. In the grand assault of June i4th, Colonel Smith, while in command of the brigade, was killed. The 
total loss of the regiment during the siege of Port Hudson was i i killed, 60 wounded, and 2 missing. 

On March 15, 1864, in Dwight s (ist) Brigade, Emory s (ist) Division, it started on Banks s Red River 
campaign, traversing the Teche country for the sixth time, and fighting at Sabine Cross Roads, where Lieutenant- 
Colonel Morse, the regimental commandant, was wounded. The Nineteenth Corps having been ordered to Vir 
ginia, the One Hundred and Fourteenth embarked for Washington on July 15, 1864, and after marching through 
Maryland, fought under Sheridan in his famous Shenandoah campaign against Early. At the battle of the Ope 
quon, the regiment lost 185 men killed and wounded three-fifths of those engaged eliciting by its gallantry 
a complimentary notice from the Division General. At Cedar Creek it lost 21 killed, 86 wounded, and 8 miss 



ing. The regiment was mustered out at Elmira on June 17, 1865. 



15 



226 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY -"IRON HEARTS." 

BARTON S BRIGADE TURNER S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COLONEL SIMEON SAMMON. 



(3) COLONEL NATHAN J. JOHNSON. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Mn. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 
I 

2 

* 


I 
I 




I 


1 
20 
IO 

18 

IO 

1 1 

10 

13 

12 

J 3 

10 


I 

21 
II 
2O 
IO 
II 
I I 

14 
12 

13 
II 




* 
* 






2 

19 

12 

15 
2O 

25 
I? 

17 

J 9 

27 

15 


2 

T 9 

12 

*5 
20 

2 5 
i? 
J 7 

r 9 

27 

IS 


I? 

108 
no 

TI 3 

"5 

129 

ii) 
124 
114 

3 1 
118 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H. 


j , 


K 


Totals 


7 


128 


!35 





1 88 


1 88 


1,196 





135 killed = ii. 2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 494 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 45. 



BATTLES. K. ikM. W. 

Harper s Ferry, Va i 

Olustee, Fla 54 

Lake City, Fla i 

Chesterfield Heights, Va 10 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 3 

Proctor s Creek, Va i 

Bermuda Hundred, Va i 



BATTLES. K. & M, W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 14 

Deep Bottom, Va *, ., 17 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 6 

Darbytown Road, Va 7 

Fort Fisher, N. C 13 

On Picket, July 26, 1864 i 

Present, also, at Petersburg Mine ; Fort Anderson ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Recruited in July and August, 1865, from the counties of Saratoga, Montgomery, Fulton and 
Hamilton. Leaving the rendezvous at Fonda on the 291)1 of August, it arrived two days later at Sandy Hook, 
Md., where arms and equipments were furnished. Two weeks afterwards the entire regiment was captured at the 
surrender of Harper s Ferry, and after being paroled was ordered to Chicago to await exchange. During 1863, 
the regiment was stationed at Hilton Head and Beaufort, S. C., and thence, on February 5, 1864, sailed for 
Florida. At the battle of Olustee, Fla , the regiment made a gallant fight, losing over 300 in killed, wounded or 
missing. Leaving Jacksonville, Fla., on the i5th of April, 1864, the One Hundred and Fifteenth sailed with the 
Tenth Corps for Virginia, where it joined General Butler s Army of the James and was assigned to Barton s (2d) Brig 
ade, Turner s (2<1) Division, Tenth Corps. In the actions around Drewry s Bluff and Bermuda Hundred, May 6-16, 
1864, it lost 6 killed, 87 wounded, and 7 missing; total, 100. While at Cold Harbor the brigade was attached 
temporarily to the Eighteenth Corps, but on its return to the James it rejoined the Tenth Corps and went into 
position before Petersburg. Recrossing the James, the regiment was engaged at Deep Bottom, where it lost 5 
killed, 44 wounded, and 24 missing ; total, 73. At the battle of Chaffin s Farm, the regiment was in the fight at 
Fort Gilmer, where it lost half of its number present in action ; on October 27, 1864, it joined in the advance on 
Richmond on the Darbytown Road, in which affair the One Hundred and Fifteenth sustained considerable loss 
from a volley fired into them, through mistake, by the Ninth Maine. In December, 1864, the Tenth Corps was 
discontinued, and the regiment was transferred to Ames s (2d) Division of the newly- formed Twenty-fourth Corps. 
At Fort Fisher the regiment fought in Bell s (3d) Brigade, Ames s Division, many of the lives lost there occurring 
at the explosion of the magazine the day after the Fort was taken. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 



THKKK HUXDKKD FIGHTING KUGIMKNTH. 



227 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
CURTIS S BRIGADE TURNER S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM R. PKASE, MI. tf., B. .; BVT. BIUU.-GEN. (2) COL. ALVIN WHITE. (3) COL. RUFl S DA(i(JETT ; UVT. BKIU.-CEN. 



COM PA NIBS. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OK DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PHISON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 



I I 

5 

10 

14 
1 1 

I 2 

>4 

1 2 

17 
20 


Field and Staff 




2 
I 



I 



2 

I 








10 
IO 
IO 

I I 

1 2 
1 1 
IO 
14 

5 
2O 


* 

I 2 
I I 
IO 
I 2 
I 2 

3 

I I 

4 

5 

20 





1 











. . 
i i 

4 

10 

4 
i i 

I 2 

4 
1 2 

7 
20 


16 

36 
M3 
39 
45 
34 
5 2 
45 
33 
55 
47 




B 


c 


I) 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 




7 


I2 3 


130 


I 


35 


136 


>,445 





Total of killed and wounded, 479 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 
BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. 

Morris Island, S. C i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 25 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va. (assault 1 864) 8 



M \v 



Siege of Petersburg, Va ..................... 23 

Chaffin s Farm, Va ........................ 28 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 .......... 1 1 

Fort Fisher, N. C ......................... 30 



Present, also, at the Siege of Suffolk; Battery Wagner; Seabrook ; John s Island ; Swift Creek; Petersburg 
Mine ; Bermuda Hundred ; Fort Anderson ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Organized in Oneida county in August, 1862. It was stationed at Tennallytown, Md., until April, 
1863, when it went to Suffolk, Va. After participating in the Peninsular campaign of 1863, it joined the troops 
on Folly Island, S. C., where it took part in the siege of Fort Wagner and the operations about Charleston 
Harbor. In April, 1864, the One Hundred and Seventeenth sailed for Virginia, and joined the Army of the 
James, having been assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division (Turner s), Tenth Corps. It landed at 
Bermuda Hundred on the 6th of May, and ten days later it was hotly engaged at Drewry s Bluff, where Colonel 
White was wounded. Loss: 20 killed, 62 wounded, and 7 missing. At Chaffin s Farm the regiment fought 
gallantly, losing 15 killed, 76 wounded, and 33 missing. At the battle on the Darbytown Road, October 27, 
1864 still in the First Brigade (General Curtis s), Second Division (General Foster s) the regiment sustained 
a loss of 6 killed, 42 wounded, and 4 missing; total, 52. In December the Tenth Corps was discontinued, and 
Curtis s Brigade was placed in Ames s (2d) Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps. On December 7, 1864, the 
regiment sailed with Butler s Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., where it disembarked ; Captain Stevens, with 
Companies H, and B, made a short leconnoissance in which they intercepted and captured a battalion of 230 
men belonging to the Fourth North Carolina Reserves. The troops re-embarking returned to Virginia, but were 
immediately ordered back to Fort Fisher, this second expedition being under the command of General Terry, 
under whose direction a successful assault was made, in which the One Hundred and Seventeenth took a con 
spicuous part and sustained a heavy loss. After sharing in Terry s North Carolina campaign of 1865, then in 
Daggett s ( ist) Brigade, Ames s (2d) Division, Tenth Corps, the regiment was left on duty at Raleigh, N. C., 
where it was mustered out on June 9, 1865. The recruits and reenlisted men (about 250) were transferred to 
the Fortieth New York. While at Cold Harbor the regiment with its brigade was attached for a short time to 
the Eighteenth Corps, but the arrangement was only a temporary one. 



228 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
BREWSTER S BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE II. SHARPE ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 

(2) COL. CORNELIUS D. WESTBROOK. 



(3) COL. JOHN R. TAPPAN. 

(4) COL. ABRAM L. LOCKWOOD. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 



2 
I 



I 

4 
i 
i 




13 

12 

I I 

IO 

IS 

I I 

22 
12 
2O 
14 




14 
12 
I I 
12 

16 
1 1 

2 3 
16 

21 

J 5 


I 



I 







I 

4 



I 

21 

16 

i? 

M 
M 

21 
M 

J 3 
21 

27 


2 
21 

17 
17 
14 
14 
21 

14 

H 
21 

27 


I? 
148 

I 9 7 

156 
1 3 6 

J 59 
184 

148 
1 66 
164 

15* 


Company A 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


1 1 


140 


*S l 


3 


I 79 


182 


1,626 





Total of killed and wounded, 587 ; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 51. 
BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. K. &M.W. 



Chancellorsville, Va 13 

Gettysburg, Pa 54 

James City, Va 3 

Mine Run, Va 4 

Wilderness, Va 1 1 

Spotsylvania, Va 3 

North Anna, Va. . . i 

Totopotomoy, Va 3 



Cold Harbor, Va 2 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 25 

Strawberry Plains, Va i 

Poplar Spring Church, Va i 

Boydton Road, Va 13 

Hatcher s Run, Va. (March 25, 1865) 12 

White Oak Road, Va 4 

Picket Line, Va i 



Present, also, at Fredericksburg ; Wapping Heights ; Kelly s Ford ; Po River ; Deep Bottom ; Sailor s Creek ; 
Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. -- Recruited in Ulster and Greene counties (Tenth Senatorial District), and organized at Kingston, 
N. Y. It was mustered into service on August 22, 1862, with 900 men, and was ordered immediately to 
Washington, where it went into Camp near the Chain Bridge. It was attached, soon after, to the famous 
Excelsior Brigade, in which command it was under fire at Fredericksburg, where a few of the men were 
wounded. The regiment was actively engaged at Chancellorsville then in Berry s Division exhibiting a 
commendable steadiness and efficiency. Its loss in that battle was 4 killed, 49 wounded, and 13 missing. At 
Gettysburg in Humphreys s Division it became involved in the disaster of the second day s battle, but like 
the rest of the Third Corps, it fell back in good order to the second line, fighting as it went. Its casualties in 
this battle aggregated 30 killed, 154 wounded, and 19 missing; total, 203. Eight officers were killed and 9 
wounded in that battle. The Third Corps having been merged into the Second, the One Hundred and Twentieth 
was placed in Brewster s Brigade of Mott s Division, and from that time fought under the Second Corps flags, 
the men, however, retaining their old Third Corps badge. Mott s Division having been discontinued, the Excelsior 
Brigade was placed in Birney s (3d) Division, becoming the Fourth Brigade. General Mott succeeded eventu 
ally to the command of this division, and Colonel McAllister to that of the brigade. At the Wilderness the regiment 
lost 5 killed, 48 wounded, and 8 missing ; at the battle on the Boydton Road, 8 killed, 30 wounded, and 21 
missing; at Hatcher s Run, 6 killed, 32 wounded, and 46 missing. Mustered out June 3, 1865. 



TllKEK HUNDKKI) Fl<!HTlX< RKCJIMKNTS. 



229 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIRST NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
UPTON S BRIGADE WRKJHT S DIVISION-- SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. KICIIAKD FKANCIIOT ; HVT. BHIO.-OKN., U. S. V. (2) COL. KMOKY U1TON ; UVT. MAJOH-OKN., V. S. A. 

(8) COL. KCBEUT OLCOTT, B. . 



( OJII ANIK 


KII.I.KD AND DIED or Wot: N us. 


I)1EI> OK DlSEAHK, ArriDENTS, IN PltlNON, &<!. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Mm. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Kick! and Staff 



1 
I 
2 
I 



2 

2 

3 



2 




21 
21 

17 
2O 

18 

7 
20 

20 

2 5 
33 




22 
22 

9 

21 

18 
9 

22 

23 

25 

35 



-> 

I 



I 






T I 
12 

!3 

8 

12 

3 

J 5 
1 1 

I 2 
K) 




3 

12 

4 

8 

I 2 

14 

IS 

I I 

I 2 
10 


18 
189 
1 88 
196 
1 68 

97 
182 

197 
184 
1 88 
190 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F / 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


M 


212 


226 


4 


117 


121 


1,897 





1,426 enrolled during the war ; 226 killed 15.8 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 839; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), ig. 



BATTLES. K.&M.XV. 

Charlestown, W. V;i 2 

Opequon, Va 3 

Cedar Creek, Va 17 

Siege of Petersburg, Y;i i 

Hatcher s Run, Va. . . . i 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va i 

Sailor s Creek, Va 10 

Funkstown; Mine Run; Fort Stevens; Fisher s Hill; 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Salem Heights, Va 97 

Rappahannock Station, Va 6 

Wilderness, Va 20 

Spotsylvania, Va 60 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Skirmish, Va., May 7, 1863 i 

Petersburg, Va , June 23, 1864 i 

Present, also, at Crampton s Gap; Gettysburg 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Herkimer, N. Y., from companies raised in the Twentieth Senatorial District Otsego 
and Herkimer counties. It was mustered into service on August 23, 1862, and the next week started for the 
scene of active operations. It was immediately ordered to join General McClellan s Army, then in Maryland, 
and it did so in time to witness the fighting at Crampton s Gap. It was assigned to Bartlett s Brigade, Brooks s 
Division, Sixth Corps, in which command (Second Brigade, First Division, Sixth Army Corps) it served during 
its entire service. The regiment faced a terrible fire of musketry at Salem Church, Va., where it lost 48 killed, 
1 73 wounded, and 55 missing; total, 276, out of 453 officially reported as present. The missing ones were 
mostly all killed or wounded, and the loss was the heaviest sustained by any regiment in that battle. Colonel 
Upton was an officer of rare ability, and the regiment, which was composed of unusually good material, soon 
became, under Upton s care, a very efficient one. In the battle of Spotsylvania, May loth, Colonel Upton com 
manded, and led in person, an assaulting column of twelve picked regiments belonging to the Sixth Corps, the 
One Hundred and Twenty-first being placed in the advance, an honor which cost it dear. Its losses at Spotsyl 
vania amounted to 49 killed and 106 wounded; none missing. The regiment captured four flags at Rappahan 
nock Station, and two at Sailor s Creek. Its casualties at the Wilderness were 15 killed, 37 wounded, and 21 
missing; and at Cedar Creek, 10 killed, 42 wounded, and 5 missing. General Wright commanded the division 
at the Wilderness ; General Russell at the Opequon ; and General Wheaton at Cedar Creek. 



230 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INF. "ORANGE BLOSSOMS." 

WARD S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. A. V. H. ELLIS; BVT. BUIG.-GEN. (Killed). 



(2) COL. FRANCIS M. CUMMINS. 



(3) COL. CHARLES H. WEYGANT. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 



I 

* 


I 
I 
2 
I 
2 




II 

15 
I? 

9 
M 
14 
16 

M 

15 

12 


2 
12 

5 
18 

9 
14 
15 
i? 
16 

16 
14 




I 












8 

9 

8 

12 
II 

9 

10 

8 
8 

9 


9 

9 
8 

12 
II 

9 

IO 

8 
8 

9 


14 
122 

152 

118 
148 

121 
IOO 

"3 

I2Q 
I 3 2 

171 


Company A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


I I 


M7 


148 


I 


92 


93 


1,320 





K. & M.W 

Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864 3 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Boydton Road, Va 4 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 31, 1865 i 

Petersburg, Va., April i, 1 865 i 

Sailor s Creek, Va 6 

On Picket, Va., September 14, 1864 i 

On Picket, Va., September 15, 1864 i 



148 killed = ii. 2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 516 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 12. 

BATTLES. K. & M.W. BATTLES. 

Chancellorsville, Va 57 

Beverly Ford, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 35 

Wapping Heights, Va i 

Mine Run, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 8 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 8 

North Anna, Va 2 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

I 

Present, also, at Manassas Gap Fredericksburg ; Auburn ; Cold Harbor ; Strawberry Plains ; Deep Bottom ; 
Poplar Spring Church ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited in Orange county in August, 1862, and organized at Goshen, N. Y. It was mustered 
into service there, and five days later it crossed the Potomac, 930 strong. After two months service in Vir 
ginia, the regiment joined the Army of the Potomac at Harper s Ferry. It was placed in Whipple s Division, 
with which command it was under fire at Fredericksburg, and hotly engaged at Chancellorsville. In the latter engage 
ment it lost 28 killed, 161 wounded, and 15 missing ; a total of 204 out of 550 engaged. The regiment marched 
on the field of Gettysburg with 290 officers and men, of whom 28 were killed, 57 wounded, and 5 missing. 
Colonel Ellis and Major Cromwell were killed there, reeling lifeless from their saddles while cheering and encourag 
ing their men. The regiment has erected a costly monument at Gettysburg, which is surmounted by a life-size 
marble statute of their heroic colonel. In April, 1864, the Third Corps was ordered discontinued, after which 
the " Orange Blossoms " served in the ranks of the Second Corps, but the men still retained the old diamond- 
shaped badge on their caps, and the piece of orange ribbon on their coats. In July, 1864, Mott succeeded to 
the command ofBirney s Division (3d Division, 2d A. C.), and General DeTrobriand to the command of Ward s 
old Brigade. In Hancock s celebrated charge at Spotsylvania May i2th the regiment was in the front line, 
where its diminished ranks were again decimated, Colonel Cummins and Lieutenant-Colonel Weygant being 
wounded in the assault. Its losses at Spotsylvania were 7 killed, 46 wounded, and 8 missing; total, 61. 



THREK HUNDRED FIGHTING KEGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
FRANK S BRIGADE -BARIA>\V S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE I,. WILLAKI) B. . (Killed). 



(*) Ci.. LEVIN CKAXDELL. 



L. JOSEPH HVDE. 



COM PAN IBM. 


KlI.I.KI) AND DIED OF Wot NIJH. 


DlEI) OF Dl.HKAXE, ArrlDKXT*, Is I ICIMIN, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( Xfieers. 


Men. 


Total. 



8 

1 2 

9 

10 

9 
8 

1 1 

8 

3 
IS 

"3 


Field and StafT 


3 
I 



3 
i 

2 



3 

2 






12 
10 
10 

4 

7 

10 

16 
U 

10 
10 


3 

3 
10 

10 

I? 

8 

I 2 

16 
16 

I 2 

10 





I 













8 

1 1 

9 

U) 

1 9 

8 

1 1 
8 

3 
5 


16 
142 

"5 

I 22 
128 
I 29 

136 
122 
107 
121 
I 10 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


112 


127 


I 


I 12 


1,248 





127 killed 10.1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 464 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 58. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg Assault, Va 1 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Ream s Station, Vu 3 

White Oak Road, Va 6 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 4 

By Prison Guard i 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Harper s Ferry, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 38 

Bristoe Station, Va 4 

Wilderness, Va 9 

Po River, Va 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 16 

Spotsylvania, Va. (May 18) 4 

Totopotomoy, Va 

Present, also, at Mine Run ; Morton s Ford ; North Anna; Jerusalem Road ; Strawberry Plains ; Hat< lu T S 
Run ; Sailor s Creek , Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recniited and organized at Troy, N. Y. It was mustered into the United States service August 29, 
1862, and left the State immediately, en route for Harper s Ferry, where it was captured on September i5th, 
at the surrender of that post. The captured garrison was immediately paroled, the One Hundred and Twenty- 
fifth proceeding to Annapolis, from whence it was sent to a paroled camp at Chicago, 111., there to await notice of 
its exchange. After a two months stay at Chicago, the men were declared exchanged, upon which the regiment 
returned to Virginia. During the winter and spring of 1863 it was encamped at Centreville, Va., where it was 
attached to General Alex. Hays s Brigade. In June, 1863, that command joined the Army of the Potomac, and 
marched with it to Gettysburg, where Colonel Willard was killed while in command of the brigade, the regiment 
losing there 26 killed, 104 wounded, and 9 missing. At Gettysburg the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth was in 
Alex. Hays s (3d) Division, Second Corps; and it fought under Hays again at Bristoe Station, an action in which 
the regiment particularly distinguished itself by its dash and intrepid bearing in a critical situation. In 1864, it 
was transferred to Barlow s (ist) Division, and took a prominent part in the bloody fighting about Spotsylvania. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Myer fell mortally wounded at the battle of the Wilderness. The casualties in the regiment 
at the Wilderness were 6 killed, 17 wounded, and 5 missing ; at Po River and Spotsylvania, 10 killed, 74 wounded, 
and 6 missing ; at North Anna and Totopotomoy, 5 killed and 6 wounded. It commenced the final campaign of 
1865 w i tn 1 2 officers and 219 men "present for duty," although the names of 547 men were still carried on the rolls. 



232 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
WILLARD S BRIGADE ALEX. HAYS S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. ELIAKIM SHERRILL (Killed). 

(2) COL. JAMES M. BULL. 



(3) COL. WILLIAM II. BAIRD (Killed). 

(4) COL. IRA SMITH BROWN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


3 

I 

I 


* 

I 

2 
I 

4 
i 

2 


I 

IO 

25 
14 

20 

12 
U 
13 

9 
8 
1 1 


4 
1 1 

26 

14 
20 

13 

16 

M 
13 
9 
13 







I 


* 

12 
12 
II 

15 
14 
12 
II 
12 
II 
12 


* 

12 
I 2 
I I 

IS 
14 
12 

II 

13 
II 

12 


M 

106 

IOI 

107 
in 
103 
104 
96 

IO2 

94 
98 


f omnanv A . 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 




16 


137 


153 


I 


122 


123 


1,036 





153 killed = 14.7 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 535 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 25. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M. W. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M.W 



Cold Harbor, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 10 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 2 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 3 

Deep Bottom, Va 2 

Ream s Station, Va 3 

Picket, Va., Oct. 20, 1864 i 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 2 

Sutherland Station, Va i 



Maryland Heights, Md 17 

Gettysburg, Pa 64 

Auburn Ford, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 ) 5 

Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 j 7 

Morton s Ford, Va 3 

Wilderness, Va 18 

Po River, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 6 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Present, also, at Mine Run ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Boydton Road ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited at Geneva, N. Y., from the counties of Ontario, Seneca, and Yates. It was under fire 
for the first time at Maryland Heights, where it received the main force of the enemy s attack, a large share of 
the casualties occurring in its ranks. During the fighting at Harper s Ferry it lost 13 killed and 42 wounded; 
total, 55. The regiment was surrendered two days after, together with the rest of the garrison at Harper s 
Ferry, and being paroled immediately was ordered to Chicago, 111., where it spent two months in Camp Parole, 
awaiting notice of its exchange. Returning to Virginia, the winter of 1862-3 was passed in camp at Union 
Mills, Va. In June, 1863, it joined the Army of the Potomac, and was placed in Willard s Brigade, Alex. 
Hays s (3d) Division, Second Corps, with which it marched to Gettysburg, where the regiment won honorable 
distinction, capturing five stands of colors in that battle. Colonel Willard, the brigade commander, being killed 
there, Colonel Sherrill succeeded him, only to meet the same fate, while in the regiment the casualties amounted 
to 40 killed, 181 wounded, and 10 missing; total, 231. At Bristoe Station the regiment won additional honors 
by its conspicuous gallantry, and sustained the heaviest loss in that action ; casualties, 6 killed, 33 wounded, and 
10 missing; total, 49. The One Hundred and Twenty-sixth having been transferred to Barlow s (ist) Division, 
entered the spring campaign of 1864 with less than 300 men, of whom 100 were detailed at headquarters as a 
provost-guard. Its casualties at the Wilderness were 5 killed, 62 wounded, and 9 missing ; and at Po River 
and Spotsylvania, 6 killed, 37 wounded, and 7 missing. Colonel Baird was killed at Petersburg. 



TiutKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



288 



ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
GREENE S BRIGADE GEARY S DIVISION TWELFTH CORPS. 



(I)COL. DAVID IRELAND, B. *. (Died). 



KOKKT VAN vooinn<. 



COMPANIKM. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUND*. 


DIED or DIHKANK, ACOIDKNTH, IN I KIMON, tc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


( >ftVt>rs. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




2 

I 



i 



i 
i 






12 
I I 

14 
I I 
I I 

T 3 
S 

10 

1 1 

12 

I 




M 
12 

M 
I I 
12 

T 3 

16 

10 
12 
12 

I 


2 










2 


I 

1 5 

I 2 

3 
1 6 

M 
16 

22 

17 
12 

3 
I 2 


3 

5 

I 2 
!3 

1 6 

4 
16 

22 

7 
I 2 

5 

I 2 


M 

"3 

128 

I0 5 
103 

I IO 
121 
109 
I0 4 
IO2 
IO2 

* 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Unassigned Co. (1865). . 
Totals 


6 


121 


I2 7 


4 


I6 3 


I6 7 


1,1 I I 





127 killed =- 11.4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 490 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 7. 

BATTLKS. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Chancellorsville, Va 5 

Gettysburg, Pa 52 

Wauhatchie, Term 31 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn 10 

Ringgold, Ga i 

Resaca, Ga i 



K.&M.W. 

Pine Knob, Ga 10 

Nose s Creek, Ga i 

Kencsaw Mountain, Ga i 

Peach Tree Creek, Ga 12 

Atlanta. Ga i 

Siege of Savannah, Ga 2 



Present, also, at Missionary Ridge ; Rocky Face Ridge ; Cassville ; Lost Mountain ; Sherman s March ; The 
Carolinas ; Averasboro. 

NOTES. Organized at Binghamton, N. Y., from companies raised in the Twenty-fourth Senatorial District, 
Broome, Tompkins, and Tioga counties. Recruiting commenced August 15, 1862, the full regiment being 
mustered into service on the 25th of the following month. Leaving Binghamton, two days later, 1,008 strong, 
it went to Harper s Ferry, arriving there on September 30, 1862. While there it was assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Second Division (Geary s), Twelfth Corps the "White Star" Division in which it remained 
permanently. This regiment won special honors at Gettysburg, then in Greene s Brigade, which, alone and unas 
sisted, held Gulp s Hill during a critical period of that battle against a desperate attack of vastly superior force. 
The casualties in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh at Gettysburg exceeded those of any other regiment in 
the Corps, amounting to 40 killed, 87 wounded, and 10 missing. The gallant defense of Culp s Hill by Greene s 
Brigade, and the terrible execution inflicted by its musketry on the assaulting column of the enemy form one of 
the most noteworthy incidents of the war. The Twelfth Corps left Virginia in September, 1863, and went to 
Tennessee, joining Grant s Army at Chattanooga. In the month following their arrival the regiment was engaged 
in the midnight battle at Wauhatchie, Tenn., where it lost 15 killed and 75 wounded; and, a few weeks later, 
fought with Hooker at Lookout Mountain in the famous " battle above the clouds ;" casualties in that 
battle, 6 killed and 32 wounded. In April, 1864, the corps number was changed to the Twentieth, General 
Hooker being placed in command. A large accession was received from the Eleventh Corps, but Colonel Ireland 
and General Geary retained their respective commands. The One Hundred and Thirty-seventh shared in all 
the marches and battles of the Atlanta campaign, and then marched with Sherman to the Sea. 



234 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
WEED S BRIGADE AYRES S DIVISION FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. PATRICK H. O RORKE, OT. $., &. a. (Killed). 

(2) COL. GEORGE RYAN, WM.. tf., B. a. (Killed). 



(3) COL. ELWELL S. OTIS, BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 

(4) COL. WILLIAM S. GRUNTSYNN. 



COMPANIES 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


3 
i 

i 

i 

i 
i 


2 
2O 
I I 

J 5 
1 1 

20 
IO 

J 3 
J 9 

J 3 

7 


5 

21 
II 

16 
ii 

20 
IO 

*3 

20 
14 

8 







I 

I 







2O 

J 3 
i7 

21 

16 
14 

9 
16 

21 
21 




2O 

13 

17 

22 

16 

1 5 

9 
16 

21 

21 


J 5 

i?3 

148 

187 
162 
171 
167 
172 
1 80 
176 
156 




B . 


r . 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G. 




T . 


K. 


Totals. 


8 


141 


149 


2 


168 


170 


1,707 





Total of killed and wounded, 533 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 77. 



BATTLES. K. &M. W. 

Chancellorsville, Va 4 

Gettysburg, Pa 41 

Wilderness, Va 55 

Spotsylvania, Va 17 

Bethesda Church, Va 3 

Picket Line, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Weldon Railroad, Va 7 

Poplar Spring Church. Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va 5 

White Oak Road, Va 3 

Five Forks, Va 6 



Present, also, at Fredericksburg ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run North Anna ; Totopotomoy ; White 
Oak Swamp (1864) ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Rochester, N. Y., and mustered into service September 13, 1862, leaving the State on 
September 20. The regiment joined the Army of the Potomac in November, and was assigned to Warren s (3d) 
Brigade, Sykes s (2d) Division, Fifth Corps. It was present with this command at Fredericksburg. where it was 
under fire for the first time, a few of the men being wounded there. Colonel O Rorke was killed at 
Gettysburg while leading his men into action on Little Round Top, where their prompt action aided largely 
in seizing that important position, the regiment losing there 26 killed, 89 wounded, and 18 missing; total 133. 
The One Hundred and Fortieth was then in Ayres s Division the division of regulars. In 1864 the regulars 
were brigaded in one command under Ayres, and the One Hundred and Fortieth was placed in the same brigade ; 
the division was commanded by General Charles Griffin. But in June, 1864, the regiment was transferred to the 
First Brigade of Ayres s (2d) Division. This brigade was commanded in turn by Colonel Gregory, General 
Joseph Hayes, Colonel Otis, and General Winthrop. The latter officer fell mortally wounded at Five Forks. 
The regiment was in the hottest of the fighting at the Wilderness, and suffered severely there, losing 23 killed, 1 18 
wounded, and 114 captured or missing; total, 255. Three days later on May 8th it was engaged in the 
first of the series of battles at Spotsylvania, in which action Colonel Ryan and Major Milo L. Starks were killed. 
At Spotsylvania the casualties in the regiment were 1 2 killed and 48 wounded ; and at the Weldon Railroad, 4 
killed, 19 wounded, and 51 captured or missing. The regiment was composed of exceptionally good material ; 
the men were a neat, clean lot, and in their handsome Zouave costume attracted favorable attention wherever 
they appeared. 



TlIltKK HUNDKKD FlHHTIXd liKGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED .AND FORTY-SECOND NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
CURTIS S BRIGADE -- TURNER S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. ROSCIUS W. JUDSON ; BVT. BRIG.-GBN. (2) COL. NEWTON M. CURTIS ; BVT. MAJOR-QKN. 

(3) COL. ALI1KKT M. BARNEY; BVT. BKHI-OEN. 



( OH PA MRS 


KILLED ANI DIEM or WOITSD*. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IUHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers, 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 





2 

I 









3 


I I 

16 

14 
IO 

12 
IO 

3 
1 1 

4 
15 

126 




I I 
18 

15 

10 
I 2 
10 

13 

I I 

14 

J 5 









I 



I 







7 
16 
16 

14 
M 
1 8 

M 
J 7 

i? 

18 




7 
16 
16 
14 
14 
19 
14 
18 

17 
18 


M 
IS* 

153 
123 

118 

35 
140 

33 
136 

32 
134 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


T 


K 


Totals 


129 


2 


161 


163 


*,37 





Total of killed and wounded, 502 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 10. 
BATTLES. K. & M.W. BATTLES. 



K.&M.NV. 



John s Island, S. C i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 22 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 20 

Cold Harbor, Va v 5 

Petersburg Mine, Va 4 



Siege of Petersburg, Va 16 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 1 6 

Darbytown Road, Va., October 27, 1864 22 

Fort Fisher, N. C 21 

Place unknown 2 



Present, also, at Siege of Suffolk ; Petersburg Assault ; Fort Anderson ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Organized at Ogdensburgh from companies recruited in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, and 
was mustered in September 29, 1862. Proceeding immediately to Washington, it remained on duty there until 
April 19, 1863, when it moved to Suffolk, Va. It participated in the campaign of Gordon s Division, up the 
Peninsula in June, and in the Maryland march, soon after Gettysburg. From Warrenton, Va., the regiment went 
to Morris Island, S. C., arriving there August 17, 1863. In the following May, the One Hundred and Forty- 
second returned to Virginia, and joined Butler s Army of the James, having been assigned to the First Brigade, 
Second Division (Turner s), Tenth Corps. While at Cold Harbor the division was attached for a short time to 
the Eighteenth Corps. The losses in the regiment at Drewry s Bluff and Bermuda Hundred -- May 16-20, 1864 
were 19 killed, 78 wounded, and 22 missing; at Chaffin s Farm, 6 killed, 51 wounded, and 10 missing; and 
at Darbytown Road, 8 killed, 90 wounded, and 5 missing. In December, 1864, the Tenth Corps was merged in 
the newly-formed Twenty-fourth Corps, the regiment being placed in Curtis s (ist) Brigade, Ames s (2(1) 
Division. In the same month this division, including the One Hundred and Forty-second, sailed with Butler on 
the first expedition against Fort Fisher, N. C. It landed there, and when the brigade was recalled from its 
advance the regiment had secured a position near to and in rear of the fort, so near that Lieutenant Walling had 
captured a battle flag which had been shot down from the parapets. A battalion of the enemy were captured by 
the One Hundred and Seventeenth New York, and the whole opposition of the Confederates was so weak that 
the officers believed that the fort could have been taken then with small loss. The statements of General 
Curtis and other officers were so positive on this point, that General Grant was largely influenced by them in 
his decision to order a second attempt. In this second affair, which was successful, General Curtis led the assault 
and fell seriously wounded, but survived to enjoy his honors as the " Hero of Fort Fisher." 



236 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
AYRES S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. KENNER GARRARD, 



1. P., B. a.; BVT. MAJOR-GEN., U. S. A. (2) COL. DAVID T. JENKINS (Killed). 

(3) COL. JAMES GRINDLAY ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN., U. S. V. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

* 

2 




I 



I 
I 




* 

*5 

12 
IO 
I I 

13 

21 

7 
i? 

IO 
10 


2 

15 

14 

10 

ii 

14 

21 

8 
18 

IO 
10 



* 




I 

I 






14 

23 
14 

22 

25 

22 

13 

13 

22 

I I 




M 

23 
14 

22 
26 
22 

J 3 
13 

2 3 
I I 


18 

i74 
181 
172 

J 73 
170 

1 80 

iS 1 

T 5 2 
170 

166 




B 


c. 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


7 


126 


J 33 


2 


I 79 


181 


1,707 





Total of killed and wounded, 482 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 81. 
BATTLES. K. & M. W. BATTLES. 
I 



K.&M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 7 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 8 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 

Weldon Railroad, Va 6 

White Oak Road, Va 13 

Five Forks, Va 5 



Fredericksburg, Va 

Chancellorsville, Va 5 

Gettysburg, Pa 7 

Williamsport, Md i 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 65 

Spotsylvania, Va 7 

North Anna, Va 2 

Present, also, at Rappahannock Station; Bristoe Station; White Oak Swamp (1864); Hatcher s Run; 
Chapel House ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. --Recruited in Oneida county, and organized at Rome, N. Y. It was mustered into the service of 
the United States on October 10, 1862, and proceeded immediately to Washington. In November, 1862, it 
joined the Army of the Potomac at Snicker s Gap, Va., where it was assigned to Warren s Brigade, Sykes s 
Division, Fifth Corps, a division composed mostly of regulars. It marched with them to Fredericksburg, where 
it participated in its first battle. When the Durye"e Zouaves were mustered out, in May, 1863, the recruits of 
that famous regiment were transferred to the One Hundred and Forty-sixth ; they numbered 283 men, and were 
a valuable accession. In 1864, a similar transfer was made from the Forty- fourth New York when this regiment 
went home. The regiment encountered its severest fighting at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, where 
it suffered a terrible loss, not only in killed and wounded, but in captured men, nearly 200 having been taken 
prisoners. Colonel Jenkins and Major Henry H. Curran were killed in that bloody encounter, while the total loss 
of the regiment was 20 killed, 67 wounded, and 225 captured or missing. In 1865, the regiment was in Winthrop s 
(ist) Brigade, Ayres s (2d) Division, and was prominently engaged in that command at the battles of White 
Oak Road, and Five Forks, General Winthrop being killed in the latter engagement while leading a successful 
charge of the brigade. The One Hundred and Forty-sixth was well drilled, and at one time wore a conspicuous 
Zouave uniform. General Joseph Hayes, its last brigade commander, in taking leave of the regiment wrote, 
that " associated for a long time with the infantry of the Regular Army, the One Hundred and Forty-sixth yields 
the palm to none." The war having ended, the regiment was mustered out of service July 16, 1865. 



THUKK HUNDRED FIGHTING RI.<.IMI:NTS. 



237 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
CUTLKK S BRIGADE WADSWORTH S DIVISION - - FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. ANDREW S. WARM I ; 



(2) Cou JOHN (J. BUTLER. 



(8)Coi.. FRANCIS C. MILLER. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DlKD OF PlSKASK, ACCIDENTS, IN PlIIHON, Ac. 


Total 

Kim ill incut. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 







2 
2 

2 


* 

2 

I 




19 
17 
2O 

II 
12 
12 

2 5 

7 
9 

22 




19 

J 7 
20 

13 

M 
M 

2 5 

7 
1 1 

2 3 







I 



I 







M 
18 

20 

19 
2O 

26 
10 
26 

1 1 

I I 




4 

18 

20 

20 
2O 
2 7 
10 

26 

1 1 
I I 


5 

2 I I 

215 
21 2 

2O I 
207 
203 
212 
2OO 
214 
212 




B 


c 


I) 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals 


9 


J 54 


,63 


2 


175 


177 


2,102 





Total of killed and wounded, 581 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 62. 
BATTLES. K. & M.W. BATTLES. 



K.&M.W. 



Cold Harbor, Va i 

Petersburg Assault, Va., June 16-1 7, 1864 15 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Weldon Railroad, Va 

Hatcher s Run, Va 6 

White Oak Road, Va 

Five Forks, Va 4 

Picket Line i 



Fitz Hugh s Crossing, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 76 

Haymarket, Va i 

M ine Run, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 28 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 1 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 2 

Present, also, at Chancellorsville ; Totopotomoy ; Boydton Road ; Hicksford ; Chapel House ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The One Hundred and Forty-seventh was organized in the city of Oswego, N. V., from companies 
recruited in Oswego county, and was mustered into service on September 23, 1862. Its first casualties in battle 
occurred May 29, 1863, in the affair at Fitz Hugh s Crossing below Fredericksburg, one of the preliminary 
movements of the Chancellorsville campaign. The regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Miller, 
then marched to Gettysburg. The brigade Cutler s was the first infantry to arrive on that field, and to it 
fell the honor of opening that famous battle, the first volley coming from the rifles of the Fifty-sixth Pennsylva 
nia.* When Cutler s troops were forced back, the order to retire failed to reach the One Hundred and Forty- 
seventh, as Colonel Miller fell wounded and senseless just as he received it, and so the gallant band, under 
Major Harney, continued to hold their ground. A temporary success near by enabled them to retire in good 
order; but not all of them, for of the 380 who entered that fight, 76 were killed or mortally wounded, 146 were 
wounded, and 79 were missing; total, 3Oi.| 

During Grant s bloody campaign of 1864-5, tne regiment fought in Warren s Fifth Corps, being actively- 
engaged in all its battles. In December, 1864, the remnant of the Seventy-sixth New York infantry was trans 
ferred to the One Hundred and Forty-seventh New York. 

This honor is also claimed by the Fourteenth Brooklyn, of the same brigade ; but, after list -ning attentively to an exhaustive argument, 
made on the ground, and in whieh both parties were ably represented by surviving itartici pants, thu evidence appeared to favor the Fifty-sixth 
Pennsylvania. 

t From inscription on monument at Gettysburg. 



238 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDEED AND FORTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
GREENE S BRIGADE GEARY S DIVISION TWELFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY A. BARNUM ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



(2) COL. NICHOLAS GRUMBACH. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIKD OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIUSON, <fec. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 


* 






I 
2 


1 1 

17 

5 
IO 

I I 

15 
IO 

13 

12 
15 


I 
1 1 

T 7 
J 5 

10 

1 1 

15 

10 

13 
13 
17 





* 
* 










8 

9 

8 

9 

7 
6 
8 
8 

IO 

5 


* 

8 

9 

8 

9 

7 
6 
8 
8 

IO 

5 


14 
112 

128 
122 

J 34 

*35 
92 

101 

136 

87 

94 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


4 


I2 9 


133 





78 


78 


i^SS 





BATTLES. 



133 killed = 11.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 486. 
K.&M.W. BATTLES. 



Chancellorsville, Va 38 

Gettysburg, Pa 12 

VVauhatchie, Term 3 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn 12 

Ringgold, Ga 6 

Resaca, Ga 3 

New Hope Church, Ga 12 



K.&M.W. 

Lost Mountain, Ga 3 

Pine Knob, Ga 7 

Kenesaw Mountain, G.a 7 

Peach Tree Creek, Ga 23 

Atlanta, Ga 3 

Siege of Savannah, Ga 3 

Place unknown i 



Present, also, at Missionary Ridge ; Rocky Face Ridge ; Averasboro ; Bentonville ; The Carolinas. 

NOTES. - - The companies composing this regiment were recruited in Onondaga county, and organized at 
Syracuse, N. Y. It was mustered in on September 18, 1862, the Colonelcy having been accepted by General 
Barnum, who had already served with distinction as Major of the Twelfth New York. The regiment left Syra 
cuse on September 23, 1862, and within a short time joined General McClellan s army. It was assigned to the 
Third Brigade, Geary s Division, Twelfth Corps, in which command it fought at Chancellorsville, losing there 15 
killed, 68 wounded, and 103 captured or missing. At Gettysburg the regiment participated in the famous 
defense of Gulp s Hill, made by Greene s Brigade, in which the One Hundred and Forty-ninth, fighting behind 
breastworks, lost 6 killed, 46 wounded, and 3 missing, but inflicted many times that loss on its assailants. With 
the Twelfth Corps, it was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, and the Onondaga boys fought as bravely 
in Tennessee as in Virginia or at Gettysburg. At Lookout Mountain, Tenn., they captured five flags while 
fighting under Hooker in that memorable affair, their casualties amounting to 10 killed and 64 wounded. Before 
starting on the Atlanta campaign the Twelfth Corps was designated the Twentieth, its command being given 
to General Hooker. The regiment started on that campaign with 380 fighting men, of whom 136 were killed or 
wounded before reaching Atlanta. Lieutenant-Colonel Charles B. Randall, a gallant and skilful officer, was killed 
at Peach Tree Creek, in which action the regiment sustained its heaviest loss while on that campaign, its casual 
ties there aggregating 17 killed, 25 wounded, and 10 missing. The regiment after marching with Sherman to 
the Sea was actively engaged in the Siege of Savannah, and then marched through the Carolinas on the final 
campaign which ended in the surrender of Johnson. 



THKEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



239 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FOURTH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
MURPHY S BRIGADE-- GIBBON S DIVISION -- SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN E. McMAHON (Died). 



(2) COL. .JAMKS I . McMAHON (Killed). 



(8) COL. WILLIAM I)K I.ACKY ; BVT. BRIO.-GBN. 



ClIMPANIBH. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I KIMON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 

3 
84 

86 

94 

82 

9 

87 
96 

101 

99 

95 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( )fflcers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Stall 


I 
2 
2 



I 




3 

i 





i 

10 

3 

10 

-4 
10 

3 
ii 

6 
3 
15 


2 
I 2 

5 

IO 

5 

IO 
!3 

14 

7 

3 

5 


2 



* 


I 








I 

IO 

9 

IO 
IO 

16 
1 1 

I 2 
20 

7 
20 


3 

10 

9 

10 
10 

17 

I 1 

12 
20 

7 
20 




B 


c . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


106 


116 


3 


126 


1 29 


928 





116 killed 12.5 per cent. 
Total of killed ami wounded, 437 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 69. 



K.AM.W 

i 



BATTLES. 

Deserted House, Va 

Suffolk, Va ............................... 2 

Edenton Road, Va ......................... i 

Franklin, Va .............................. i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 .............. 24 

Cold Harbor, Va .......................... 56 



K.AM.W. 



BATTLES. 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 14 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 7 

Ream s Station, Va 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va i 

Salisbury Prison, N. C i 

Present, also, at North Anna ; Totopotomoy ; Deep Bottom ; Strawberry Plains ; Hatcher s Run ; Farmville ; 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. One of the four regiments forming the Corcoran Legion, a brigade composed, mostly, of Irish 
soldiers. The One Hundred and Sixty-fourth was recruited in New York, Brooklyn, Buffalo, ami in the counties 
of Niagara and St. Lawrence. It was organized in New York City, and mustered into service on November 19, 
1 862. The Legion was ordered to the Peninsula soon after, where it was placed in the Seventh Corps. On the 29th 
of January, 1863, the brigade started on the Blackwater Expedition (General Corcoran commanding the Division), 
during which it saw its first fighting, at the affair known as the Deserted House. The gallant behavior of the 
Legion in this engagement elicited a General Order from Department Headquarters which was highly compli 
mentary to the command. In April, 1863, it was actively engaged in the Siege of Suffolk. General Corcoran 
commanded the Legion up to the time of his death, which occurred at Fairfax, Va., December 22, 1863. From 
July, 1863, until May, 1864, the Legion was stationed near Washington, after which it joined Grant s army at 
Spotsylvania, where it was assigned to Gibbon s (2(1) Division, Second Corps. At Cold Harbor it was in the 
assaulting column, and succeeded in carrying the portion oi the enemy s works in its immediate front, but with a 
heavy loss in men and officers. Seven officers of the regiment were killed in that assault, including Colonel 
McMahon, who was shot down after having with his own hands planted the regimental colors on the Confederate 
works ; the regiment, however, was obliged to fall back, owing to the failure at other points of the line, having 
lost 16 killed, 59 wounded, and 82 missing. The Legion was commanded at Spotsylvania by Colonel Murphy 
(i82d N. Y.), who afterwards fell mortally wounded at Dabney s Mills. The casualties in the regiment at 
Spotsylvania were 12 killed, 66 wounded, and 14 missing; total, 92. Mustered out July 15, 1865. 



24:0 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-NINTH NEW YORK INFANTRY 
DRAKE S BRIGADE AMES S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. CLARENCE BUELL. (2) Coi,. JOHN McCONIIIE ; BVT. BRIO. -GEN. (Killed). (3) COL. ALONZO ALDEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON. &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

2 

* 

I 

2 

I 
I 



I 



I 


I 

13 

14 

J 5 
M 
20 

20 

12 
I I 
12 

5 


2 

IS 

H 

16 
16 

21 
21 
1 2 
I 2 
I 2 

16 







I 
I 


* 



I 


I 
2O 

6 

12 
10 

16 
18 
1 1 

13 

8 

TO 


I 
2O 
6 

12 
11 

17 

l8 

II 
13 

8 
ii 


18 

147 
I3 1 

J 54 
161 
162 
148 

122 

127 

156 

141 




B . 


C . 


D 


K 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


M7 


157 


3 


I 2 5 


i ,8 


1,467* 





157 killed = 10.7 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 618 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 23. 



BATTLES. K.&M. W. 

Suffolk, Va 2 

Fort Wagner, S. C 4 

Chester Station, Va. ) 14 

Walthall Junction, Va. J 12 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 2 

Cold Harbor.. Va . , 19 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Petersburg, Va., June 30, 1864 26 

Petersburg Mine, Va 7 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 1 8 

Dutch Gap, Va., August 13, 1864 8 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 6 

Fort Fisher, N. C J39 

Present, also, at Edenton Road ; Carrsville ; Blackwater ; Zuni; Nansemond ; South Anna; Drewry s Bluff; 
Darbytown Road ; Wilmington. 

NOTES. Organized at Troy, N. Y., and mustered in by companies during September and October, 1862, 
the men coming from Rensselaer and Washington counties. The regiment was actively engaged in the 
defence of Suffolk, Va., April, 1863, where it served in Foster s Brigade. Corcoran s Division. In the following 
summer it participated in the operations about Charleston Harbor, and in May, 1864, it moved with the Army 
of the James to Bermuda Hundred. The regiment disembarked there with Butler s Army, and hard fighting, 
with its consequent heavy losses, immediately ensued. At Cold Harbor it fought in Martindale s Division ; Col 
onel McConihe was killed in that battle. The One Hundred and Sixty-ninth held a perilous position in the 
trenches before Petersburg, losing men there, killed or wounded, almost every day. While there, on the evening of 
June 30, 1864, the brigade (Barton s) was ordered to charge the enemy s lines, so that, under cover of their fire, 
Curtis s Brigade could throw up an advanced rifle-pit ; but the regiment while going into position was prema 
turely discovered by the enemy, and thereby drew upon themselves a severe fire, which not only frustrated the 
plan, but cost the regiment many lives. The regiment was one of those selected for the expedition against Fort 
Fisher; it was then in Bell s (3d) Brigade, Ames s Division, Tenth Corps, and took part in the desperate but 
victorious assault on that stronghold. A large proportion of its losses there, however, occurred at the explosion 
of the magazine, after the fort had been captured. After the fall of Fort Fisher, the regiment accompanied the 
Tenth Corps in its advance on Wilmington. It was mustered out July 19, 1865. 



* Does not include men transferred from the One Hundred and Forty-second New York, after the war had ended. 
t Including those killed by the explosion of the magazine, the day after thp fort was captured 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



241 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTIETH NEW YORK INFANTRY. 
MURPHY S BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. PETER McDERMOTT. 



(2) Coi.. JAMKS 1 . MclVOK; HVT. MAJOR-OEX. 



OiMTAMKS. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DIME AXE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKIMON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Offloen. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff 


I 



I 
I 
I 
I 

2 
I 
I 



I 




13 
l? 

8 

5 

3 

6 

7 

12 

J 3 
iS 


I 

!3 
18 

9 
16 

14 
8 

8 

J 3 

T 3 
16 


i 




* 



I 






IO 

9 
8 

IO 

ii 

12 

8 

9 
9 

10 




10 
10 

8 

IO 

1 1 

12 

8 
9 

IO 
10 


5 
107 

127 

93 
92 

96 
89 

100 

96 

87 

IOO 




B . 


c . 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


IO 


119 


129 


2 


96 


98 


I,OO2 





129 killed 12.8 per cent. 

Total of killed and wounded, 481 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 48. 
BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. 



Suffolk, Va 2 

Cajrsville, Va i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 12 

North Anna, Va 43 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va., June 16-18, 1864 36 



K.AM.W. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 1 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 6 

Deep Bottom, Va 3 

Ream s Station, Va 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va 2 

Present, also, at Deserted House; Suffolk; Edenton Road; Totopotomoy; Strawbeny Plains ; Vaughn 
Road ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. When General Corcoran returned from his year of imprisonment in Richmond, he raised the 
brigade of Irish regiments known as the Corcoran Legion, composed of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth, One 
Hundred and Sixty-fourth, One Hundred and Seventieth, and One Hundred and Eighty-second (Sixty-ninth 
N. Y. S. M.) New York regiments. The One Hundred and Seventieth was recruited in New York and Brooklyn, 
and was mustered in at Staten Island on October 7, 1862. It embarked for Fort Monroe in November, and 
after a few weeks service on the Peninsula went to Suffolk. It was actively engaged in the defence of Suffolk, 
at which time the Legion was commanded by Colonel Murphy, of the Sixty-ninth N. Y. S. M., and the division 
by General Corcoran the First Division, Seventh Corps. It remained on duty in that vicinity until July, 1863, 
when the Legion (General Corcoran commanding) was ordered to Washington, where it performed garrison and 
outpost duty. In May, 1864, it was transferred to the Army of the Potomac, and placed in Gibbon s ((!) 
Division of the Second Corps, the Legion, under command of Colonel Murphy, arriving just in time to take part 
in the closing battles around Spotsylvania. At the North Anna the One Hundred and Seventieth encountered a 
severe musketry fire, its casualty list there being the largest of any regiment in that battle : loss, 22 killed, 55 
wounded, and 22 missing; total, 99. It met with another heavy loss at Petersburg, June 16-22, 1864, where 
its casualties amounted to 22 killed, 1 1 1 wounded, and 3 missing ; total, 136. Most of this loss occurred in the 
assault of June 16. The regiment was again hotly engaged at Ream s Station, where Major Donnelly was killed. 
From June, 1864, until the close of the war, the Legion, together with the Eighth New York Heavy Artillery, 
formed the Second Brigade of the Second Division, Second Corps. 
16 



242 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIRST NEW JERSEY CAVALRY. 
DAVIES S BRIGADE D. M. GREGG S DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS, A. P. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM HALSTED. (2) COL. PERCY WYNDHAM. (3) COL. JOHN W. KESTER. 

(4) COL. HUGH J. JANEWAY (Killed). (5) COL. MYRON H. BEAUMONT. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 





I 

I 

2 
I 

3 




15 

12 

5 
9 
14 

5 
8 

10 
ii 
10 

9 
8 


4 

!5 
12 

5 
9 
M 
6 

9 

JO 

!3 
IO 

IO 

1 1 


2 



I 




* 

I 

* 



* 




18 
16 
8 
4 

I 2 
*7 

18 

14 

16 

21 

1 7 
14 


2 

18 

i? 

8 

M 

1 2 

J 7 
*9 
M 
16 

21 

!7 
14 


2 3 
270 

257 
246 
211 
226 

186 
229 
229 
242 
248 
246 

2 33 




B 


C . 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K , 


L 


M 


Totals . 


I 2 


116 


128 


4 


85 


189 


2,846 





Total of killed and wounded, 457 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 35. 



BATTLES. K, & M.W 

Picket, Va., Feb. 25, 1862 i 

Rappahannock, Va., May 14, 1862 i 

Strasburg, Va., June i, 1862. i 

Woodstock, Va., June 2, 1862 .... i 

Harrisonburg, Va., June 6, 1862. . . 3 

Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862 2 

Brandy Station, Va., Aug. 20, 1862. I 

Rappahannock, Va., Aug. 21, 1862. i 

Aldie, Va., Oct. 31, 1862 i 

Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863 4 

Aldie, Va., June 22, 1.863 I 

Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 8 

Mountain Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863. 10 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Guerrillas, Va., Dec. 17, 1863 i 

Warrenton, Va., Jan. 15. 1864 I 

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 5, 1864. . 21 

Beaver Dam, Va., May 9, 1864 ... i 

Richmond Raid, Va., May , 1864 2 

Hanovertown, Va., May 26, 1864. . i 

Hawes s Shop, Va., May 28, 1864. . 21 

Trevilian Station, June n, 1864. . 2 

Petersburg, Va., July , 1864. ... 2 

Shenandoah, Va., July ,1864.... i 

Malvern Hill, Va., July 28, 1864. . . 7 

Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, 1864. . 2 

Vaughn Road, Va., Oct. i, 1864... 4 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Bellefield Station, Va., Dec. 10, 1864 4 

Hatcher s Run, Va.. Feb. 6, 1865.. 3 

Picket, Va., March 4, 1865 , I 

Dinwiddie C. H., March 30, 1865. . 2 

Chamberlain s Creek, March 31, 65 i 

Burke s Station, Va., April 4 1865. 2 

Amelia Springs, Va., April 5, 1865. 3 

Sailor s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. 2 

Farmville, Va., April 7,1865 2 

Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865. ... I 

Andersonville Prison i 

Place unknown. 5 



NOTES. Of the 272 cavalry regiments in the Union Army, the First New Jersey stands sixth in point of losses 
in action. It was organized at Trenton, N. J., August 14, 1861, and arrived at Washington the same month, where 
it remained encamped during the succeeding fall and winter. In February, Colonel Halsted resigned, and was 
succeeded by Percy Wyndham, an officer of the Italian army who had seen some service in Europe. The regi 
ment took the field early in 1862, entering upon a series of arduous and perilous campaigns which ended only 
with the war. In addition to the actions above mentioned, the regiment was engaged in a large number of affairs 
in which it lost men wounded or captured. In 1862 it served in General Bayard s cavalry brigade; at Gettys 
burg, it was in Macintosh s (ist) Brigade, Gregg s (ad) Division, Cavalry Corps; in 1864 Davies commanded 
this brigade, in which the regiment remained without further change. Colonel Janeway fell at Amelia Springs ; 
Lieutenant-Colonel Virgil Broderick and Major John H. Shelmire were killed at Brandy Station ; Major James 
H. Hart was killed at Dinwiddie C. H., March 31, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



24H 



FIRST NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
FIRST JERSEY BRIGADE WRIGHT S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL WILLIAM R MONTGOMERY : CT. 13., BRIO. OKI*. U. 8. V. 

9) COL. ALFRED T. TOKBEKT : IB. $., B. 4.. BVT. MAJOR-GEN. U. 8. A. 



(3) COL. MAHK W. COL LETT (Killed). 

(4) COL. WILLIAM 1IKNUY. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DINEAPE, ACCIDENT*, IN PRIHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 




2 




I 
2 
I 



I 




II 
12 

23 

16 

23 

*3 

8 

12 

8 
18 


2 
1 1 
12 

2 5 
16 

23 
14 

10 

3 

8 

9 








* 

I 








5 
5 
7 
14 
1 1 

5 

10 

8 

7 
18 




5 
5 
7 
M 
1 1 

5 
1 1 

8 

7 
18 


7 
I 2O 

I2 5 
142 

I2 5 
126 

I IO 

114 

127 
114 

204 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


144 


^53 


I 


90 


9 1 


1,324 





153 killed 11.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 546; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), ig. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Picket, Va., Oct. 15, 1861 i 

Games Mill, Va 44 

Manassas, Va 1 1 

Crampton s Pass, Md 9 

Salem Heights, Va 19 

Wilderness, Va 37 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 

Cold Harbor, Va 8 

Snicker s Gap, Va i 

Winchester, Va i 

Cedar Creek, Va 2 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 8 



Present, also, at West Point ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; Glendale ; Chantilly ; Antietam ; Freder- 
icksburg ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; Fisher s Hill ; Hatcher s Run ; Sailor s Creek ; 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Trenton, May 21, 1861. Arriving at Washington June 29th, it was assigned to the 
First Jersey Brigade, and during the following fall and winter was stationed in Virginia, near Fairfax Seminary. 
In April, 1862, the division-- Franklin s moved to Yorktown and joined the Peninsular army, the brigade, 
under General Taylor, becoming the First Brigade of Slocum s (ist) Division, Sixth Corps. The regiment was 
slightly engaged at West Point, and at Gaines s Mill encountered a severe musketry fire, losing 21 killed, 80 
wounded, and 58 missing; Major David Hatfield fell, mortally wounded, at Gaines s Mill. The brigade was 
engaged at Manassas, August 27, 1862, in the action at Bull Run Bridge, in which the First Regiment lost 132 
in killed, wounded and prisoners ; General George W. Taylor, the brigade commander, was mortally wounded in 
this affair, while the brigade lost 339 out of about 1,100 engaged. General Brooks commanded the division at 
Salem Church, a bloody repulse in which the regiment lost 7 killed, 71 wounded, and 27 missing; Colonel Col- 
lett was killed at the close of the action. In the Wilderness campaign the divsion was commanded by General 
Wright :. the casualties of the regiment at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, May 5-14, were 20 killed, 156 
wounded, and 48 missing. During all its active service it had been in the First Brigade, First Division, Sixth 
Corps. It was mustered out June 23, 1864; the recruits and reenlisted men were formed into a battalion of 
three companies which remained in the corps during the war. 



244 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRD NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
FIRST JERSEY BRIGADE WRIGHT S DIVISION -- SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE W. TAYLOR ; BRIG. GEN. (Killed). 



(2) COL. HENRY W. BROWN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, Ix PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 

2 

I 



I 
I 

3 






15 

*7 

II 

12 
IS 
II 

14 

*5 
18 

17 




15 

18 
J 3 

12 

J 9 
ii 

15 
16 

21 
17 











I 






9 

5 
10 

7 
8 

8 

7 
8 

10 

8 




9 

5 
10 

7 
8 

8 

7 

9 
10 

8 


18 
118 

124 
124 

118 

J3 1 
109 

118 

I2 5 
128 

I2 5 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


T , 


K . 


Totals. 


9 


148 


J 57 


I 


80 


81 


1,238 





157 killed = 12.6 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 537 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 9. 



BATTLES. 

Scout duty, Va. (1861). 
Munson s Hill, Va . . . . . 
Burke s Station, Va . . . 

Williamsburg, Va 

Gaines s Mill, Va 

Glendale,Va 

Manassas, Va 

Crampton s Gap, Md . . 



K. & M.W 
i 

2 
I 
I 

58 
I 

6 



K. & M.W. 

22 



BATTLES. 

Salem Heights, Va 

Gettysburg, Pa ............................ i 

Wilderness, Va., May 5 ..................... 4 

Spotsylvania, May 8th ...................... 13 

Spotsylvania, May gth ...................... 5 

Spotsylvania, May loth ..................... 7 

Spotsylvania, May 1 2th ..................... 1 8 

Cold Harbor, Va .......................... 4 



Present, also, at West Point ; Glendale ; Chantilly ; Antietam ; Fredericksburg ; Rappahannock Station ; 
Mine Run ; Petersburg ; Opequon ; Cedar Creek ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. The regiment was fully organized, officered, and equipped by May 18, 1861, but was not mustered 
into the United States service until June 4th. It left the State, 1,051 strong, on June 28, 1861, and was placed 
in the First Jersey Brigade, consisting of the First, Second, Third and Fourth New Jersey regiments ; the brigade, 
under command of General Kearny, was encamped for several months at Fairfax Seminary, engaged on outpost 
duty and occasional scouting expeditions. In 1862 the brigade was assigned to the First Division (Slocum s), 
Sixth Corps, in which division it served during the war without further change. The regiment met with a severe 
loss at Gaines s Mill, its casualties on that field amounting to 35 killed, 136 wounded, and 44 missing ; total, 215. 
The brigade, under Colonel Brown, encountered more hard fighting at Salem Church, the loss of the regiment in 
that battle aggregating n killed, 69 wounded, and 15 missing. Its hardest fighting and greatest percentage of 
loss occurred in the Wilderness campaign, where the remnant of the regiment was engaged in some of the most 
desperate fighting of the war ; its losses during the bloody contest at Spotsylvania, were 20 killed, 98 wounded, 
and 30 missing ; total, 148. On the day after the assault at Cold Harbor, the regiment was ordered home for 
muster-out. The recruits and reenlisted men were consolidated into one company which remained in the First 
Division, being known as Company A, Third New Jersey Battalion. 



THREK HUNDRED FKJHTING REGI.MKNTS. 



FOURTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
FIRST JERSEY BRIGADE- -WRIGHT S DIVISION HIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES H. SIMPSON i t. $., B. *., BVT. BRIU. UKN. U. 8. A. 
(8) COL. WILLIAM H. HATCH (Killed). 



(8) COL. WILLIAM C. BTRNEY ; BVT. MAJOU-OKN. U. S. V. 
(4) COL. EDWAIil) L. CAMPBELL ; BVT. BKIU. GKN. U.S. V. 



COMPANIES. 


KlI.I.Kll AND DlKU OK WolTNDS. 


DIED or 1 MM v-i . ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men . 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


2 

I 










2 


I 

5 
17 
16 

9 

3 
14 
M 

5 
18 

M 


3 
16 

7 

16 

9 
3 
U 
14 

15 

18 

16 











1 

I 






10 

9 
10 

9 

1 1 

7 
1 6 

10 

9 

I 2 




10 

9 

10 

9 

1 1 

* 

16 
1 1 

10 

I 2 


2 3 

208 

198 
204 

93 
162 

187 
178 

77 
,65 

172 




B 


C , 


I) 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


156 


161 


2 


I0 3 


105 


1,867 





Original enrollment, 909 ; killed, 131 ; percentage, 14.4. 
Total of killed and wounded, 588 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 27. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Picket, Va., Oct. 28, 1861 i 

Gaines s Mill, Va 52 

Manassas, Va 2 

Crampton s Gap, Md 12 

Antietam, Md i 

Fredericksburg, Va 1 1 

Wilderness, Va 27 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 31 

Cold Harbor, Va * 6 

Snicker s Gap, Va i 

Winchester, Va 2 

Opequon, Va 5 

Cedar Creek, Va 5 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 5 



Present, also, at West Point ; Seven Days Battle ; Chantilly ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. Organized at Trenton, and mustered in August 19, 1861. It left the State the next day, proceed 
ing to Virginia where it was assigned to the famous Jersey Ilrigade, then under command of General Kearny. 
The brigade was encamped in Virginia for several months, engaged on picket duty and in perfecting its drill and 
discipline. On March 7, 1862, it broke camp and participated in the advance on Manassas. In April, the bri 
gade embarked for the Peninsula, and upon the evacuation of Yorktown sailed up the York to West Point where 
it disembarked and was present at the action which occurred there. At Gaines s Mill the regiment, in company 
with the Eleventh Pennsylvania Reserves, held its ground after all other troops had fallen back, and being sur 
rounded was forced to surrender; the casualties were 45 killed, 103 wounded, and 437 captured or missing. 
The Jersey Brigade distinguished itself in Slocum s brilliant and victorious charge up the mountain-side at 
Crampton s Gap, the brigade being commanded by General Torbert ; the loss in the Fourth was 10 killed and 
26 wounded. At First Fredericksburg the regiment lost 9 killed, 35 wounded, and 36 missing ; Colonel Hatch 
was mortally wounded there. In the fighting at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, the regiment lost 23 killed, 
139 wounded, and 23 missing; total, 185. A large number of recniits and conscripts were received in the latter 
part of 1864, but the most of them joined after the fighting was about over. 



246 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
SECOND JERSEY BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. SAMUEL H. STARR; . S. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM J. SEWELL ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. ASHBEL W. ANGELL. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED op WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 



2 
I 

2 

1 
2 
2 
I 


I 

2 3 
1 1 

8 

IS 
10 

ii 
10 

8 

12 
17 


I 
24 
1 1 
10 

16 

12 
II 
I I 
10 

J 4 

1 8 

















15 

4 
4 

9 
10 

8 

10 

1 1 

5 
9 




15 

4 
4 
9 

10 

8 

10 

ii 

5 
9 


15 
2 33 
129 

158 
246 
140 
1 08 

155 

137 

*34 
114 




B 


c . 


D. 


E . 


F 


G 


H 


T . 


K 


Totals 


1 2 


126 


138 





85 


85 


1,569 





Original enrollment, 861 ; killed, 98; percentage, 11.3. 
Total of killed and wounded, 524 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 10. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Yorktown, Va 4 

Williamsburg, Va 24 

Fair Oaks, Va 6 

Malvern Hill, Va 2 

Manassas, Va 12 

Chancellorsville, Va 28 

Gettysburg, Pa 25 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

McLean s Ford, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 18 

Spotsylvania, Va i 

North Anna, Va 3 

Cold Harbor, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va i o 

Poplar Spring Church, Va i 



Present, also, at Gleridale ; Malvern Hill; Bristoe Station (1862); Chantilly ; Fredericksburg ; Kelly s 
Ford ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; Deep Bottom ; Boydton Road. 

NOTES. Organized, officered, and equipped by August 22, 1861, and on the following week it went to Wash 
ington, encamping on Meridian Hill. It was assigned to the Second Jersey Brigade, which was composed of the 
Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth New Jersey regiments. This brigade afterwards became the Third Brigade of the 
Second (Hooker s) Division, Third Corps. In December, 1861, it moved to Budd s Ferry, Md., about 45 miles 
below Washington, where it remained on duty until April, 1862, when it joined McClellan s Army, then in front 
of Yorktown. Hooker s Division did most of the fighting at Williamsburg, in which action the regiment lost 9 
killed, 67 wounded, and 27 missing. At Chancellorsville the brigade was conspicuous for its efficiency, the Fifth 
capturing three of the enemy s flags ; its casualties there were 13 killed, 102 wounded, and 6 missing, out of 320 
present, as officially reported. General Mott, the gallant commander of the brigade, being wounded, Colonel 
Sewall succeeded him during the rest of the action ; General Berry, the division general, was killed. At Gettys 
burg, the casualties were 13 killed, 65 wounded, and 16 missing; Colonel Sewall was among the wounded. In 
March, 1864, upon the discontinuance of the Third Corps, the brigade was transferred to Mott s Division of the 
Second Corps ; it ceased to exist as a distinctive Jersey Brigade, as four regiments from other States were added. 
The losses of the regiment in May and June, 1864, were 15 killed, 129 wounded, and 12 missing. It was 
mustered-out at Trenton, N. J., September 7, 1864; the recruits and reenlisted men were consolidated into a 
battalion of four companies, and transferred to the Seventh New Jersey. 



TlIHKK llL NDHKD FlCiHTlNU RKGIMKNTS. 



247 



SIXTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
SECOND JERSEY BRIGADE HUMPHKEYS S DIVISION- TIIIKD COUPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES T. IIATFIELI). 

(2) COL. OERSHOM MOTT ; MAJOH-QRX. 



(8) COL. GEORGE C. BUHLING ; UVT. BRIO. GRN. 
(4) COL. STEIMIKN R. GILKYSON. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or Worxus. 


DIED OK DIHKASE, ACCIDENTH, IN PKIMON, &e. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Meu. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Stafl" 


2 




I 










* 

16 
I I 
12 
I I 

3 
10 

4 
1 1 

3 

13 


2 
16 
I I 

1 3 
1 1 

J 3 

10 

4 
1 1 

3 
J3 


I 










* 


7 
6 
6 

7 

3 
10 

8 

9 
10 

5 


r 

7 
6 

6 

7 
3 

10 

8 

9 
10 

5 


5 
130 

142 
130 
123 
123 
1 06 
1 29 
38 

3 2 
126 




B 


c 


D . 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 




Totals 


3 


124 


127 


i 


7 1 


7 2 


1,294 





Original enrollment, 898; killed, 115; percentage, 12.8. 
Total of killed and wounded, 433; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 8. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Williamsburg, Va 59 

Fair Oaks, Va 7 

Manassas, Va 21 

Chancellorsville, Va i r 

Gettysburg, Pa 5 

McLean s Ford, Va i 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 9 

Spotsylvania, Va 3 

Petersburg Assault, Va 8 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 2 

Guerillas, Va., May 18, 1864 i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Glendale ; Malvern Hill; Bristoe Station (1862); Chantilly : Fredericksburg ; 
Kelly s Ford ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor ; Deep Bottom ; Peebles s Farm ; Boydton 
Road. 

NOTES. Organized August 19, i86i,and leftthe State September loth, with 898 officers and men. Arriving 
at Washington it encamped on Meridian Hill with the Second Jersey Brigade. In December, 1861, the 
brigade was ordered on duty along the Lower Potomac, where it joined Hooker s Division. It took the field in 
April, 1862, moving up the Peninsula with the Third Corps. The brigade was in the thick of the fight at 
Williamsburg, and the "Jersey Blues" won a place in history that day ; the losses there in the Sixth Regiment were 
39 killed, 74 wounded, and 26 missing ; among the killed were Lieutenant-Colonel John P. Van Leer, who was 
in command at that battle, and Adjutant Aaron Wilks. Lieutenant-Colonel Mott of the Fifth was transferred to 
the colonelcy of the Sixth soon after this battle. The brigade, under General Mott, distinguished itself at Chan 
cellorsville by the persistency with which it held its ground and repulsed the repeated advances of the enemy , 
the regiment lost there 6 killed, 53 wounded, ami 8 missing. The brigade was transferred in March, 1864, to 
the Second Corps, becoming the First Brigade (McAllister s) of Mott s (4th) Division. This division was 
subsequently merged into Birney s (3d) Division, and later on, Mott succeeded Birney. The losses of the regi 
ment during May and June, 1864, were 15 killed, 99 wounded, and 6 missing. It fought in the ranks of the 
Second Corps until August, 1 864, when it was ordered home for muster-out. The recruits and reenlisted men 
remaining in the field, were transferred to the Eighth New Jersey. 



248 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 



SECOND JERSEY BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOSEH W. EEVERE ; BRIO. GEN. (2) COL. LOUIS R. FRANCINE ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. (Killed). 

(3) COL. FRANCIS PRICE ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 



3 




2 
2 
I 
I 
I 




. 

T 9 
ii 

i? 

12 

*3 

II 

II 
12 

8 

12 


I 

9 
14 
17 

12 

15 
!3 
12 

13 

9 

12 


I 








I 






I 

16 
10 

18 
18 

9 
3 

5 
5 

12 
M 


2 

16 

10 

18 
18 

9 
3 
6 

15 

12 
14 


9 
302 

280 

2 73 
326 

215 
231 

220 

2 73 
206 

238 




B 


c 


D. 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


II 


126 


137 


2 


121 


123 


2,583 





Original enrollment, 920; killed, 102; percentage, n. 
Total of killed and wounded, 485 : died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 18. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Petersburg, Va. June 18, 1864 15 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1864 5 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 8 

Picket, Va., Nov., 1864 5 

Armstrong House, Va 2 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 

Farmville, Va i 



Bristoe Station (1862) ; Chantilly; McLean s Ford; 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Williamsburg, Va 40 

Oak Grove, Va i 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Manassas, Va 6 

Fredericksburg, Va i 

Chancellorsville, Va 10 

Gettysburg, Pa 24 

Wilderness, Va 3 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Fair Oaks ; Glendale 
Kelly s Ford ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Deep Bottom ; Peeble s Farm ; Boydton Road ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Seven companies proceeded to Washington, Sept. 19, 1861 ; the others followed on Oct. 3d; the 
whole regiment, 920 strong, encamping on Meridian Hill, where it remained until December, when it moved to 
Budd s Ferry, Md. In company with the Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth New Jersey Volunteers, it formed what was 
known as the Second Jersey Brigade, and was assigned to Hooker s Division, Third Corps. It was hotly engaged 
at Williamsburg, where its casualties aggregated 26 killed, 90 wounded, and 7 missing. General Mott com 
manded the brigade, and General Berry the division at Chancellorsville, a battle in which the brigade rendered good 
service, and the Seventh captured five stands of colors ; the Seventh lost there 6 killed, and 41 wounded. The 
brigade was commanded at Gettysburg by Colonel George C. Burling (Sixth New Jersey), the losses in the regi 
ment amounting to 15 killed, 86 wounded, and 13 missing; Colonel Francine was mortally wounded in the battle 
of the second day. In March, 1864, the Third Corps was merged into the Second, the brigade being assigned to 
Mott s Division. The regiment encountered hard fighting at Spotsylvania, and in the assault on Petersburg, June 
1 8th ; its losses in May and June, 1864, amounting to 12 killed, 97 wounded, and 60 captured or missing. In 
November, 1864, the men of the Fifth New Jersey Battalion were transferred to the Seventh, and it also received 
a large number of conscripts and recruits. The original members were mustered out at Trenton, N. J., Oct. 7, 
1864, but enough men remained in the field to preserve the organization. 



THKKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



1MU 



EIGHTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
SECOND JERSEY BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. ADOLPH J. JOHNSON. 



(8) COL. JOHN RAMSEY ; BVT. MAJOR-QW. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS. Is PUIHON, <fcc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


( >fficera. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 




2 



2 
I 
I 
I 
I 






16 

i? 
16 

17 
18 

i? 
14 
18 

17 

7 


I 

16 

7 

18 

7 
20 

18 

i5 

19 
18 

7 










I 








4 

9 

15 

8 

10 
8 
8 

I 2 
20 

5 




4 
9 

5 
8 

10 

8 
9 

I 2 
20 

5 


2O 
234 
249 

245 
236 

2 3 
218 

228 
263 
270 
213 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


T 


K 


Totals 


9 


167 


176 


i 


109 


I IO 


2,407 





Of the 889 originally enrolled, 127 were killed 14.2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 624; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 21. 



BATTLM. K. A M \\ 

Williamsburg, Va 42 

Fair Oaks, Va., June 16,1862 i 

Glendale, Va 2 

Kettle Run, Va., Aug. 27, 1862 2 

Manassas, Va i o 

Chancellorsville, Va 32 

Gettysburg, Pa 12 

Wilderness, Va 1 1 

Totopotomoy, Va 4 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 7 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 4 

Picket Line, Petersburg 7 

Deep Bottom, Va 4 

Boydton Road, Va 12 

Hatcher s Run, Va 20 

Armstrong House, Va., March 25, 1865 i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 4 

Farmville, Va i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Malvern Hill ; Chantilly ; Fredericksburg ; Kelly s Ford ; Mine Run ; Spotsyl- 
vania ; North Anna ; Cold Harbor ; Poplar Spring Church ; Amelia Springs ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The above enrollment may give an erroneous idea of the size of the regiment. Fully one- third 
vere not enrolled until after the regiment was through its hardest fighting ; they were conscripts, of whom over 
400 deserted, most of them deserting before they joined the regiment, although their names went to swell the 
enrollment. The Eighth left the State October i, 1861, and joined the Second Jersey Brigade at Meridian Hill, 
Washington. Having been assigned to Hooker s Division it fought at Williamsburg, where it lost 35 killed, 122 
wounded, and 4 missing; total, 161 ; Major Peter M. Ryerson was among the killed. At Chancellorsville, the 
division (Berry s) took a prominent part, the Jersey Brigade encountering there the severest fighting in its expe 
rience. The Eighth lost in that battle, 18 killed, 101 wounded, and 6 missing, out of 268 muskets officially 
reported present. Humphreys commanded Hooker s old division at Gettysburg, where the casualties of the 
regiment amounted to 7 killed, 38 wounded, and 2 missing, out of a small number engaged. When the Thiid 
Corps was broken up, in March, 1864, the division was transferred to the Second Corps and General Mott placed 
in command. The regiment fought in all the succeeding battles of the Second Corps, earning laurels for itself 
and for its State. At Deep Bottom, August 16, 1864, it numbered only about 100 men; under the gallant Ram 
sey it won official mention for its admirable bearing in that battle. 



250 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ELEVENTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
CARE S BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. ROBERT McALLISTER ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. JOHN SCHOONOVER. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 


2 
I 
2 
2 



I 
I 

I 




6 
1 1 

6 

17 

16 

10 

15 

13 

26 

1 1 


r 

6 

13 

7 

r 9 

18 

10 

16 

M 

27 
1 1 








* 








5 
1 1 

10 

12 
12 
12 
14 

I? 

5 
9 




5 
1 1 

10 

12 
12 

I 2 

14 

7 

5 
9 


15 

J 57 
1 68 

184 

i95 
172 

174 

181 
170 
178 
162 




B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F . 


G. 


H. 


T . 


K. ... , 


Totals . 


I I 


J3 1 


142 





107 


107 


^75 6 





Gettysburg, Pa. . 
Mine Run, Va . . . 
Wilderness, Va . . 
Spotsylvania, Va. 
Barker s Mills, Va 



Original enrollment, 979 ; killed, 117; percentage, 11.9. 
Total of killed and wounded, 502 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 19. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Petersburg Assault, Va 10 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Picket, Petersburg, Va 7 

Boydton Road, Va 7 

Hatcher s Run, Va 4 

Armstrong House, Va 2 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 4 

Chancellorsville, Va 35 

40 

ii 



i 
10 



Skirmishes, Va 2 

Present, also, at Wapping Heights ; Kelly s Ford ; North Anna ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor ; Deep 
Bottom ; Peebles s Farm ; Amelia Springs ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Eleventh reported at Washington, August 26, 1862, and moved directly into Virginia where, in 
November, it was assigned to Carr s (ist) Brigade. Sickles s (2d) Division, Third Corps. The regiment made 
a splendid fight at Chancellorsville, the division, under General Berry, taking a very prominent part ; Berry was 
killed and the regimental casualties amounted to 18 killed, 146 wounded, and 5 missing; total, 169, out of about 
500 present for duty. The division was commanded by Humphreys, at Gettysburg, and in the battle of the 
second day fought at the Emmettsburg Road. The Eleventh took 275 officers and men into that action, losing 
17 killed, 124 wounded, and 12 missing ; total, 153. Major Phillip J. Kearney was mortally wounded in this 
battle. In the action at Locust Grove (Mine Run), November 27, 1863, the regiment lost 6 killed, 20 wounded, 
and 4 missing. This was the last battle of the Third Corps, for in March, 1864, the War Department issued the 
foolish and unjust order directing that the gallant organization be broken up and transferred to the Second Corps. 
The Eleventh thereupon became part of McAllister s Brigade, Mott s Division, Second Corps, in which Corps it 
fought during the remainder of the war. This brigade distinguished itself in the action at the Boydton Road, 
Colonel McAllister receiving a brevet brigadier s commission for his services on that field. A large number of 
conscripts were sent to the regiment in 1864-5, but the fighting was done, for the most part, by the original 
regiment. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



251 



TWELFTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
SMITH S BRIGADE -- HA YS S DIVISION- SECOND COUPS. 



(1) COL. ROBERT C. JOHNSON. 



(2) COL. JOHN* II. \VILLETTS. 



COL. JOHN WILUAN: HVT. BRIO. OEM. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOTNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, Ix Piii.sox, Ac. 


Tnuil 
Ktinillinent. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officer*. 


Men. 


Total. 




I 
i 




I 


* 

4 
17 
I? 

9 

21 
26 

5 

16 

18 

5 


I 

5 

7 
18 

10 

22 
27 

16 

I? 

18 
16 







* 




* 


2 

I 

8 

2 

2 
I 

7 

5 
1 1 

10 




12 
I I 

8 

12 
12 
I I 

7 

5 
1 1 

10 


18 

93 

179 

1 88 
170 
1 80 

83 
77 
176 
200 
184 


Con"* psny A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


9 


1 68 


177 





99 


99 


1,848 





Original enrollment, 992 ; killed, 163 ; percentage, 16.8. 

Enrollment prior to Lee s surrender, 1,548 ; killed, 177 ; percentage, 11.4. 

Total killed and wounded, 587 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 14. 



BATTLES. K.&M.u. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 7 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Ream s Station, Va 4 

Boydton Road, Va 5 

Dabney s Mills, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 4 

Place Unknown i 



BATTLES. K.&.M.W 

Chancellorsville, Va 48 

Gettysburg, Pa 28 

Bristoe Station, Va 2 

Morton s Ford, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 23 

Spotsylvania, Va 27 

North Anna, Va 4 

Cold Harbor, Va 20 

Present, also, at Auburn Mills ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy ; Strawberry Plains ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. Left the State September 7, 1862, joining the main Army in December, when it was placed in the 
Second Brigade (Win. Hays s), Third Division (French s), Second Corps. In this brigade it fought at Chancel 
lorsville, its first battle; its casualties there were 24 killed, 132 wounded, and 22 missing; total, 178. General 
Alex. Hays led the division at Gettysburg, and General Thomas A. Smyth, the brigade. During that battle the 
Twelfth distinguished itself on the afternoon of the second day by a gallant charge of four companies, in which 
they captured the Bliss barn, a building situated midway between the lines, and filled with the enemy s sharp 
shooters ; seven Confederate officers and 92 men were captured by the Jerseymen in this notable affair ; but, not 
without severe loss to the four companies engaged. The losses of the entire regiment at Gettysburg were 23 
killed, 83 wounded, and 9 missing. Upon the reorganization of the Army, in March, 1864, the regiment was placed 
in Carroll s (3d) Brigade of Gibbon s (2d) Division, a famous brigade in which seven States were represented. 
The Twelfth crossed the Rapidan with 425 men, of which number 177 were killed or wounded during the bloody 
week of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania; Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas H. Davis, who commanded at these 
battles, was killed at Spotsylvania. The Twelfth made a charge at North Anna, deployed in one rank, which 
General Smyth pronounced the finest he ever saw. Another hard fight, this time at Cold Harbor, and the 
regiment was reduced to 90 muskets. In February, 1865, Lieutenant-Colonel Willian of the Eighth New 
Jersey was promoted to the colonelcy of the Twelfth. 



252 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FOURTEENTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
MORRIS S BRIGADE RICKETTS S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM S. TRUEX ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. CALDWELL K. HALL ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(3) COL. JACOB J. JANEWAY. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 
I 



I 
I 




2 
I 






12 
12 
10 
II 

15 
17 

7 
23 
17 

J 5 


I 

J 3 
J 3 

10 
12 

16 

17 

7 

25 

18 

T 5 








* 


* 




*7 
9 

5 

12 
I I 
I I 
I I 

8 
ii 

5 




17 

9 

5 

12 
I 1 
II 
II 

8 
ii 

] 5 


16 
118 

"3 
J 53 

133 

123 

i37 
1 08 
114 

137 
1 60 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


J 39 


147 





I IO 


I 10 


1,312 





147 killed = ii. 2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 524 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 32. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Mine Run, Va 17 

Wilderness, Va 2 

Spotsylvania, Va 5 

Hanover Court House, Va. (1864) i 

Cold Harbor, Va 57 

Picket, Va., June 6, 1864 i 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Monocacy, Md 40 

Opequon, Va 12 

Fisher s Hill, Va i 

Cedar Creek, Va 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 3 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 



Present, also, at Wapping Heights ; Kelly s Ford ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort Stedman ; Sailor s Creek ; Appo- 
mattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Freehold, N. J., and left the State, 1,007 strong, on September 2d, 1862. Colonel 
Truex had served as major, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hall as adjutant, of the Fifth N. J. V. It was ordered on 
guard duty along the B. & O. R. R. near Monocacy, Md., where it remained until June, 1863, when it moved to 
Harper s Ferry. In the following month, upon Lee s invasion, the garrison (French s Division) was withdrawn 
to Frederick, where it joined the Army of the Potomac, soon after Gettysburg, becoming the Third Division of 
the Third Corps. The regiment was under fire at Locust Grove (Mine Run) for the first time, where it lost 14 
killed, and 49 wounded ; its casualties were the largest, numerically, of any regiment engaged in the various 
actions incidental to the Mine Run campaign. Upon the discontinuance of the third Corps, March, 1864, the 
division was transferred to the Sixth Corps as Ricketts s Third Division, the regiment being placed in Morris s 
(ist) Brigade. Its casualties in May and June, 1864, nearly all of which occurred at Cold Harbor, were 29 
killed, 107 wounded, and 15 missing; the latter were mostly killed. In July the division returned to Maryland 
to meet Early s invasion, and at the Monocacy the regiment lost 24 killed, 87 wounded, and 29 missing, out of 
350 men engaged. In the battle of the Opequon, Major Peter Vredenburgh was killed while leading a charge 
on a battery, the regiment losing in that action 6 killed, and 56 wounded. Colonel Truex commanded the 
brigade in the final and victorious assault of the corps on the works at Petersburg. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS 



258 



FIFTEENTH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY. 
FIRST JERSEY BRIGADE -- WRIGHT S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 

(l)Cou SAMUEL FOWLEK. (2) COL. WILLIAM II. PENKOSE, B. . HVT. BRIO. OKN. IT. 8. A. 

(3) COL. EDWAKD L. CAMPBELL; BVT. Bitio. OEN. U. . V. 



CON PA NIX*. 


KM i in AN DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DlKl) OF ]>IKASK, AcClUENTfl, [N I lUSON, &C. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. * 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

2 



2 
I 



I 



I 


2 
28 
2-J 
22 

34 

22 
21 
16 

2 5 
7 
18 


3 

3 

2 7 

24 

35 

22 

22 

16 

2 5 
7 

19 



* 

1 









7 
IO 

3 
5 

4 

I 2 
1 2 
I I 
16 
I I 




7 
1 1 

3 
>5 
M 

12 
I 2 
I I 
16 

i r 


5 
172 

170 
171 

85 

165 
164 
170 
161 

55 
J 74 


Company *\ 


B 


C . 


D . 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H. 


T 


K. 


Totals . 


8 


232 


240 


1 


3 1 


3 2 


1,702 





240 killed = 14.1 per cent. 

Of the 947 originally enrolled, 190 were killed == 20 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 856; died in Confederate prisons (previously included),. 19. 



BATTLES. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 
Salem Heights, Va. 
Gettysburg, Pa. . . . 
Brandy Station, Va. 



K.&M.W. 
. 8 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

North Anna, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 18 

Winchester, Va 4 

Opequon, Va 9 

Fisher s Hill, Va 4 

Cedar Creek, Va 27 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 3 



Wilderness, Va 7 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8 31 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 10 5 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 80 

Present, also, at Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; Hanover C. H. (1864) ; Weldon Railroad ; Strasburg ; 
Charlestown ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort Stedman ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Fifteenth left the State Aug. 27, 1862, with 947 officers and men. Colonel Fowler was forced 
to resign within a few months on account of ill health, and died before the close of the war. He was succeeded 
by Penrose, then a Lieutenant in the Third United States Infantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell had served 
with honor in the Third New Jersey, and, as Colonel Penrose was in command of the brigade much of the time, 
led the Fifteenth in most of its battles. The regiment joined the Army of the Potomac at Harper s Ferry on 
October i, 1862, and was assigned to the First Jersey Brigade, Brooks s (ist) Division, Sixth Corps ; it remained 
in the First Division during its entire term of service. It was under fire at the first battle of Fredericksburg, sus 
taining a small loss, but in the second battle at that place Salem Church it lost 24 killed, 126 wounded, and 
4 missing. On May 4, 1864, the regiment crossed the Rapidan with 15 officers and 429 muskets available in 
action; nearly 300 of these fell at Spotsylvania, the muster-out rolls bearing the names of 116 who were killed 
or mortally wounded there. In two weeks the command was reduced to 6 officers and 136 muskets. The rem 
nant of the regiment fought under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, where they sustained another terrible per 
centage of loss at Cedar Creek ; Major Lambert Boeman was killed in that action. The rolls of the Fifteenth 
were swelled by large accessions of conscripts and substitutes who joined in the winter of 1864-5, but not 
most of the fighting was over. The loss of life fell largely on the old regiment. 



254 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY (80TH PA. VOLS.) 
MINTY S BRIGADE GARRARD S DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS, A. C. 



(1) COL. GEORGE C. WYNKOOP. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM B. SIPES. 



(3) COL. CHARLES C. McCORMICK , BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment, 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



I 
I 

T 

1 

* 


2 




1 1 

7 
8 

4 

9 
10 

M 

7 
6 

3 

7 
8 


2 
I I 

8 

9 
4 
10 

IO 

J 5 

7 
6 

5 
7 
8 





* 

3 

i 

i 





16 
20 

M 
20 

18 
9 

12 
I I 

17 

24 

14 
IO 


16 

20 

14 
2 3 

J 9 

9 

12 
I I 

18 
24 

14 

10 


24 
222 
211 

215 
190 

196 
2I 7 
2O2 
203 
214 
2O6 
2OI 
2OI 


Company A 


B 


C 


D 


E . 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


8 


94 


IO2 


5 


I8 5 


190 


2,502 





BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Lebanon, Tenn., May 5, 1862. .... 4 

McMinnville, Tenn., July 6. 1862. . i 

Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 13, 1862 n 

Verbilla, Tenn.. Aug. 9, 1862 I 

Gallatin, Tenn., Aug. 21, 1862 .... 2 

Fayetteville, Tenn., Sept., 9. 1862. i 

Brentwood, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1862. . i 

Bear Wallow, Ky.. Sept. 20, 1862. . i 

Lavergne, Tenn., Oct. 8, 1862. ... i 

Bowling Green, Ky., Oct. 22, 1862. i 

Stone s River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862 5 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Unionville, Tenn., March 6, 1863. . 3 

Snow Hill, Tenn., April 3, 1863 ... 2 

Shelbyville, Tenn., June 27, 1863.. 9 

Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 18, 1863 . 6 

Mission Ridge, Tenn.. Sept. 21, 1863 2 

Cumberland Mountains, Oct. 4, 63 I 

Dallas, Ga., May 27, 1864 5 

Big Shanty, Ga., June 9, 1864 2 

McAfee s X Roads, June n, 1864. . 2 

Noonday Creek, Ga., June 20, 1864 3 

Flat Rock, Ga.. July 28, 1864 i 

Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 12, 1864 3 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Lovejoy s Station, Aug. 20, 1864. . . 10 

Vining s Station, Sept. 2, 1864 i 

Rome, Ga., Oct. 13, 1864 2 

Lead s X Roads, Nov. i, 1864. ... 2 

Bardstown, Ky.. Dec. 29, 1864 ... 2 

Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865 , . . . 7 

Columbus, Ga., April 16, 1865. ... 2 

Near Macon, Ga., May 5, 1865 .... 2 

Picket Duty 2 

Guerrillas 2 

Place unknown 2 



NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg in the fall of 1861, from companies in various parts of the State. It left 
Harrisburg, December 19, 1861, and went to Jeffersonville, Ind., where it was placed in a Camp of Instruction, 
but after a four weeks stay took the field in Kentucky and Tennessee. The Second and Third Battalions were 
actively engaged, May 5, 1862, in an affair at Lebanon, Tenn. ; the Third Battalion, on July 13, 1862, was over 
powered and captured after a hard contest at Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Seventh distinguished itself by a gallant 
charge through the streets of Shelbyville, Tenn., on June 27, 1863. This charge was made by three companies 
under Captain Davis, who with his men dashed through the main street, up to the public square, in which there 
was a battery commanding the approach. The men rode through the fire of canister up to the muzzles of the 
guns, into the battery, fought for a while over the cannons, and then, aided by troops which entered the town at 
other points, drove the garrison through the streets, out into the country and into the Duck River. The Seventh 
lost two officers killed in this charge. The regiment reenlisted in the spring of 1864, and then accompanied 
Sherman s Army on the Atlanta campaign. It participated, in the spring of 1865, in Wilson s expedition to the 
Gulf, and in Long s Division took part in the daring and successful assault on the enemy s intrenchments at 
Selma, Ala. 



TlIKKE HUNDRED FlOHTiNCi ItEGLM KYI S. 



ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY (108TH PA. VOLS.) 
SPEAR S BRIGADE -- KAUTZ S DIVISION --CAVALRY CORPS, 



(1) COL. JOSIAH HAHLAN. 



(2) COL. SAMUEL P. SPEAR ; BVT. BKIO.-OKN. 



(3) COL. FRANK A. STRATTON ; BVT. Bmo. OBN. 



I uMl 1 \Mt - 


l\n 1 1 li AND DlKI) OK WoUNL>8. 


DlKI> OF DlfKAKE, ACCIIIKNTH, IN PltlHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 
2 
I 



3 
i 




i 



i 
i 




8 
8 

3 

7 
9 
7 
8 

10 

9 

9 
1 1 

9 


* 

9 
10 

4 

7 

22 

8 
8 
10 
10 

9 

12 
IO 












* 





7 

I 2 

3 

18 

*3 

23 
13 

3 

13 

18 

15 

12 


* 

7 

I 2 

!3 
18 

3 

23 
3 
13 

3 

18 

1 5 

12 


2 3 
1 81 

*75 
192 

161 
177 
1 80 
176 
168 

75 

184 

149 
182 




B 


c 


D . 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


1 1 


1 08 


ng 





1 80 


I 80 


2,123 





Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 64. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Suffolk, Va.. May 30, 1862 i 

Franklin, Va., Aug. 31,1862 I 

Cassville, Va.. Oct. 15. 1862 i 

Beaver Dam, Va. Dec. 2, 1862. ... i 

Deserted House, Jan. 30, 1863 .... 2 

Norfolk, Va., Feb. 10, 1863 r 

Suffolk, Va. March 12", 1863 i 

Franklin, Va., March 17, 1863 3 

Suffolk, Va., April 13, 1863 i 

Suffolk, Va.. April 15, 1863 2 

Carrsville, Va., May 17, 1863 i 



BATTLES. K.M.\V. 

Suffolk, Va., June 4, 1863 3 

South Anna, Va. June 26, 1863. ... 2 

Guerrillas, Va., Sept. 12, 1863.. .. i 

Blackwater, Va., Nov. 10, 1863 ... i 

Jarrett s Station, May 7, 1864 4 

Flat Creek Bridge, May 14, 1864 . 5 

City Point, Va., May 17, 1864. ... 3 

Petersburg, Va., June 9, 1864 5 

Petersburg, Va., June 15, 1864 . . i 

Staunton Bridge, June 27, 1864.... 3 

Fair Oaks, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 r 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Ream s Station, June 29, 1864.. .. 27 
Ream s Station, Aug. 25, 1864. . 11 
James River, Va., Oct. 3, 1864.. . . i 

Darby town Road, Oct. 7, 1864 14 

Richmond, Va., Oct. 30, 1864 i 

New Market Heights, Dec. 10, 1864 2 

Guerrillas, Va., Feb. 15, 1865 i 

Five Forks, Va., April i, 1865 7 

Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1863 ... i 

Anderson ville Prison i 

Place unknown 9 



NOTES. The Eleventh was raised originally as an independent regiment under special authority from the 
War Department, but was afterwards placed in the Pennsylvania line. Some of the companies were raised in 
other states ; two came from New York, one from Iowa, one from Ohio, and one from New Jersey. It organ 
ized at Philadelphia, October 5, 1861, and the same month went to Virginia, 1130 strong. After a month s stay 
in a camp of instruction it proceeded to Fort Monroe, where it spent six months, or more in drill and light 
duty. Active service commenced in May, 1862, some of the companies doing duty near Suffolk, while five com 
panies served with General McClellan s Army on the Peninsula. In 1863, the regiment was employed on scout 
ing and outpost duty in the vicinity of Suffolk and the Blackwater, during which several minor affairs or 
skirmishes occurred, with considerable loss in wounded and killed. Over 400 of the men reenlisted in the fall of 
1863, which, with the recruits, preserved the organization of the regiment after its term had expired. In 1864, 
it fought in Kautz s Cavalry Division (afterwards Mackenzie s), and at Ream s Station lost over one hundred in 
killed and wounded, including three officers killed. At Five Forks another sharp contest occurred, in which 
Major Monroe and two officers were killed, together with several of their men. 



256 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES (34TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY). 
FISHER S BRIGADE CRAWFORD S DIVISION FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. SENECA G. SIMMONS, ffi. P., &. S. (Killed). 



(2) COL. JOSEPH W. FISHER ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, <fcc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


4 

2 

2 



I 
1 
I 
I 



2 




13 

7 
18 

ii 

22 
8 

16 
10 

7 
J 5 


4 
IS 

9 

18 

12 
2 3 

9 
i? 

IO 

9 
15 



* 
* 
* 





* 




10 

9 

7 
6 

6 

5 
4 
6 

10 

5 


10 

9 

7 
6 

6 

5 
4 
6 

IO 

5 


1 9 

112 

H5 
9 6 

101 
IOI 

96 

97 
in 

no 

88 




B 


C . 


D. 


E 


F 


G 


H. 


T , 


K 


Totals 


14 


127 


141 





68 


68 


1,046 





141 killed = 13.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 481. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Mechanicsville, Va 16 

Gaines s Mill, Va 13 

Glendale, Va 29 

Manassas, Va 4 

South Mountain, Md 3 

Antietam, Md 4 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 46 

Bristoe Station, Va 3 

Guerillas ; Brentsville, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 16 

Picket, Sept. 16, 1862 i 



Present, also, at Malvern Hill ; Gettysburg ; Mine Run North Anna ; Totopotomoy. 



NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, Pa., June 20, 1861, from companies recruited in the central counties of 
the State. The regiment was immediately assigned to duty at Cumberland, Md., but in August it marched to 
Washington, and joined the division of Pennsylvania Reserves encamped at Tenallytown. It was placed in the First 
Brigade, then commanded by General John F. Reynolds ; the division was commanded by General George A. 
McCall. The Reserves marched into Virginia in October, 1861, where they performed the duties incident to an 
army of occupation until June 9, 1862, when they were ordered to reinforce General McClellan s Peninsular 
Army. The regiment was, soon after, engaged at Mechanicsville, where it received the hottest of the enemy s 
fire. It fought well the next day at Gaines s Mill, and three days later again faced the enemy at Glendale. 
Colonel Simmons was killed there while in command of the brigade ; the regiment losing 10 killed, 57 wounded, 
and 49 missing. It met with another severe loss at Fredericksburg, the casualties in that battle amounting to 18 
killed, 87 wounded, and 61 missing ; total, 166. Major Frank Zentmeyer was among the killed, and the missing 
ones were all killed or wounded. The Fifth participated in the opening battles of General Grant s campaigns in 
Virginia ; Lieutenant-Colonel George Dare, who was in command, was killed at the Wilderness. The regiment left 
the field on May 31, 1864, and proceeded to Harrisburg, where it was mustered-out, June 13, 1864. 



THKEE HUNDRED FIGIITINO KKUIMKNTS. 



EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES (37TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY). 
FISHER S BRIGADE CRAWFORD S DIVISION --FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. C.EOKOE S. HAYS. 



(2) Coi.. SILAS M BAILKY. 



158 killed -- 14.8 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 490; Total of captured and missing, 147. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Mechanicsville, Va 4 

Gaines s Mill, Va 29 

White Oak Swamp, Va i 

Glendale, Va 19 

Manassas, Va 7 



I ll MI-AMES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IUBON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 

l 


1 



2 






I 




Men. 



2O 

22 

3 

9 

7 
14 
15 

7 

21 

5 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
20 

2 3 

!3 
I 1 

7 
14 

! 5 

7 

22 
15 
















5 
4 
4 
6 

7 
8 

8 

9 
8 

9 


* 

5 
4 
4 
6 

7 
8 
8 

9 
8 

9 


7 

116 

95 
97 
116 

88 
95 

1OI 

90 
149 
98 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals . 


5 


153 


I 5 8 





68 


68 


1,062 





BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

South Mountain, Md 22 

Antietam, Md 15 

Fredericksburg, Va 44 

Wilderness, Va 7 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 



Present, also, at Dranesville ; Malvern Hill ; Chantilly. 



NOTES. Organized at Pittsburg, June 28, 1861, arriving at Washington, July 23d. The Reserves took the 
field in October, crossing into Virginia where they were engaged on outpost duty for several months. In May, 
1862, the division advanced to Fredericksburg, but returning immediately embarked for the Peninsula where it 
joined General McClellan s Army, then in front of Richmond. Two weeks later the regiment took part in the 
Seven Days Battles, its losses amounting to 32 killed, 113 wounded, and 85 missing; total, 230. Returning to 
the Rappahannock, the division was transferred to McDowell s Corps afterwards the First. Throughout the 
battle summer and autumn of 1862, the Eighth fought in every engagement, and then the remnant of the gallant 
regiment marched to the field of Fredericksburg. There the Reserves, under Meade, charged a strong position 
of the enemy, and, though successful at points, were finally repulsed, the Eighth losing 131 men, or half its 
number. In February, 1863, the Reserves were ordered into the defences of Washington, having been with 
drawn from active service in order that they might rest and recruit their shattered ranks. The Eighth remained 
there until the spring of 1864, when it rejoined the Army of the Potomac, the division having been again 
assigned to the Fifth Corps. The regiment fought at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, and then on May 17, 
1864, while confronting the. enemy s lines, received the welcome order which announced the expiration of its 
term of service. 
17 



258 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



NINTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES (38TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY). 
JACKSON S BRIGADE MEADE S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. CONRAD F. JACKSON; BVT. BRIG. GEN. (Killed). 



(2) COL. ROBERT ANDERSON. 



(3) MAJOK CHARLES BARNES. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




2 
I 

I 




I 

] 




J 5 
1 1 

14 
13 

M 

M 
7 
J 3 
M 
16 


* 

I? 

12 

IS 

J 3 
H 

H 
8 

T 3 

15 
16 




I 


* 




2 
1 

3 



6 

7 
8 

5 
7 
4 




3 

7 
3 



6 

7 
8 

5 
7 
4- 


I? 

128 

99 
OS 

9 1 
no 

118 

IOI 

114 
104 

IOI 




B 


c 


D 


E . 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


6 


r 3i 


i37 


I 


49 


5 


1,088 





BATTLES. 



137 killed = 12.5 percent. 
Total casualties, 71 killed, 336 wounded, 100 missing. 



K.&M. W. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M. W 



Dranesville, Va 4 

Mechanicsville, Va 2 

Gaines s Mill, Va 12 

Glendale, Va 25 

Manassas, Va 28 

South Mountain, Md 17 



Antietam, Md 31 

Fredericksburg, Va 14 

Culpeper C. H., Va i 

Picket, Sept. 25, 1861 i 

Gunboat Service, June 2, 1862 i 

Place Unknown i 



Present, also, at Malvern Hill ; Gettysburg ; Mine Run ; Wilderness. 



NOTES. Organized at Pittsburg, June 28, 1861, eight of the companies coming from Allegheny County, one 
from Crawford, and one from Beaver. The regiment arrived at Washington, July 26, 1861, where it joined 
McCall s Division of Pennsylvania Reserves, then encamped at Tenallytown, Md. It remained thereuntil October, 
at which time the Reserves marched into Virginia. The regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade, General E. 
O. Ord ; this brigade fought the battle of Dranesville, December 20, 1861, one of the first of the Union victo 
ries. The division marched with McDowell in his advance on Manassas, in the spring of 1862, and then was 
transferred to the Army of the Potomac, where it was actively engaged in the Seven Days Battle. At Glendale it 
made a desperate fight over Cooper s Battery, in which affair it captured the colors of the Tenth Alabama. 
Rejoining McDowell s Corps it fought at Manassas, where it lost 12 killed, 52 wounded, and 35 missing. Closely 
following, came South Mountain and Antietam, the casualties in the latter amounting to 17 killed, and 66 
wounded. General C. F. Jackson, the brigade commander and former Colonel of the Ninth, fell mortally 
wounded at Fredericksburg. In the spring of 1864, the regiment crossed the Rapidan with Grant, but on May 
4th, while in line of battle at the Wilderness ready to go into action, its term of service expired, and the men 
were ordered to return to Washington for muster-out. 



THREE HUXDKKD FlOHTIN(} REGIMENTS. 



259 



TENTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES (39rn PA. INFANTRY). 
FISHER S BRIGADE CRAWFORD S DIVISION- FIFTH COUPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN S. McCALMONT, BB. fl. 

(2) COL. JAMES T. KIRK. 



(3) COL. ADOMItAM J. \VAHXEK : BVT. BRIO. GEN. 

(4) COL. 1KA AY EH. Jn. 



C OXPANIEH. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTO, IN PIUSON. Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment, 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Mi-n. Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
2 




t 


1 

2 



I 




22 

I I 
10 

15 
15 
!? 
M 
5 

23 
1 I 


I 

24 
1 1 

IO 

5 
5 
i? 
IS 

J 7 
23 

12 















1 
4 

5 
6 

3 
3 
3 
5 
4 
9 
4 


i 
4 

5 
6 

3 
3 
3 
5 
4 
9 
4 

47 


4 
126 
106 
109 
1 08 
107 
i 1 1 

I 21 
IOO 

43 

I0 5 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F , 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


7 


J 53 


I 60 





47 


",15 


. 



160 killed 13.9 per cent. 

Died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 14; total casualties 97 killed, 336 wounded, 136 missing ; a large 
proportion of the latter were killed. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Mechanicsville, Va 4 

Gaines s Mill, Va 42 

Glendale, Va 27 

Manassas, Va 22 

South Mountain, Md 8 

Antietam, Mil i 

Fredericksburg, Va 24 



BATTLES. K.&M.NV. 

Gettysburg, Pa 2 

15ristoe Station, Va i 

Manassas Junction, April 15,1 864 2 

Wilderness, Va 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 8 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va i 



Present, also, at Dranesville ; Malvern Hill ; Mine Run ; Totopotomoy. 



NOTES. Recruited in Western Pennsylvania in May, 1861, with rendezvous at Pittsburg. The men were of 
more than usual intelligence and education. Company I was recruited from the students at Allegheny College, 
Meadville, Pa., while Company D came from Jefferson College ; the other companies were composed largely of 
similar material, teachers and pupils serving in the ranks together. The regiment arrived at Washington July 24, 
1 86 1, and joined the Reserves at their Camp of Instruction, Tenallytown, Md. It participated in the brilliant 
success of Ord s Brigade at Dranesville, Va., December 20, 1861, and early in the following spring marched with 
the Reserves in the advance on Manassas. In June, 1862, the division under General McCall was ordered to 
the Peninsula where it was assigned to General Fitz John Porter s Corps the Fifth and fought with Porter 
at Gaines s Mill. The loss of the Tenth in that engagement was 23 killed, 86 wounded, and 25 missing ; total, 
134. After leaving the Peninsula, the Reserves rejoined the First Corps, but owing to their heavy losses in 1862, 
they were ordered soon after the battle of Fredericksburg to return to Washington that they might rest and 
recruit. Hence, they were absent from Ghancellorsville ; but when they heard that their native State was invaded, 
they petitioned for orders to march to its defence, and two of the three brigades, accordingly, rejoined the army 
and fought at Gettysburg. 



260 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES (40TH PA. INFANTRY). 

McCANDLESS S BRIGADE CRAWFORD S DIVISION FlFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS F. GALLAGHER ; BVT. BKIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. SAMUEL M. JACKSON ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




2 
I 
2 
2 
I 



I 
I 



I 


I 

9 

22 

T 9 

22 
25 

8 

23 
T 3 

T I 

22 


I 

21 

23 
21 

24 
26 

8 
24 

M 
i 1 

23 







I 



* 







18 
6 
8 

13 

IT 

1 1 
6 

8 

IS 
16 


* 

18 
6 
8 

14 
ii 

ii 
6 

8 

IS 
16 


18 

I2O 
117 
lOp 
124 
II 9 
I0 7 
9 8 
114 

I2 5 
128 




B . 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H. 


T . 


K 


Totals . 


I I 


185 


196 


I 


112 


IJ 3 


M79 





196 killed = 16.6 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 681 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 22. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Mechanicsville, Va i 

Gaines s Mill, Va. (9 Cos.) 71 

Glendale, Va. (Co. B.) 9 

Manassas, Va 14 

South Mountain, Md 1 6 

Antietam, Md i o 

Fredericksburg, Va 49 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Gettysburg, Pa 5 

Bristoe Station, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va., to 

Spotsylvania, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 6 

Place unknown i 



Present, also, at Dranesville ; Malvern Hill ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Totopoto- 



moy. 



NOTES. The Eleventh sustained the heaviest loss of any regiment in the Pennsylvania Reserves, while its 
percentage of loss is among the largest of any in the war. It was recruited in Western Pennsylvania, and arrived 
July 26, 1 86 1, at Washington, where it was assigned to the Second Brigade, which was then commanded by 
General Meade. At Gaines s Mill, the Eleventh held its position in the face of a terrible fire until the othei- 
troops had been forced to fall back, when, being surrounded by the enemy, it was obliged to surrender; Company 
B was detailed on fatigue duty just before the fight commenced, and thus escaped the fate of their comrades. 
The captured men and officers were exchanged August 5th, rejoining the Army before it left the Peninsula. 
Resuming their place in the First Corps, the Reserves took part in the battles of Manassas and South Mountain ; 
when they entered the field at Antietam, the Eleventh had less than 200 men inline. Some recruits were obtained, 
and some of the wounded returned, so that it went into action at Fredericksburg with 394 officers and men ; of 
these, 21 r were killed or wounded. After a few months of needed rest at Washington the Reserves were assigned 
to the Fifth Corps, in which command they served at Gettysburg and in. the Wilderness campaign. The Eleventh 
was relieved from duty, May 30, 1864, and ordered home for muster-out, the recruits having been transferred to 
the One Hundred and Ninetieth Pennsylvania. 



THREE HUNDRED FUJHTING REGIMENTS. 



THIRTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA RESERVES- - "BUCKT AILS." 
s I:I;IC\I.K -CRAWFORD S DIVISION-- FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS L. KANE; BVT. MAJ. GEN. (2) COL. CHARLES J. BIDDLK. (8) Coi.. HUGH W. McNEIL (Killed). 

(4) COL. CHARLES F. TAYLOR (Killed). (5) MAJOR W. R. HARTS1H >|;N 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIEI; or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIUMON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 

2 
I 
I 
I 



I 



2 

I 




I 

20 

3 

14 

3 
1 1 

M 
18 

1 5 
l l 
1 S 


3 
22 

4 

15 

4 
1 1 

15 
1 8 

i? 

18 

1 5 









I 





I 


* 

7 
7 
9 

9 
1 1 

8 

12 

9 
7 
9 




7 
7 
9 
9 
1 1 

9 

I 2 

9 

7 

10 


16 

"3 
102 

103 
107 
118 

"3 
119 

128 
126 
i 20 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


1 I 


5 1 


162 


2 


88 


90 


1,165 





162 killed 13.9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 604 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 16. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Dranesville, Va 4 

Harrisonburg, Va. (Cos. G, C, H, I) 15 

Cross Keys, Va. (Cos. G, C, H, I) 3 

Mechanicsviile, Va. (Cos. A, B, D, E, F, K) 5 

Gaines s Mill, Va. (Cos. A, B, D, E, F, K) i 

Glendale, Va. (Cos. A, B, D, E, F, K) 15 

Catlett s Station, Va i 

Manassas, Va 7 



BATTLES. K. Jt M \V. 

South Mountain, Md 19 

Antietam, Md 1 1 

Fredericksburg, Va 35 

Gettysburg, Pa 12 

Wilderness, Va 7 

Spotsylvania, Va 23 

Bethesda Church, Va 4 



Present, also, at New Creek ; Malvern Hill ; Williamsport ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Totopotomoy. 

NOTES. Known also as the First Pennsylvania Rifles, or Kane Rifles. It was recruited in April, 1861, 
from the lumbermen of the Pennsylvania forests ; the men were strong and hardy, each being a skillful marks 
man, armed with his own rifle. The regiment was subsequently armed with Sharpe s rifles, and then again with 
Spencer seven-shooters. Each man wore a bucktail on his hat, and hence their name ; one which became 
famous throughout the army, because of the extraordinary efficiency of the regiment. It took the field in June, 
proceeding to Cumberland, Md., in which vicinity it was actively engaged on scout and picket duty until 
October, when it joined its division the Pennsylvania Reserves at Washington. In the spring of 1862, four 
companies, under Colonel Kane, served in the Shenandoah Valley, while the others accompanied the Reserves to 
the Peninsula. The regiment was united again at Manassas, in which battle they were engaged, and then 
marched with General McClellan to Antietam, where Colonel McNiel was killed. The Bucktails met with a 
severe loss at Fredericksburg, their casualties there amounting to 19 killed, 1 13 wounded, and 29 missing ; total, 
161. At Gettysburg the brigade, led by the gallant McCandless, rendered good service near Little Round Top. 
Colonel Taylor, who was killed there, was a brave officer and a gentleman of culture and accomplishments ; he 
was a brother of Bayard Taylor. The Bucktails did good work under Grant at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, 
after which they were mustered out at Harrisburg, Pa., June 1 1, 1864, their term of service having expired. 



262 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
PAUL S BRIGADE ROBINSON S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



COL. RICHARD COULTER ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS. IN PRISON, &o. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
2 

2 
I 

I 

3 

T 




IO 

24 
26 

20 

24 
24 

26 

21 

33 
16 


2 
IO 
26 
26 
22 

2 5 
24 
26 
22 
36 


T 

* 

I 
2 


I 

10 

15 
21 

19 

25 

16 

25 
1 1 


2 
10 

2 I 
20 

2 5 

18 

2 5 
1 1 

17 


17 
190 

2O6 
22O 
208 
223 
I 99 
203 
I 9 4 
2O6 

1 86 




B . 


C . 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals . 


1 2 


224 


236 


4 


177 


181 


2,052 





236 killed = 11.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 869 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 44. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

j Thoroughfare Gap, Va 22 

( Manassas, Va 50 

Rappahannock, Va i 

Antietam, Md 29 

Fredericksburg, Va 17 

Gettysburg, Pa 13 

Wilderness, Va 30 

North Anna, Va 2 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

( Spotsylvania, Va.,May 8th 8 

< Spotsylvania, Va., May loth 13 

( Spotsylvania, Va., May 1 2th 2 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Weldon Railroad, Va 5 

Hatcher s Run, Va 12 

Gravelly Run, Va 10 

Five Forks, Va 7 



Cold Harbor, Va 9 

Present, also, at Cedar Mountain ; Chantilly ; South Mountain ; Chancellorsville ; Mine Run ; Totopoto- 
moy ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Originally a three months regiment which was organized in April, 1861, and was under fire July 2, 
1 86 1, at Falling Waters, Md. Reentering the service for three years, it was again mustered in at Harrisburg, Pa. 
It left there November 27, 1861, and proceeded to Annapolis with nine companies, numbering 813 officers and 
men ; the tenth company joined the command nine months later, on the eve of its first battle at Thoroughfare 
Gap, Va. In May, 1862, it joined McDowell s Corps, having been assigned to Hartsuffs (3d) Brigade, Rickett s 
(2d) Division, in which command it fought at Manassas ; it lost there 44 killed, 1 14 wounded, and 88 missing ; a 
total of 246, including the losses at Thoroughfare Gap and Rappahannock ; Lieutenant-Colonel Martin was 
among the killed. The whole brunt of the fight at Thoroughfare Gap fell on the Eleventh: Three weeks later 
the men were again hotly engaged at Antietam, where 124 more fell under the enemy s fire. The reenlisted men 
received their furlough in February, 1864, and went home, 276 in number, returning the next month with 314 
additional recruits. The regiment entered Grant : campaign as a part of Baxter s Brigade, Robinson s Division, 
Fifth Corps, in which command it was engaged at the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania, Major Keenan losing his 
life in the latter battle. While carrying the State flag of the Eleventh, three color bearers were killed, and 
eleven wounded. The service of this regiment was a long and active one, and its loss in battle was exceptionally 
large. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



TWENTY-SIXTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
CARR S BRIGADE HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM F. SMALL. 



(2) COL. BENJAMIN C. TILGHMAN ; Bvr. BRIO. OBH. 
(3) COL. ROBERT L. BODINK ; BVT. BKIO. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED ANI> DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIUSON. &<. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 



I 






I 

I 
2 
I 


I 

M 
13 

12 

5 
7 
J 7 

10 

3 

5 
16 


I 

5 

13 

12 

1 S 

17 

7 

II 
H 
17 
7 


I 





. 

* 





I 




I I 
2 

9 
5 
9 

7 
8 

9 

5 
6 


I 
1 I 
2 

9 

5 
9 

7 
8 

9 

5 

7 


2 I 

54 

43 
149 

57 
136 
148 
144 
169 

58 
144 




B 


C . 


D 


E . 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals 


6 


T 43 


M9 


2 


7i 


73 


i,5 2 3 





Total of killed and wounded, 489; captured and missing, 65 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 23. 



BATTLES. 

Yorktown, Va . . . 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Oak Grove, Va. . , 



K. &M.W. 
i 

7 

2 



Seven Days Battle, Va 2 

Manassas, Va 1 1 

Fredericksburg, Va 6 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Chancellorsville, Va 28 

Gettysburg, Pa 65 

Mine Run, Va 10 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 12 



Present, also, at Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Glendale ; Malvern Hill ; Chantilly ; Kelly s Ford ; 
North Anna ; Totopotomoy. 



NOTES. The Twenty-sixth was one of the first regiments that marched to the defence of the National Capital. 
In company with the Sixth Massachusetts, it was attacked by a mob while passing through Baltimore, on April 19, 
1861, in which affair the regiment lost one man killed and several wounded. The regiment was not mustered-in 
until May 5th, when it was sworn in for three years ; the enrollment, however, included very few of the original 
command who were at Baltimore, as they had tendered their services for a short term only. The Twenty-sixth 
encamped at Washington in May, 1861, and in October, having been assigned to Graver s Brigade, Hooker s 
Division, moved to Budd s Ferry, Md., where it was stationed until the spring campaign of 1862. At Chancel 
lorsville in Berry s Division it made a good fight, Colonel Tilghman being severely wounded, while the regi 
ment lost 1 1 killed, 71 wounded, and 9 missing. Its hardest fighting occurred at Gettysburg, where, out of 382 
engaged, it lost 30 killed, 176 wounded, and 7 missing; total, 213; two officers and three color bearers were 
killed there. In 1864 the regiment served in McAllister s Brigade, Mott s Division, Second Corps. It took part 
in Hancock s grand charge at Spotsylvania, and in the subsequent movements to the Pamunkey ; at the latter 
place it embarked for Washington, June 3, 1864, en route for home. It was mustered-out at Philadelphia, June 
1 8, 1864, the recruits and reenlisted men remaining in the field having been transferred to the Ninety-ninth 
Pennsylvania. 



264: 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
CANDY S BRIGADE GEARY S DIVISION TWELFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN W. GEAKY ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. (2) COL. GABRIEL DE KORFONAY. (3) COL. THOMAS J. AHL. 

(4) COL. HECTOR TYNDALE ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. (5) COL. JOHN FLYNN ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 
I 

I 
I 



I 
I 


I 
IO 

8 

15 

J 7 
1 1 

12 

J 3 
1 1 

IO 

14 

5 
4 

7 
6 

7 


2 
1 I 

9 
16 

7 

ii 

J 3 

14 
ii 

10 

M 

5 
4 

7 
6 

7 


I 








I 
I 


I 

6 

10 

18 
8 

5 

9 
8 

9 
8 

18 

8 

3 

2 
I 
10 


2 

6 

10 

18 
8 

5 

9 
8 

10 
8 
18 
8 

3 

3 

i 

10 


18 
198 

i85 

222 
231 
182 
2OI 
232 
205 
228 

2 39 

no 
no 
103 
no 

9 1 




B 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


N 


o 


p 




6 


5 1 


*57 


3 


I2 4 


127 


2,665 





Total of killed and wounded, 551. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

New Hope Church, Ga 3 

Pine Knob, Ga 15 

Gulp s Farm, Ga 2 

Kenesavv Mountain, Ga 2 

Marietta, Ga 2 

Peach Tree Creek, Ga 1 1 

Dalton, Ga i 

North Edisto, S. C i 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Linden, Va i 

Cedar Mountain, Va 2 

Antietam, Md 64 

Old Wilderness Tavern, Va i 

Chancellorsville, Va 25 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 

Wauhatchie, Tenn i 

Ringgold, Ga 13 

Rocky Face Ridge, Ga 7 

Present, also, at Manassas ; Lookout Mountain ; Resaca ; Siege of Atlanta ; Siege of Savannah. 

NOTES. Organized at Philadelphia in June, 1861. Leaving there on July 27th, it proceeded to 
Harper s Ferry, where it was attached to General Banks s command. It remained for a year in the 
vicinity of the Upper Potomac and Shenandoah Valley, during which time it was constantly engaged on important 
outpost duty, varied by occasional reconnoissances or sharp skirmishes. In 1862, it was assigned to the First 
Brigade of Greene s (2d) Division, and fought in that command at Antietam, where, under Major Pardee, it 
charged the enemy s position at the Dunker Church, and checked the Confederate advance. Its loss at Antietam 
was 44 killed, 217 wounded, and 5 missing; total, 266; Lieutenant-Colonel Tyndale, who commanded the 
brigade in that battle, was severely wounded. In October, 1862, companies L, M, N, O, and P, were transferred 
to the One Hundred and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania, and Major Pardee was promoted to the Colonelcy of that 
regiment. At Chancellorsville, the Twenty-eighth was commanded by Major L. F. Chapman, an intrepid and 
skilful officer, who lost his life there. The regimental loss at Chancellorsville was 17 killed, 60 wounded, and 24 
missing; total, 101. The Twenty-eighth was afterwards transferred to the Western Army, in which it fought at 
Lookout Mountain, and in the long and bloody Atlanta campaign. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING KEGIMENTS. 



2G5 



FORTY-FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BLISS S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION - - NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. THOMAS WELSH; RHIU.CEN. 



(2) COL. JOHN I. CURTIN ; BVT. BRIO. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


Kii.i.Kii AND DIKO or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON. Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment, 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


( >flicers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Stall 


I 
I 



I 
2 
I 
2 



I 

3 
i 


I 
2O 

T 9 

21 

4 
33 
3 

! 9 
29 

18 

> 7 


2 
21 

9 

22 

16 
34 
5 
19 
3 

21 

28 

















21 
22 

2 5 
24 
2 5 
27 
2 5 
3 
2 3 
3 




2 I 
22 

2 5 
24 
25 
2? 
2 5 

3 
23 
3 


9 

197 

205 

195 

83 
1 88 
216 
185 
199 
1 86 
187 




B 


c 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H. 


T , 


K 


Totals 


!3 


214 


227 





252 


252 


1,960 





227 killed ii. 5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 873 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 98. 



BATTLM. K. &M.W. 

Otter Island, S. C 4 

James Island, S. C i 

South Mountain, Md 43 

Antietam, Md 6 

Jackson, Miss 4 

Blue Springs, Tenn 4 

Campbell s Station, Tenn 2 

Knoxville, Tenn i 

Wilderness, Va 34 

Spotsylvania, Va 13 



K.&M. w. 
. . . . i 
. . . . i 

. . . 41 



BATTLEH. 

North Anna, Va < 

Bethesda Church, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va. (assault) 

Cold Harbor, Va. (trenches) 4 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 20 

Picket, Petersburg, July, 1864 5 

Picket, Cold Harbor, June, 1864 i 

Mine Explosion, Va 14 

Peeble s Farm, Va 17 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 1 1 



Present, also, at Fredericksburg ; Vicksburg, Miss. ; Ny River, Va. : Weldon Railroad ; Hatcher s Run. 

NOTES. Organized at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, Pa., on October 21, 1861, the men having been enlisted 
mostly in Tioga, Centre, and I^ancaster Counties. It embarked at Baltimore, November i9th, for Fort Monroe, 
and after remaining there a month re-embarked for Hilton Head, S. C. It returned to Virginia in August, 1862, 
having been assigned to Willcox s (ist) Division, Ninth Corps; Colonel Welsh was placed in command of the 
brigade. At South Mountain the Forty-fifth drove the Confederates from a strong position, but their gallantry 
cost them a loss of 27 killed and 107 wounded. In the spring of 1863, the Ninth Corps was transferred to the 
Western Army ; it subsequently took part in the operations about Vicksburg, and then in the fighting with Long- 
street s Corps at the Siege of Knoxville, Tenn. In January, 1864, 426 of the men reenlisted for the war, thus 
ensuring a continuance of the regimental organization. The Ninth Corps having returned to Virginia in 1864, 
the regiment participated in Grant s campaigns and was hotly engaged at the Wilderness, where it lost 1 7 killed, 
1 19 wounded, and 7 missing ; and at Cold Harbor, where 181, or over half the regiment were killed or wounded, 
Major Kelsey being among the killed. The Forty-fifth took part in all the hard fighting at Petersburg, Colonel 
Curtin falling severely wounded in the assault of June 18. In the fighting at the crater of the exploded Mine, it 
captured the flag of the Sixth Virginia. The regiment was mustered out July 17, 1865. 



266 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FORTY-SIXTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
KNIFE S BRIGADE WILLIAMS S DIVISION TWELFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOSEPH F. KNIFE ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



(2) COL. JAMES L. SELFRIDGE ; BVT. BRIO. GEX. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 



I 

2 

3 
i 

i 



i 

2 




13 

16 

17 

20 

16 
16 
20 

15 
ii 

21 


2 
M 

16 
18 

22 

*9 
17 

21 

15 
12 

23 


I 








I 








13 

IS 

16 
ii 

10 

12 

18 

16 

12 

J 3 


I 
13 
15 

16 

1 1 
10 

12 

*9 
16 

12 
13 


18 

170 
186 
187 
164 
172 
191 
189 
176 

165 

176 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E . 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals 


M 


I6 5 


I 79 


2 


136 


*38 


r >794 





179 killed = 10 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 622. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Skirmish, April 26, 1862 i 

Winchester, Va 12 

Cedar Mountain, Va 55 

Antietam, Md 7 

Chancellorsville, Va 7 

Gettysburg, Pa 2 

Decherd, Tenn. (Guerillas) 2 

Fayetteville, Tenn. (Guerillas) T 

Resaca, Ga 9 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Pine Mountain, Ga 4 

Lost Mountain, Ga i 

Gulp s Farm, Ga 8 

Kenesaw Mountain, Ga i 

Peach Tree Creek, Ga 51 

Siege of Atlanta 4 

Montieth Swamp, Ga 2 

Averasboro, N. C i 

Bentonville, N.C 2 



New Hope Church, Ga 9 

Present, also, at Kernstown, Va. ; Manassas, Va. ; Cassville, Ga. ; Savannah, Ga. 

NOTES. Organized in September, 1861, at Harrisburg, Pa., the regiment was ordered, soon after, to Har 
per s Ferry, where it was assigned to Crawford s Brigade, Williams s Division, Banks s Corps, subsequently the 
Twelfth Corps. It remained in the vicinity of the Upper Potomac until the early part of 1862, when it moved 
with Banks up the Shenandoah Valley. Stonewall Jackson s presence there made an active campaign in 
which the Forty-sixth took a prominent part. At Cedar Mountain, Banks gave battle with his little army, 
and a bloody contest ensued. The Forty-sixth entered that engagement with 23 officers and 481 men; it lost 
there 31 killed, 102 wounded, and 1 1 1 missing or captured ; eleven officers were killed or wounded. The regi 
ment was in line with the Twelfth Corps at Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, after which the Corps was 
ordered to Tennessee. Having reenlisted for the war it was granted a thirty days furlough in January, 1864, 
after which it returned with its ranks well recruited. The Corps number was changed to the Twentieth and the 
command given to General Hooker. The regiment shared in all of Sherman s hard fighting in his advance on 
Atlanta, during which occurred the battle of Peach Tree Creek, Ga., in which it withstood a desperate attack ; 
five of the officers lost their lives in this affair. The Forty-sixth marched through Georgia and the Carolinas with 
Sherman ; thence through Virginia, over its old battle grounds, to Washington where it took part in the Grand 
Review at the close of the war. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTLVJ REGIMENTS. 



2G7 



FORTY-EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BLISS S BRIGADE POTTER S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES NAGLE ; BRIG. GBN. 

(2) COL. JOSHUA K. SIEGFRIED; BVT. BRIO. GK. 



(3) COL. OEOROK W. OOWAN (Ktllod). 

(4) COL. ISAAC F. BRANNON. 



C OMPANIEH. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I HISON, AT. 


Total 
Enrollment 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



I 



I 



2 
2 
2 
I 


I 

3 
16 
1 1 
1 1 

9 
i9 

M 

18 

9 
4 


3 
3 

7 
1 1 

1 1 
20 

*9 

16 

20 
21 

15 


I 





I 



* 


I 




5 
M 
17 
I? 

12 

9 
I I 

16 
I I 
10 


I 

S 

M 

17 
1 8 

12 

9 
1 1 

16 

I 2 
10 


21 

199 
198 
189 
198 
1 80 
187 
181 
194 
169 

t73 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 




I I 


55 


1 66 


3 


142 


45 


1,889 





Total of killed and wounded, 529 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 28. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Manassas, Va 20 

South Mountain, Va i 

Antietam, Md 14 

Fredericksburg, Va 1 1 

Campbell s Station, Va i 

Knoxville, Term 4 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 27 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 5 

Cold Harbor, Va 1 6 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 19 

Picket, Va., June 23,1 864 2 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 19 

Peebles s Farm, Va 5 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 15 



Present, also, at New Berne, N. C. ; Chantilly, Va. ; Blue Springs, Tenn. ; Mine Explosion, Va. ; Weldon 
Railroad, Va. ; Hatcher s Run, Va. 



NOTES. Recruited in the mining regions of Schuylkill County. Leaving the State, September 24, r86i, it 
proceeded to Fort Monroe, where it remained encamped until November nth, when it sailed for Hatteras Island, 
N.C. It served in Burnside s Department, and in April, 1862, was assigned to Nagle s Brigade, Reno s Division, 
in which command it fought at Manassas. The regiment followed the various fortunes of the Ninth Corps in all 
its wanderings ; fought well at Antietam and Fredericksburg ; then shared the hardships of the campaign in West 
Tennessee; and, in 1864, having reenlisted for the war, rejoined the Army of the Potomac. At Antietam the 
regiment lost 8 killed, 5 1 wounded, and i missing ; and at Spotsylvania, i 7 killed and 86 wounded. Though an 
efficient regiment in battle, the Forty-eighth became famous by reason of its connection with the Mine at Peters 
burg. This mine was excavated entirely by the men of the Forty-eighth under the supervision of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Pleasants, who conceived the idea, planned and carried it out. The main gangway was over 500 feet 
long ; 8,000 pounds of powder were successfully exploded, forming a crater 250 feet long, and 25 feet deep. 
Colonel Pleasants and his men received a special acknowledgment of their services in General Orders, No. 32. 
The regiment fought its last battle April 2, 1865, at the Fall of Petersburg, in which Colonel Gowan was killed. 
He entered the service, as a Lieutenant, serving with honor in every campaign, only to meet his fate in the final 
battle. 



268 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FORTY-NINTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
RUSSELL S BRIGADE WRIGHT S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM H. IRWIN ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. (2) COL. THOMAS M. RULINGS, B. 3. (Killed). (3) COL. BOYNTON J. HICKMAN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 

I 

2 

* 

2 
2 


I 

16 

20 

J 3 
T 9 

21 

18 

29 

2 3 

2 3 
i 


3 

1? 

22 

13 

X 9 

21 

18 
29 

2 5 

25 
i 







* 




I 
16 
2O 

IS 

16 

21 

21 

16 
16 

M 

I 2 


I 

16 

2O 
IS 

16 

21 

21 

1 6 

16 
M 

12 


1 9 

148 

164 

138 
147 

155 
156 
132 
126 

128 

* 




B 


c 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


T . 


K. 


Totals 


9 


184 


193 





168 


168 


1,313 





193 killed = 14.6 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 736; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 24. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 09 

Hanovertown, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 10 

Opequon, Va 1 8 

Petersburg, Va 6 

Sailor s Creek, Va 18 

Picket, Va., June 16, 1862 i 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Yorktown, Va i 

Williamsburg, Va i 

Garnett s Hill, Va 3 

Golding s Farm, Va 4 

Antietam, Md i 

Marye s Heights, Va 3 

Rappahannock Station, Va 5 

Wilderness, Va 12 

Present, also, at Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Malvern Hill ; Crampton s Gap ; Fredericksburg (1862) ; 
Salem Church ; Gettysburg ; Mine Run ; Fort Stevens, B.C.; Hatcher s Run. 

NOTES. Recruited in Mifflin, Centre, Chester, Huntingdon, and Juniata Counties. It arrived at Washing 
ton September 22d, 1861, where it was assigned to Hancock s Brigade of Wm. F. Smith s Division, a brigade 
composed of exceptionally good regiments. Under its able general the brigade soon won distinction at Williams- 
burg, where, by its brilliant and effective manoeuvres, it aided materially in securing a victory ; that it accom 
plished the same with but little loss, reflected all the more credit on its " superb " commander. In the spring of 
1863 the Forty-ninth was transferred to the Third Brigade, First (Brooks s) Division, Sixth Corps, in which 
command it remained during the rest of the war. The brigade Sixth Maine, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, One 
Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsylvania, and Fifth Wisconsin distinguished itself particularly at Rappahannock 
Station, carrying the enemy s works by a bayonet charge in which some of the regiments lost heavily. However 
fortunate the Forty-ninth may have been in previous battles, it was destined to suffer a terrible loss at Spotsyl 
vania. In that battle it was one of the twelve selected regiments which formed the assaulting column under the 
gallant Upton. In that charge, 260 of its men were cut down by the enemy s fire, and Colonel Hidings and 
Lieutenant-Colonel John B. Miles were killed. Two days later the regiment was engaged in the bloody contest 
at the "Angle " with still further loss. From May 6th to May i3th, 1864 including the Wilderness and Spot 
sylvania this regiment lost 317, in killed or wounded, out of the 530 who crossed the Rapidan. 

"Consolidated with Company B, January, 1863. 



TllltKK HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



liG J 



FIFTIETH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
CHRIST S BRIGADE WILLCOX S DIVISION --NINTH CORPS. 



(l)CoL. BENJAMIN C. CHRIST; BVT. BRIO. GEN. 



WOOL. WILLIAM II. TELFOHD. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED op WOUNDS. 


DIKD or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Knrollaient. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 




I 
I 
I 




2 



2 


* * 

21 

8 

25 
18 

9 
M 

I 2 
12 
I I 

16 


I 

21 

8 

26 
19 

20 

14 

12 

4 
I I 

18 





I 



* 

2 

I 








21 

3 

12 

3 2 
23 

5 
17 
16 

14 
7 




21 

14 
12 

3 2 
2 3 
17 

18 
16 
M 
17 


I? 
203 
l6 4 
177 

215 

181 
182 
189 
176 
164 

221 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


156 


164 


4 


% 

180 


184 


1,889 





K.&M.W. 

Wilderness, Va 20 

Spotsylvania, Va 41 

North Anna, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 8 

Petersburg, Va. June 1 7, 1864 16 

Petersburg Mine, Va 3 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 12 

Weldon Railroad, Va 9 

Peeble s Farm, Va 2 



Total of killed and wounded, 594 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 76. 
BATTLKS. K.&M.W. BATI 

Pocotaligo, S. C 4 

Picket, S. C., 1862 i 

Manassas, Va 16 

Chantilly, Va 1 1 

South Mountain, Md i 

Antietam, Md 12 

Jackson, Miss i 

Blue Springs, Tenn i 

Campbell s Station, Tenn 2 

Knoxville, Tenn 3 

Present, also, at Coosa River, S. C. ; Fredericksburg ; Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. ; Hatcher s Run ; Fort 
Stedman. 

NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, Pa., in September, 1861, having been recruited in the central part of the 
State. Proceeding to Annapolis it was brigaded with General Stevens s command, and in October sailed with 
General Sherman s (T. W.) expedition to Hilton Head, S. C. The regiment remained in this department sev 
eral months, during which time it had a varied experience in campaigning and fighting ; at Pocotaligo, Captain 
Charles H. Parker was killed while bravely leading a forlorn hope across the string pieces of an abandoned 
bridge. In July, 1862, the Fiftieth joined the Ninth Corps at Fort Monroe, then on its way to reinforce Pope. 
It was actively engaged in the battles of Manassas and Chantilly, in which the regiment lost 19 killed, 119 
wounded, and 15 missing ; total, 153. After more hard fighting, at Antietam, it was transferred with the Corps to 
the West, where it participated in the Siege of Vicksburg, it being then in Potter s (2d) Division. In the fighting 
before Jackson, Miss., the regiment lost its Lieutenant-Colonel, Thomas S. Brenholz, who was mortally wounded 
there. The Fiftieth shared the privations and dangers of the campaign at Knoxville, Tenn., and then returned 
to Virginia in the spring of 1864, it having rei-nlisted in the meanwhile and received its veteran furlough. It 
fought under Grant from the Rapidan to Appomattox, and was mustered out July 30, 1865. Its casualties at 
Spotsylvania were 23 killed, 109 wounded, and 1 13 captured or missing. At the dedication of the Gettysburg 
monument, July 4, 1865, the Fiftieth was present by order of the War Department as a representative of the army. 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
HARTRANFT S BRIGADE WILLCOX S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



U) COL. JOHN F. HARTKANFT ; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. 



(2) COL. WILLIAM J. BOLTON ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 
I 

2 
2 

I 



I 
I 
I 




25 
IO 

18 

J 5 
1 1 

17 
T 9 
i7 
M 
19 


2 
26 
II 
20 

17 
II 

18 

J 9 

18 

15 
20 





* 

* 
* 








20 

6 

17 
17 

8 

9 
17 
H 
IS 
14 




2O 

6 

17 

17 

8 

9 
i? 
M 
15 
M 


18 
228 

174 
191 

206 
181 

201 

228 

235 
I8 7 

196 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Toials . 


12 


165 


177 





T 37 


J 37 


2,045 





Total of killed and wounded, 647 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 41. 



BATTLES. K. &M. W. 

New Berne, N. C i 

Camden, N.C 4 

JVIanassas, Va _j_ 

Antietam, Md 8 

South Mountain, Md ^32 



Fredericksburg, Va 23 

Milldale, Miss i 

Knoxville, Tenn i 

Wilderness, Va 17 



BATTLES. K. &M. W. 

North Anna, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864 17 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 14 

Petersburg Mine, Va 6 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 15 

Weldon Railroad, Va 8 

Boydton Road, Va T 

Fort Stedman, Va i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 



Spotsylvania, Va 23 

Present, also, at Roanoke Island, N. C. ; Chantilly, Va. ; Vicksburg, Miss. ; Campbell s Station, Tenn. ; 
Reams s Station, Va. ; Peebles s Farm, Va ; Hatcher s Run, Va. 

NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, November 7, 1861. In January, 1862, it sailed from Annapolis with 
Burnside s Expedition to North Carolina, having been assigned to Reno s Brigade. It returned to Virginia 
with the Ninth Corps in August, 1862, and was engaged at the battles of Manassas ; it was then in Ferrero s 
Brigade of Reno s Division. The Fifty-first achieved historic prominence at Antietam by its famous charge 
across the stone bridge which spans the Antietam Creek. The enemy s rifle pits and batteries commanded 
the approaches to this bridge ; after repeated attempts by other troops, Colonel Hartranft led his regiment 
across the narrow roadway of the span, and gained a position on the opposite bank. In this daring affair 
the regiment was ably supported by the Fifty-first New York under Colonel Robert B. Potter. The casual 
ties of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania at the bridge, and in the subsequent fighting of that day, amounted to 21 
killed, and 99 wounded, Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas S. Bell being among the killed. The regiment afterwards 
fought with the Ninth Corps in Mississippi and Tennessee. It reonlisted, went home on furlough, was fully re 
cruited, and then served under Grant in the Virginia campaigns. At Cold Harbor it took part in an advance 
against the enemy s lines in which Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin Schall, who was in command, was killed while 
leading his men. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING KIJ.IMKNTS. 



271 



FIFTY-THIRD PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 



BROOKE S BRIGADE BARLOW S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 

(1) COL. JOHN R. BKOOKE ; BVT. MAJOK-GEN. (2) COL. OCTAVIUS 8. BULL. 

(3) COL. WILLIAM R. MINTZER; BVT. BRIO. EN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AXU DIEU OK WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIUSON, Jtc. 


TuUil 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

* 



i 



i 





i 
i 




25 
14 

15 

27 

10 

19 

2 5 
21 

21 
IS 


1 

25 
M 

15 
28 

10 
20 

25 
21 

22 

9 









I 








21 
9 

18 

19 

8 

21 
23 

1 9 

18 

27 




21 
9 

18 

*9 

8 

21 

24 

*9 

1 8 

2 7 


1 8 
207 

J 74 
178 

2IO 
I6 3 
206 
246 
209 
211 
I 7 I 


Company A 


B 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G . 


H 


I , 


K 


Totals 


5 


195 


200 


I 


93 


194 


i993 





200 killed = 10 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 787; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 56. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Fair Oaks, Va 22 

Seven Days Battle, Va 3 

Antietam, Md 

Fredericksburg, Va 39 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 1 1 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 2 

Spotsylvania, Va 41 



BATTLES. K. A M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 16 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 18 

Petersburg Trenches, Y;i 9 

Deep Bottom, Va .\ 

Ream s Station, Va i 

Picket, Va., Oct. 18, 1864 i 

White Oak Road, Va 20 

Farmville, Va 2 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Gaines s Mill ; Peach Orchard ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Malveni 
Hill ; Mine Run ; Po River , North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruiting commenced in September, 1861, the companies being raised in various counties. An 
organization was effected at Harrisburg, November 5, 1861, after which the regiment proceeded immediately to 
Washington. It wintered in Virginia, near Alexandria, and then went with General McClellan to the Peninsula, 
having been assigned to French s (3d) Brigade, Richardson s (ist) Division, Second Corps, remaining in that 
famous division throughout its service. Its first experience in battle was at Fair Oaks ; Major Thomas Yeager 
was killed there, the total loss of the regiment amounting to 13 killed, 64 wounded, and 17 missing. General 
Richardson was killed at Antietam, and Geneial Hancock succeeded to the command of the division. General 
Zook commanded the brigade at Fredericksburg, where, in that bloody assault, the Fifty-third lost 21 killed, 133 
wounded, and i missing, out of the 283 men who were in line that day. In December, 1863, the regiment 
rei ; nlisted for the war, and so was present at all the battles of the Second Corps. It participated, with severe loss, 
in Hancock s charge at Spotsylvania, in the assaults at Cold Harbor and Petersburg, and was actively engaged in 
the battle near Hatcher s Run, on March/3 1, l86 5> an engagement known as White Oak Road, or Boydton Road. 
Its losses at Spotsylvania were 26 killed, 123 wounded, and 28 missing ; total, 1 77. The regiment was mustered 
out June 30, 1865. 



2T2 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTY-FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
WHITE S BRIGADE AMES S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



COL. RICHARD WHITE. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men, 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 






I 
I 

2 




2 
I 



22 
22 

15 

15 

18 

18 

22 

15 

28 

26 




22 
22 

*5 

16 

19 

20 

22 
J S 

3 

27 


I 



I 






I 


* 



I 

37 
3 

3 1 
28 

22 

25 
21 

3 

20 
2 3 


2 

37 
3 1 

3 1 

28 

22 

25 
22 

3 

20 
2 3 


J 9 

T 95 
179 

158 
166 
168 
170 

75 
163 

167 
198 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


7 


2OI 


208 


3 


268 


271 


i,758 





208 killed = II. 8 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 782 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 96. 



BATTLES. 

Edisto Island, S. C 

Pocotaligo, S. C 6 

Swift Creek, Va 6 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 58 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 10 

Cold Harbor, Va 41 

Picket, S. C., March 29,1862 i 

Present, also, at Appomattox. 



K. & M.W. BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

2 Petersburg, Va. (assault, June 15, 1864) 46 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 12 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 15 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 30, 1865 6 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 

Rice s Station, Va i 

Place unknown 2 



NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, Pa. Leaving the State November 22, 1 86 1, it went to Fort Monroe ; 
thence, after a short stay, it proceeded to Hilton Head, S. C., and in February, 1862, was ordered to Edisto 
Island. The regiment was engaged in the battle of Pocotaligo, October 22, 1862, after which it was stationed 
for fourteen months at Beaufort, S. C. It reenlisted in January, 1864, and went home on a veteran furlough, 
returning in March with enough recruits to fill the ranks to the maximum. It embarked in the following month 
for Virginia, where it joined Butler s Army and was placed in the Third Brigade, Ames s Division, Tenth Corps, 
Colonel White being assigned to the command of the brigade. At Drewry s Bluff the division was attacked by 
Beauregard s forces, which advanced in the morning under the concealment of a thick fog ; the regiment, occu 
pying an exposed position, received the full force of the attack, losing over 300 men killed, wounded, and cap 
tured ; Colonel White and 164 men were taken prisoners. At Cold Harbor the Fifty-fifth fought in Stannard s 
Brigade, Martindale s Division, Eighteenth Corps, sustaining a loss of 12 killed, no wounded, and 29 missing. In 
the assault on Petersburg, June 15, 1864, the regiment lost 24 killed, 124 wounded, and 8 missing; total, 156. 
In December, 1864, the Eighteenth Corps was discontinued, upon which the regiment was assigned to Fairchild s 
(4th) Brigade, Foster s (ist) Division, Twenty- fourth Corps, in which command it took part in the closing bat 
tles of the war. The Fifty-fifth lost 750 men, killed or wounded, during the eleven months preceding Lee s 
surrender. 



THKEE HUNDRED FIUHTINU REGIMENTS. 



273 



FIFTY-SEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
GRAHAM S BRIGADE BIKNEY S DIVISION -- THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL WILLIAM MAXWELL. 

(_) COL.CIIAKLKS T. CAMPBELL ; BKI. GEN. 



(3) COL. PETER SIDES. 

(4) COL. GKOKUK ZINN ; BVT. BRIO. GKN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED op DISEASE. ACCIDENT*, L\ PIHSON. Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field atul Staff 


2 
I 

t 

3 

i 

t 

v> 

1 


I 

7 
16 

20 

13 
M 
5 
4 

3 

ii 
S 


3 
18 

16 

20 

14 
17 

J 5 
14 
14 
M 
16 


. 
. 
. 

. 










20 
26 
24 
2 5 
17 

I( ; 
19 

16 

26 

2 5 




2O 
26 
24 
2 5 
7 
19 
19 

1 6 

26 

2 5 


18 

2IO 
I 7 2 
166 
166 

14_> 

45 
124 

34 

5 2 
162 


Comnanv A . 


B 


C . 


I). 


E . 


F . 


G. 


H. 


I 


K 


Totals 


12 


149 


161 . 217 


217 


1,59 





BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Wilderness, Va 38 

Spotsylvania, Va 8 

North Anna, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 8 

Peeble s Farm, Va i 

Boydton Road, Va 2 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 i 



161 killed 10.1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 593 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 50. 

BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Yorktown, Va i 

Fair Oaks, Va 1 6 

Glendale, Va 13 

Malvern Hill, Va 2 

Manassas, Va i 

Fredericksbtirg. Va 28 

Chancellorsville, Va 20 

Gettysburg, Pa 18 

Mine Run, Va i 

Present, also, at Williamsburg ; Chantilly ; Kelly s Ford ; Po River ; Totopotomoy ; Strawberry Plains ; 
Deep Bottom ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, Pa., having been recruited mostly in the western part of the State. It 
arrived at Washington in December, 1 86 1, where it remained a couple of months, and then marched into Virginia, 
encamping near Alexandria. With the Army of the Potomac, it took the field early in 1862, under General 
McClellan, and was actively engaged in the siege operations at Yorktown. It was then in Jameson s Brigade, 
Kearny s Division, Third Corps, At Fair Oaks it lost 1 1 killed, 48 wounded, and i missing, Major Culp being 
among the killed. At Fredericksburg, out of 3*16 present, there was a loss of 18 killed, 80 wounded, and 52 
missing, many of the latter being killed or wounded. In that battle the brigade was commanded by General J. 
H. Ward. At Chancellorsville the loss was 10 killed, 43 wounded, and 18 missing; at Gettysburg, 1 1 killed, 46 
wounded, and 58 missing ; at the Wilderness, 22 killed, 128 wounded, and 3 missing. These were the casualties 
as officially reported. Upon the discontinuance of the Third Corps the regiment became a part of Alex. Hays s 
Brigade, Birney s (3d) Division, Second Corps. The hard fighting at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania reduced 
the ranks so that it was consolidated into a battalion of six companies. In January, 1865, it received an acces 
sion of four companies from the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania, which had also been consolidated previous to the 
transfer. Lieutenant-Colonel Zinn of the Eighty-fourth was made Colonel of the Fifty-seventh. The regiment 

was mustered out June 29, 1865. 
18 



274 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
NEIL S BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. OLIVER H. RIPPEY (Killed). 
(3) COL. GEORGE C. SPEAR (Killed). 



(3) COL. GEORGE F. SMITH. 

(4) COL. ROBERT L. ORR. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Fiplrl and Staff. . 


4 

3 

4 

3 
i 

2 





I 
I 


I 

3 2 

22 

22 
24 

23 

23 
20 

22 
14 
15 


5 

35 
26 

2 5 
2 5 
25 
23 

20 

22 

15 

16 





I 


* 








I 

IO 
10 

13 
13 

12 
IO 

8 
8 

7 
8 


I 
IO 
1 1 

13 

J 3 

12 
IO 

8 
8 

7 
8 


16 
203 
194 
204 
181 
209 
206 
191 
202 
1 80 

2OI 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


19 


218 


2 37 


I 


IOO 


IOI 


1,987 





237 killed = 11.9 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 872 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 19, 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Fair Oaks, Va 92 

Malvern Hill, Va 4 

Antietam, Md i 

Williamsport, Md 2 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1862) 2 

Marye s Heights, Va 15 

Wilderness, Va., 34 

Spotsylvania, Va 44 



K. & M.W. 

6 



BATTLES. 

Fort Stevens, D. C 

Charlestown, W. Va 8 

Opequon, Va 3 

Fisher s Hill, Va 2 

Cedar Creek, Va 6 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 4 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 10 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 2 



Cold Harbor, Va 2 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Salem Heights ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock Station ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. There were more officers killed in the Sixty-first Pennsylvania than in any other regiment in the 
entire Union Army. Colonel Rippey and four line officers were killed at Fair Oaks ; Colonel Spear and a Lieu 
tenant fell dead at the storming of Marye s Heights ; Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Crosby was killed in the final 
and victorious assault of the Sixth Corps at Petersburg ; the adjutant and four other officers lost their lives at the 
Wilderness and Spotsylvania ; another fell at Malvern Hill ; another at Fort Stevens ; two at Cedar Creek, and 
two-at Charlestown in the Shenandoah. With such officers to lead there was a consequent heavy loss among 
their men. At Fair Oaks the Sixty-first suffered the most of any regiment in that battle, its casualties amounting 
to 68 killed, 152 wounded, and 43 missing; a total of 263, but not without exacting from the enemy an equiva 
lent of loss, the official reports making mention of the large number of the enemy s dead which lay in front of 
the position occupied by the Sixty-first. While on the Peninsula it was in Abercrombie s Brigade, of Couch s 
Division, Fourth Corps. At Marye s Heights it formed part of the famous " Light Division " of the Sixth Corps, 
and through the Wilderness and Shenandoah campaigns it fought in Neil s (3d) Brigade, Getty s (2d) Division, 
Sixth Corps. Its losses at the Wilderness were 20 killed, 113 wounded, and 18 missing; at Spotsylvania, 31 
killed, 102 wounded, and 6 missing. It was organized at Pittsburg in August, 1861, reenlisted in 1864, and was 
mustered out June 28, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIUHTINC; RECJIMENTS. 



SIXTY-SECOND PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
SWEITZER S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION-- FIFTH CORPS, 



(1) COL. SAMUEL W. BLACK (Killed). 



(2) COL. JACOB B. SWE1TZEH : BVT. 



COMPANIES. 


KM 1 1 n ANII DlKIl OF WorXDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I IUSON, Ac. 


Totjil 
Enrollment. 


Officers. M-n. Total. 


Officers. 


M, 


Total. 


Field anil Staff 


5 
i 


I 
2 



2 
2 
I 
I 



2 




10 

9 
10 

8 
M 

20 

9 
16 

10 

9 
1 8 

9 


5 
1 1 

9 
1 1 

10 

4 
20 

21 

18 
1 1 
10 
18 
1 1 









* 









6 
8 

8 
8 

3 

2 

6 
9 

8 
10 

5 
6 




6 
8 

8 
8 

3 

2 

6 

9 
8 

10 

5 
6 


7 

I0 5 
1 06 

I I 2 

3 

58 
142 

161 

35 
114 

148 
118 

I2 5 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F . 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


Totals 


J 7 


5 2 


169 





89 


89 


*>57 l 





169 killed = 10.7 per cent. 
Total of killed ami wounded, 633 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 8. 

K. & M. W. 



BATTLES. K.&M. W. 

Wilderness, Va 14 

Spotsylvania, Va 30 

North Anna, Va i 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 9 

Petersburg, Va 2 

Gunboat service i 

Manassas ; Antietam ; Shepherdstown ; Rappahannock 



BATTLES. 

Yorktown, Va i 

Gaines s Mill, Va 27 

Malvern Hill, Va 21 

Harrison s Landing, Va i 

Fredericksburg, Va 13 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 45 

Present, also, at Hanover C. H. ; Seven Days; 
Station ; Mine Run. 

NOTES. Recruited in July, 1861, six companies coming from Allegheny County, the others from the west 
ern part of the State. The regiment encamped in Virginia in September, 1861, and after six months of drill, 
discipline, and field duty, confronted the enemy at the Siege of Yorktown. After the fall of Yorktown in May, 
1862 it moved up the Peninsula, then in Griffin s Brigade, Morell s Division, Fifth Corps, in which command 
it fought at Gaines s Mill. Colonel Black was killed in that battle, the regiment losing 15 killed, 73 wounded, 
and 76 missing. It was engaged, four days later, at Malvern Hill, where its colors were cut down five times, but 
were borne from the field flying. At Gettysburg the division was commanded by General Barnes ; it fought there 
in the historic wheat field, the Sixty-second losing in that battle 28 killed, 107 wounded, and 40 missing ; Major 
William G. Long and five line officers were killed there. The winter of 1863-4 was passed quietly in winter 
quarters; then, in May, 1864, with 557 men, the regiment entered upon the bloody campaign which occurred 
between May 6th and June i8th of that year. In the hard fighting about Spotsylvania it lost 14 killed (includ 
ing Lieutenant- Colonel James C. Hall, who was in command), 112 wounded, and 18 missing; total, 144. The 
Sixty-second, during its active sen-ice, was always in the Second Brigade, First Division, Fifth Corps, Colonel 
Sweitzer commanding the brigade during the most of the time. The regiment was mustered out July 13, 1864, 
its term of service having expired. 



276 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTY-THIED PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
GRAHAM S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL. ALEX. RAYS, OT. $., &. 3.; BVT. MAJOR-GEN. (Killed). 

(2) COL. A. S. MORGAN. 



(3) COL. WILLIAM S. KIRK WOOD (Killed). 

(4) COL. JOHN A. BANKS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 

I 

2 



I 

I 

2 
2 

3 
i 


* 

2 3 
1 1 

JO 

*5 
M 
IS 

2 5 

22 
2O 
14 


4 
24 
3 

IO 

16 

*5 
J 7 

2 7 
25 

20 
15 


* 










i 




] 3 

10 

1 1 

10 

1 1 

J 9 

1 1 

IO 

1 1 

27 


!3 
IO 

1 1 

10 

1 1 

>9 
ii 

IO 

1 1 

j8 


*7 

5 1 
103 

136 

58 
146 

112 

141 

*39 
132 

106 




B 


C. 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


*7 


169 


1 86 


i 


J 33 


*34 


!34i 





BATTLES. 



186 killed = 13.8 per cent. 

* 

Total killed and wounded, 721 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 27. 

K. & M.W. BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



Skirmish, Va., Nov., 1861 i 

Pohick Church, Va 4 

Yorktown, Va 3 

Fair Oaks, Va 37 

Skirmish, Va., June 21, 1862 i 

Oak Grove, Va 3 

Glendale, Va 14 

Manassas, Va 25 

Fredericksburg, Va 3 

Chancellorsville, Va 17 

Present, also, at Seven Days ; Chantilly ; Totopotomoy. 



Gettysburg, Pa 3 

Auburn Mills, Va i 

Kelly s Ford, Va 2 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 48 

Spotsylvania, Va 5 

North Anna, Va 4 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Petersburg, Va 13 



NOTES. Seven companies were recruited in Pittsburg, or in its vicinity ; the others were from the western 
counties. The regiment was organized in August, 1861, joining the army in October of the same year, where it 
was assigned to Heintzelman s Division. It performed outpost duty in Virginia for several months, during which 
an affair occurred on the picket line in which Captain Chapman and Quartermaster Lysle were killed. When 
the Third Corps moved to the Peninsula the Sixty-third went there with its brigade (Jameson s), and took part 
in some of the hardest fighting in that campaign. At Fair Oaks, with only eight companies in line, it held its 
position steadily in the face of a musketry fire which cut down over a hundred men ; 23 were killed, 79 wounded, 
and 20 missing. At Manassas, Colonel Hays was severely wounded, the regiment losing 15 killed, 94 wounded, 
and 1 1 missing. It was hotly engaged again, at Chancellorsville, where it lost many of its most valued officers. 
In that battle, Colonel Kirkwood, Adjutant McGranahan, and four line officers were killed. After the discontinu 
ance of the Third Corps, with its gallant organization, the regiment was placed in Hays s Brigade, Birney s 
Division, Second Corps. General Hays was killed at the Wilderness, and in the same battle the Sixty-third lost 
191 of its number killed or wounded, out of 485 in line. Its term of service expired September 9, 1864. The 
recruits and reiJnlisted men remaining in the field were transferred to the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania, while the 
others, few in number, returned to their homes. 



TllKKK Ilr.NDHKl) Fl<JHTl.\<J 1IKMM KNTS. 



277 



SIXTY-NINTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 

1 im.AHKi.i iiiA r.i;i(,\Di: -GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOSHUA T. OWEN . BHICJ. . JEN. 



COL. DENNIS O KANE (Killed). 



(8) COL. WILLIAM DAVIS. 



COMPANIES. 



Field and Staff. 

Company A . . . 

B... 

c... 

D... 
E... 
F... 

G... 
H... 
I ... 
K... 



Totals , 



Kll 1 1 l> AM) DlKI> <>r \\ MI MI-. 


DIED or DISKASK, ACTIUKNTS, Ix PIUHON, Ac. 


Total 


< fflcTS. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Enrollment. 


T 

>> 


I 


4 











17 


I 


U 


4 





7 


7 


21 I 





7 


i? 





3 


3 


204 





9 


19 





9 


9 


6 5 


2 


22 


24 





1 1 


i i 


I 7 6 





5 


5 


I 


10 


1 1 


149 


I 


3 


4 


I 


M 


5 


170 


I 


22 


2 3 





IO 


IO 


56 


2 


18 


20 


[ 


5 


6 


J 54 


I 


20 


21 





7 


7 


172 


I 


16 


17 





1 1 


1 1 


141 


12 


1 66 


1 7 8 


3 


107 


no 


i,7i5 



178 killed 10.3 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 638 , died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 29. 



BATTLES. K. &MAV 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va i o 

Cold Harbor, Va 10 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 13 

Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22, 1 864 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Ream s Station, Va i 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Dabney s Mills, Va 3 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 4 



BATTLES. K.&M.W 

Munson s Hill, Va i 

Yorktown, Va 2 

Fair Oaks, Va 2 

Skirmish, Va., June 18, 1862 i 

Picket, Va., June 19, 1862 2 

Savage Station, Va 4 

Glendale, Va 8 

Chantilly, Va i 

Antietam, Md 26 

Fredericksburg, Va 18 

Gettysburg, Pa 56 

Present, also, at Peach Orchard ; Malvern Hill; Chancellorsville ; Bristoe Station; North Anna; Totopot- 
omoy ; Strawberry Plains ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Philadelphia Brigade occupies a prominent place in the history of the battle of Gettysburg. 
Under command of General Alex. S. Webb, it held that particular point on the line which is familiar to the 
battle-field tourists as " the high-water mark of the Rebellion." This position was the focus of a concentrated 
fire during the unprecedented artillery combat of the third day ; and when that storm of missiles was followed by 
the grand assault known as Pickett s charge, the enemy s column made its most daring and desperate thrust 
against that point of the line which was held by Webb and his men. It was here that Cushing s Battery made 
its gallant fight, and here that General Armistead, the leader of the Confederate assault, fell dead at the muzzle 
of one of Cushing s guns. The Sixty-ninth entered that fight with 258 officers and men, and held the stone wall 
in front of the brigade ; it lost there 40 killed, 80 wounded and 9 missing, Colonel O Kane and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Tschudy being among the killed. At Antietam, it was in Sedgwick s Division, and fought at the Dunker 
Church; its loss in that battle was 1 9 killed, 58 wounded, and 15 missing. This regiment, like the New York 
Sixty-ninth, was composed mostly of Irish blood, and fully sustained the reputation of the Irish soldier for gal 
lantry in battle. It was recruited in Philadelphia, and served continuously in the Second Division of the corps. 
General Owen commanded the brigade in the campaigns of 1864. 



278 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY - -" CALIFORNIA REGIMENT." 
PHILADELPHIA BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. EDWARD D. BAKER (Killed). 



(2) COL. ISAAC J. WISTAIt ; BKIG.-GEN. 



(3) COL. RICHARD P. SMITH. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff . 


I 
I 

3 
i 

2 

2 
2 

I 
I 


1 1 

9 

21 
14 

4 
8 
18 

22 
IO 
2O 
10 


I 
12 
12 
22 
16 

4 
8 

20 
2 4 
IO 
21 
I I 



i 




I 






* 

7 
6 

IO 

J 3 

8 

7 

9 

8 

10 

9 
1 1 


* 

7 
6 

10 

13 

8 

8 

9 

8 

10 

9 
1 1 


19 

177 

138 
192 

163 
146 
144 

158 
228 

147 
M3 






B 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Cos. L.M. N.O. P 




M 


147 


161 


I 


98 


99 


J > 6 55 





Total of killed and wounded, 565 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 21. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W 



Picket, Va., Sept. 21, 1861 

Falls Church, Va 

Poolesville, Md 

Ball s Bluff, Va 



Antietam, Md 37 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1862) 9 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1863) i 

Gettysburg, Pa 24 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va i o 

North Anna, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 



I 

3 

i 

34 

Fair Oaks, Va 5 

Picket, Va., June 3, 1862 i 

Picket, Va., June 8,1862 3 

Picket, Va., June 9,1862 i 

Peach Orchard, Va 6 

Savage Station, Va 2 

Glendale, Va 8 i 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Malvern Hill ; Bristoe Station ; Totopotomoy. 

NOTES. Recruited in Philadelphia, May 1861, by Edward D. Baker, United States Senator from California. 
In July the regiment proceeded to Fort Monroe, whence, after a short stay, it returned to Washington and com 
menced active service in Northern Virginia. In October it was assigned to Stone s Division, and soon after took 
part in the affair at Ball s Bluff. Colonel Baker, who was in command of the brigade, was killed there, the regi 
ment losing 13 killed, 40 wounded, and 228 captured or missing. The Seventy-first was organized with fifteen 
companies, but after the Peninsular campaign the five superfluous companies were discontinued, and the men 
transferred to the others. It was assigned to the Second Division of the Second Corps, in which division it 
remained without change. Sedgwick commanded the division at Antietam, where it was engaged in one of the 
bloodiest contests of the war. Its loss in that battle was 26 killed, 95 wounded, and 18 missing one-third of 
its number on that field. At Gettysburg, it was stationed at the angle of the stone wall against which Armistead 
and his Confederate brigade made such a desperate attack during Pickett s charge. In this battle the Seventy- 
first, under Colonel Smith, lost 21 killed, 58 wounded, and 19 missing, out of 24 officers and 397 men carried 
into action. The regiment was mustered out July 9, 1864, i f s term of service having expired 



TIIKEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



27D 



SEVENTY-SECOND PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY -" BAXTER ZOUAVES." 
PHILADELPHIA BRIGADE GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. DE WITT ( . BAXTER ; Bv r. HUIU.-UEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED 


AND DIED OK \ 
Men. 


VofM)-. 

Total. 


DIED OK DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I UIMON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


( >fticcrs. 


( )flU-ere. 


Men. 


i i 


Field and Staff 


I 
2 
2 
I 
I 



I 



2 


I 

M 

22 

18 

26 

16 
1 1 

10 

1 1 

20 


2 
24 

1 9 

27 

16 

12 
10 
21 
II 
20 


I 
I 

* 


I 

8 
1 1 

10 

9 

7 

10 
10 

8 

7 
26 


2 

9 
1 1 

10 
10 

9 

10 
10 

8 

7 
26 


16 
170 

73 

58 
i 76 

79 
1 28 

J 45 
1 60 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Cos. L.M.N.O. P 


Totals 


I I 


182 


93 


2 


117 


119 


,596 





193 killed 12. g per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 736; total of captured and missing, 165. 

K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 

Fair Oaks, Va 3 

Picket, Va. (June 1862) 6 

Savage Station, Va 24 

Antietam, Md 5g 

Fredericksbu rg, Va 9 

Gettysburg, Pa 64 

Bristoe Station, Va i 



BATTLES. K. A M.W 

Mine Run, Va 2 

Wilderness, Va 7 

Spotsylvania, Va 5 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 6 

Petersburg, Va 

Jerusalem Road, Va. 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Peach Orchard ; Glendale ; Malvern Hill ; Chantilly ; Chancellorsville ; North 
Anna. 

NOTES. Recruited in Philadelphia as a "Fire Zouave" regiment. It was organized in August, 1861, with 
fifteen companies, five of which were disbanded in 1862 and the men distributed to the other ten companies. In 
the fall of 1 86 1, the regiment was in Stone s Division, which was guarding the Maryland side of the Upper 
Potomac. In March, 1862, it moved up the Shenandoah Valley in Banks s command, but was transferred soon 
after to the Peninsular Army. There the Philadelphia Brigade was placed under command of General Wm. W. 
Burns, and was assigned to Sedgwick s Division. At Savage Station one of the Seven Days battles the regi 
ment lost 14 killed and 85 wounded; at Antietam it fought under Scdgwick at the Dunker Church, where it lost 
38 killed, 163 wounded, and 36 missing; total, 237. General Alex. S. Webb commanded the brigade at Gettys 
burg. In that battle the Seventy-second occupied an exposed position during the terrible artillery firing of the third 
day, and then took a conspicuous part in the repulse of Pickett s Virginians. The monument of the Seventy- 
second, which stands on that historic spot, states in its inscription, that the regiment had 473 men in line that 
day and that their loss was 44 killed, 145 wounded, and 2 missing; total, 191. At Mine Run, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Theodore Hesser was killed on the skirmish line, while in command of the regiment. Its shortened 
lines were actively engaged in all the battles of the Wilderness campaign, and then, while in the trenches before 
Petersburg, August, 1864, it received the order for its muster-out. 



280 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTY-SIXTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BARTON S BRIGADE TURNER S DIVISION TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN M. POWER. 

(2) COL. D. C. STRAWBRIDGE. 



(3) COL. JOHN C. CAMPBELL. 

(4) COL. JOHN S. LITTELL ; BVT. BRIG. -GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON. &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Meu. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 




I 

2 




2 

3 
i 




* 

20 

u 

H 

10 

3 
26 

13 

M 
20 

7 




21 
16 

M 
IO 

T 3 

28 

13 

i? 

21 
17 


I 




I 

* 










20 
28 

16 

18 

20 
21 

13 

17 
21 

18 


I 

20 
28 

*7 

18 
20 

21 

13 

I? 
21 

18 


20 
2IO 
209 

T 73 

208 

190 
203 
204 
169 

1 86 

170 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E . 


F 


G . 


H 


T 


K. 


Totals . 


9 


161 


1 7 


2 


192 


194 


1,942 





Total of killed and wounded, 623; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 52. 



BATTLES. 

James Island, S. C 

Pocotaligo, S. C 

Fort Wagner, S. C., July n, 1863 

Fort Wagner, S. C., July 18, 1863 , 

Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C 

Chesterfield Heights, Va 

Swift Creek, Va 

Drewry s Bluff, Va 

Present, also, at Fort Pulaski ; Wilmington. 



K. & M. W. 

2 

. 16 

59 

7 

2 

7 
i 



22 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Bermuda Hundred, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 9 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 9 

Petersburg Mine, Va 9 

Deep Bottom, Va 13 

Chaffm s Farm, Va 3 

Darbytown Road, Va 2 

Fort Fisher, N. C 7 



NOTES. Fort Wagner was a memorable locality of the war by reason of many varied incidents of siege and 
assault, together with the dramatic character which invested some of those thrilling scenes. There were two dis 
tinct assaults ; the first occurred July n, 1863, and the second, just one week later. The Seventy-sixth took a 
conspicuous part in the first assault, which was made by three regiments only ; the Ninth Maine, Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania, and the Seventh Connecticut under General Strong the brigade commander. The Seventy-sixth 
occupied the centre of the line, its advance taking it over a ridge where it was exposed to the fire of the fort. 
The assault failed, but not until 1 80 of the regiment had been cut down. Another attempt was made on the 
1 8th with an assaulting column of the three brigades, but it also failed, and General Strong was killed. The 
Seventy-sixth had the honor of participating in the successful assault on Fort Fisher. It was then in Penny- 
packer s Brigade, Ames s Division ; General Terry commanded the expedition. As these troops remained in 
North Carolina, the Tenth Corps which had been discontinued was reorganized with Terry in command. Gen 
eral Pennypacker was badly wounded at Fort Fisher, and Colonel Littell succeed to the command of the brigade. 
The Seventy-sixth was organized at Harrisburg in October, 1861 ; it proceeded immediately to Hilton Head, 
S. C., and remained in that Department until it entered the Virginia campaign of 1864. In the actions at 
Drewry s Bluff and its vicinity the regiment lost 15 killed, 119 wounded, and 10 missing; total, 144. It reen- 
listed and served through the whole period of the war. 



TllKKK HUNDKKD Fl<JHTIN(J HKUIMKNTS. 



281 



EIGHTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
CROSS S BKKJADK - CALIWKIJ/S DIVISION - - SECOND COUPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES MILLER (Killed). 

(2) COL. CHARLES F. JOHNSON. 



(8) COL. HENRY HOYI) MrKEKN (Killwl). 
(4) COL. WILLIAM WILSON. 



Losses. 




Officers. 
. l8 

2 


En. Afcn. 
190 

75 

21 


Total. 
208 

77 

21 










Totals .... 






20 


286 


306 


Total enrollment, 1,608 ; killed, 
Battles. 
Fair Oiks Va. 


208 12.9 per cent. 

KilU 
8 


3 2 
4 
5 

5 
104 

44 
141 

38 

49 

5 
6 

63 
i 

33 
18 

6 

9 
8 

4 
23 


ft/. * Missing. \ 
51 

I 

12 

5 

2 

20 
19 

8 

4 

i 

3 
i 

4 
i 


Total. 
9 1 

7 
18 

5 
130 

22 

5 

6 1 
62 

5 
7 
77 

2 

44 

2 5 

i i 

28 

12 

7 
35 














Glendale Va. 




Malvern Hill Vi. 


6 












4. 






















Cold Harbor Va. 


8 




6 































Totals 128 643 147 918 

Present, also, at Yorktown ; Peach Orchard ; Wilderness ; Po River ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; 
Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Philadelphia in October, 1861 . After encamping near Washington for several months, 
it commenced active service in the field, March, 1862, then in- Howard s (ist) Brigade, Richardson s (ist) 
Division, Sumner s (zd) Corps. Colonel Miller was killed in the first battle Fair Oaks and at Malvern Hill 
his successor, Lieutenant-Colonel Eli T. Conner, fell dead while gallantly leading his men. The division was com 
manded by Hancock at Fredericksburg, where the Eighty-first took part in the memorable assault of that day, 
losing 176 out of 261 present on the field. Enough of the men reenlisted, in January, 1864, to ensure a contin 
uance of the organization, and they received a veteran furlough. Hard fighting with further heavy losses were 
encountered in Grant s campaigns, and at Cold Harbor, Colonel McKeen, was killed, while in command of a 
brigade. The Eighty-first took part in all the battles of the First Division, being hotly engaged at Farmville, at 
which place the Second Corps fought its last battle. 



282 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



EIGHTY-THIRD PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BARTLETT S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION - - FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN W. McLANE (Killed). 

(2) COL. STRONG VINCENT ; BRIG. -GEN. (Killed). 



(3) COL. O. S. WOODWARD ; BYT. BRIG.-GEN. 

(4) COL. CHAUNCEY P. ROGERS. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUXDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 






2 

I 
2 

2 







2 3 

22 
2O 

25 

3 1 

26 

22 
28 

45 
28 

i 


4 

2 3 

22 

2O 

2 5 

33 

27 

24 
28 

47 
28 

i 


I 
I 









12 

16 

IO 

II 

J 9 
16 

14 

22 

9 

22 




* 

12 

16 
II 

12 

T 9 
16 

14 

22 

9 

22 




20 
172 

116 
188 
162 
236 

200 
I6 7 

*73 

i93 
181 




Company A 


B 


c . 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Band 




II 


271 


282 


2 


15* 


] 53 


i, 808 





282 killed = 15. 5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded 071 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 23. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Hanover Court House, Va i 

Gaines s Mill, Va 6 1 

Malvern Hill, Va 50 

Manassas, Va 26 

Fredericksburg, Va 5 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 18 

Guerrillas, Va., December 10, 1863 i 

Wilderness, Va 20 

North Anna, Va. 2 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8th . 57 

Spotsylvania, Va., May loth 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 15 

Peebles s Farm, Va i o 

Dabney s Mills, Va 5 

Gravelly Run, Va i 

White Oak Road, Va 3 

Five Forks, Va i 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Mechanicsville ; Peach Orchard ; Savage Station ; White Oak Swamp ; Glen- 
dale ; Antietam ; Shepherdstown Ford; Aldie ; Rappahannock Station ; Mine Run; Totopotomoy ; Weldon 
Railroad ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. The Eighty-third encountered more fighting and lost more men in battle than any other Pennsyl 
vania regiment ; in fact, its loss in action was exceeded by only one other in the entire Union army. None of its 
losses were caused by blunders, none occurred in disastrous routs ; its dead always lay with their faces to the 
enemy. With its " twin regiment," the Forty-fourth New York, it was assigned to Butterfield s Brigade, Morell s 
Division, Fifth Corps. Colonel McLane was killed at Gaines s Mill, and Vincent fell at Gettysburg while in 
command of the brigade. At Gaines s Mill, the regiment lost 46 killed, 51 wounded, and 99 missing ; four days 
later, at Malvern Hill, it lost 33 killed, 115 wounded, and 18 missing a total of 362, out of the 554 present at 
Gaines s Mill. At Manassas, under Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy, it lost 14 killed, 72 wounded, and n missing, 
out of 224 officially reported by McCoy as present and engaged. It had the honor, at Gettysburg, of participat 
ing in the brilliant manoeuvre of its brigade .Vincent s in seizing Little Round Top at a critical moment, 
helping materially to save the fortunes of the day. At Spotsylvania, its casualties amounted to 21 killed, 119 
wounded, and 24 missing; total, 164. General McClellan once publicly pronounced the Eighty-third "one of 
the very best regiments in the army." 



TIIKI.I; I li M>I;I:I> I- HUI i 1\. L I:<,IMI \ rs. 



I -: , 



EIGHTY-FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 

CARR S BRIGADE- -HUMPHREYS S DIVISION THIRD COUPS. 



(1) COL. WILLIAM G. MURRAY (Killed). 



(2) COL. SAMUEL M. BOWMAN ; BVT. BRIO. OEN. 



COMPANIES 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUND*. 


DlKDOK DlSKASK, AcflDKNTN, IN I lllWIIX, <fcf. 


Total 
Knrollmrnt. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Start 


2 

I 





I 



I 

* 


I 




14 

8 

12 
10 

4 

18 

10 
IO 
IO 

3 


2 
5 

8 

I 2 
IO 

5 
18 

ii 

10 
IO 

14 










I 








7 
1 1 

ii 
10 

12 

9 

IO 

7 
1 1 

10 




7 
1 1 

1 1 

10 
I 2 

9 
I I 

7 
1 1 

10 


9 
128 

81 
172 

11 3 
3 1 

10 5 
1 20 

90 

59 
,67 


( omnAnv A . 


B . 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


6 


119 


I2 5 


I 


98 


99 


1,285 





Total of killed and wounded, 491 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 17. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Kernstown, Va 30 

Port Republic, Va 3 

Cedar Mountain, Va i 

Manassas, Va 2 

Fredericksburg, Va 1 1 

Chancellorsville, Va 29 

Mine Run, Va 4 

Wilderness, Va i o 



BATTLES. 

Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna, Va 

Totopotomoy, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va 

Petersburg, Va 

Deep Bottom, Va 

Poplar Spring Church, Va, 



K.&M.W. 
. . . 12 

3 

4 

3 

8 

4 
. . . i 



Present, also, at Front Royal ; Kelly s Ford ; Strawberry Plains ; Hatcher s Run. 



NOTES. Although a Third Corps regiment, the Eighty-fourth saw much .active service while in other com 
mands. Soon after its organization, in 1861, it was ordered to the Upper Potomac, and thence to the Shenandoah 
Valley where it served under General Lander, and, after his death, in Shields s Division. It was with Shields at 
Kernstown, and was hotly engaged there ; Colonel Murray and two line officers were killed there, the regiment 
losing 21 killed, and 71 wounded. At Cedar Mountain and Manassas it was in Ricketts s Division, of McDowell s 
Corps; at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville it was in Carroll s Brigade, Whipple s Division, Third Corps. At 
Chancellorsville it lost 215 in killed, wounded, missing, and prisoners, out of 391 present. The regiment was not 
engaged at Gettysburg, having been detailed as a train-guard. Upon the discontinuance of the Third Corps it 
was again transferred, this time to Mott s Division, Second Corps. Colonel Bowman having been detailed on 
duty elsewhere, the command of the regiment devolved on Lieutenant-Colonel Milton Opp, an experienced and 
efficient officer who fell mortally wounded at the Wilderness. The regiment was mustered-out in November, 1864, 
but enough recruits and rei -nlisted men remained to form a battalion of four companies. This battalion was 
consolidated January 13, 1865, with the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania, and Lieutenant-Colonel Zinn of the Eighty - 
fourth became colonel of the Fifty-seventh. Its casualties at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania May 5-13, 1864, 
were 13 killed, 70 wounded, and 2 missing. 



284 



EEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



NINETY-THIRD PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
WHEATON S BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JAMES M. McOARTER. 



(2) COL. JOHN M. MARK. 



(3) COL. CHARLES W. ECKMAN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 




3 



3 


2 
I 
I 
I 




I 

M 

2O 

16 

12 
12 

15 
M 
21 

M 

22 


I 

I? 

20 

J 9 

12 

14 

16 
15 

22 

M 

22 


I 















7 
9 
9 
J 3 

12 

T 3 

8 

10 

J 3 

7 


I 

7 
9 
9 
13 

12 
J 3 

8 

10 

T 3 

7 


17 

189 

181 

204 

183 
196 

203 

183 
171 
214 
167 




B 


C. 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


T , 


K 


Totals 


I I 


161 


172 


I 


IOI 


IO2 


1,908 





Total of killed and wounded, 641. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Williamsburg, Va 8 

Fair Oaks, Va 40 

Salem Heights, Va 14 

Gettysburg, Pa i 

Wilderness, Va 34 

Spotsylvania, Va 19 

Cold Harbor, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va. ( 1 864) 4 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Fort Stevens, D. C i 

Berryville, Va i 

Charlestown, W. Va 5 

Opequon, Va 1 1 

Fisher s Hill, Va 2 

Cedar Creek, Va 9 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 15 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 5 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Malvern Hill ; Seven Days ; Fredericksburg ; Marye s Heights ; Sailor s Creek ; 
Appomattox. 



NOTES. This regiment was raised through the efforts of Colonel McCarter, a Methodist clergyman who had 
served as a Chaplain in the three months service. It was organized at Lebanon, Pa., in October, 1861. In March, 
1862, it was assigned to Peck s Brigade, Couch s Division, Fourth Corps, and went to the Peninsula. The regi 
ment was in the hottest of the fight at Fair Oaks, where it displayed remarkable steadiness under fire. Its losses 
there were 20 killed, 84 wounded, and 22 missing; Colonel McCarter was severely wounded and lost two horses 
killed. After Antietam the division was transferred to the Sixth Corps, the Ninety-third becoming a part of 
Rowley s Brigade, Newton s Division. General Wheaton commanded the brigade at Salem Heights, where the 
regiment lost 8 killed, 53 wounded, and 18 missing. In February, 1864, about 300 reenlisted, and a large num 
ber of recruits were received. The regiment entered the spring campaign of 1864 with about 750 men; in the 
opening battle at the Wilderness it lost 15 killed and 114 wounded, which was followed the next week by further 
heavy losses at Spotsylvania. It fought under Sheridan in the Valley, and at the Opequon lost 7 killed and 32 
wounded. Returning to Petersburg, it was engaged with severe loss, March 25, 1865, in the advance of the 
Sixth Corps at the time Fort Stedman was re-captured. Having served through the whole war, it was mustered 
out June 27, 1865. 



TmtEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



NINETY-FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
UPTON S BRIGADE -- WRIGHT S DIVISION --SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN M. GOSL1NE (Killed). 



(2) COL. GUSTAVU8 W. TOWN (Killed). 



(3) COL. JOHN HAKl EK. 



(. OMI AMKH. 


KM run AM> DIED OK WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIIINON, Ac. 


T-.tnl 
Enrollment. 


( tfllitere. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff 


6 

I 

2 

* 

I 

1 




23 
14 
22 

18 
16 

23 

1 1 

15 

1 2 

7 


6 
24 
>4 
24 
18 

16 
24 

12 

5 
I 2 

17 







1 


* 



6 

7 
10 

8 

ID 

5 
9 
7 
7 
3 




6 

7 
10 

8 
10 

5 

IO 

7 
7 
3 


H 
229 

198 
246 
205 
21 2 

U8 

222 

190 
74 

34 


(Company A 


B 


C . 


D 


E . 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


1 1 


171 


182 


I 


7 2 


73 


1)962 





Total of killed and wounded, 667 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 13. 
BATTLKS. K. &M.W. BATTLES. 



West Point, Va 8 

Gaines s Mill, Va 31 

Crampton s Pass, Md 2 

Antietam, Md 3 

Fredericksburg, Va i 

Salem Heights, Va 39 

Gettysburg, Pa i 

Rappahannock Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 12 

Spotsylvania, Va 41 



K AM w. 
Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Petersburg, Va. ( 1 864) j 

Charlestown, W. Va 2 

Fisher s Hill, Va i 

New Market, Va i 

Cedar Creek, Va 15 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 i 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 3 

Sailor s Creek, Va 12 



Present, also, at Seven Days ; Marye s Heights ; Mine Run ; Fort Stevens ; Opequon ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. The Ninety-fifth lost six field officers, killed in action ; two colonels, two lieutenant-colonels, a 
major and an adjutant, a loss in mounted officers, with but one parallel in all the regiments in the war. I 
was raised in Philadelphia, and arrived at Washington in October, 1861. It passed the winter of 1861-2 in 
winter-quarters near Alexandria, Va., and took the field in March, 1862. After taking part in the advance on 
Manassas, it proceeded to the Peninsula, with Newton s Brigade, P ranklin s Division, and with this command 
was engaged at West Point. Slocum succeeded to the command of the division, which, under his charge, dis 
tinguished itself at Gaines s Mill. In that battle Colonel Gosline and Major Wm. B. Hubbs were killed ; the 
regiment lost there 10 killed, 84 wounded, and 1 8 missing. At Salem Heights the regiment fought in Russell s 
Brigade of Brooks s Division, its losses there amounting to 23 killed, no wounded, and 20 missing; total, 153. 
In this action, Colonel Town, Lieutenant-Colonel Hall, Adjutant Dunton, and two line officers were killed. 
About 250 men rei : nlisted, and, a large number of recruits having been received, the Ninety- fifth entered the 
Wilderness campaign with nearly its full complement of men. Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Carroll, the com 
mandant of the regiment, fell dead in the first day s fighting at the Wilderness. During the fighting at Spot 
sylvania, it lost 26 killed, 82 wounded, and 27 missing ; and at Cedar Creek, 8 killed, 27 wounded, and 4 missing. 



286 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



NINETY-SIXTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BARTLETT S BRIGADE BROOKS S DIVISION - - SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY L. CAKE. 



(2) COL WILLIAM H. LESSIG. 



G OMPANIKS. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 
I 
I 




I 




* 




16 

6 

12 

13 
!7 

8 

5 

18 
9 

1 2 


2 

7 

7 
13 
J 3 
T 7 
9 

J 5 
18 

9 

] 2 










I 




8 
8 

7 
8 

12 

6 

9 
10 

5 
1*3 


8 
8 

7 
8 

12 

6 

9 
10 

5 
M 


15 

JI 5 
107 

iii 
94 
J 33 

IO2 
III 
126 

I0 5 
*34 




B 


C . 


D. 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals . 


6 


1 26 


132 


1 


86 


87 


M53 





132 killed = n. 4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 429 ; captured and missing, 64 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 12. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W, 

Gaines s Mill, Va 18 

Crampton s Gap, Md 27 

Antietam, Md 2 

Bowling Green Road, Va j 
Salem Heights, Va. ) 



BATTLES. 

Wilderness, Va 

Spotsylvania, Va 

Cedar Creek, Va 

Cold Harbor, Va o 3 



K.&M. W. 
3 

. ... 59 
3 



Present, also, at West Point ; Seven Days ; Fredericksburg ; Marye s Heights (1863) ; Gettysburg; Rappa- 
hannock Station ; Petersburg; Opequon ; Fisher s Hill. 



NOTES. Recruited mostly in Schuylkill County. It left the State in November, 1861, and, arriving in Vir 
ginia soon after, was assigned to Slocum s Brigade, Franklin s Division. General Slocum commanded the division 
at Gaines s Mill, where the regiment was engaged and received a gratifying mention in the official reports. 
Loss, at Gaines s Mill, 13 killed, 6 1 wounded, and 13 missing. It again distinguished itself in the successful 
charge at Crampton s Gap, where Major Lewis J. Martin was killed. It sustained the heaviest loss of any 
regiment in that action, its casualties amounting to 20 killed and 70 wounded fully one-fourth of the 
number engaged. Still harder fighting and greater losses were encountered in 1864, at Spotsylvania, where the 
Ninety-sixth was selected as one of the twelve regiments of the Sixth Corps to take part in Upton s charge ; it 
proved a dearly bought honor, its losses there, and in the other fighting about Spotsylvania, amounting to 31 
killed, 115 wounded, and 32 missing; total, 178. During this campaign the regiment was still in the First 
Brigade, First Division, Sixth Corps, General Upton commanding the brigade, and General Wright, the division. 
Subsequently, General Russell succeeded to the command of the division. Not enough of the men reenlisted 
to warrant the continuance of the regimental organization after the expiration of its term of service, which 
occurred September 22, 1864, while in the Shenandoah campaign. The original members of the regiment 
returned to their homes, and the reenlisted veterans, together with the recruits, were transferred to the Ninety- 
fifth Pennsylvania. 



THREE HUNDRED FICJIITING REGIMENTS. 



NINETY-SEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 

I ENXYI ACKER S I ,i;i ; \ HI . AMES S DIVISION -- TENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. HENRY R. GUS8. (2) COL. GALUSHA PENNYPAOKER; BVT. MAJOH GEN. (3) COL. JOHN WAINWRIGHT ; BVT. MAJOII-GEK. 



< OMPANIKS. 


KILLED AND DIED <>K WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN I UISON. &e. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


( tffieers. 


Men. 


Total 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 




1 




2 



I 

I 
I 


I 

3 
8 

3 

12 
IO 

2 5 
IO 

15 

9 
M 


2 

3 

8 

3 
4 
10 

2 5 
1 1 

15 

10 

15 


* 



I 







I 




5 
2 3 

2 5 

I 2 

27 

15 

2 3 

16 
16 

1 2 




15 
2 3 

26 

12 

2 7 

5 
2 3 
16 

i" 

I 2 


16 
217 
194 
213 
181 

221 

1 93 

195 

216 

163 
9S 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


6 


130 


136 


2 


l8 4 


186 


2,004 





Total of killed and wounded, 519, died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 20. 
Of the 1,039 originally enrolled, 104 were killed, and 117 died of disease. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

James s Island, S. C 4 

Morris Island, S. C 4 

Ware Bottom Church Va., May 18, 1864 14 

Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 20, 1864 56 

Bermuda Hundred, Va., August 25, 1864 2 

Picket, S. C., April, 1863 i 

Picket, Va., August 25, j 864 i 

Cold Harbor, Va i 



BATTLES. K.&M. \V. 

Petersburg, Va 5 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 14 

Petersburg Mine, Va i i 

Strawberry Plains, Va 10 

Chaffin s Farm, Va 2 

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 2 

Fort Fisher, N. C 9 



Present, also, at John s Island, S. C. ; Fort Wagner, S. C. ; Swift Creek, Va. ; Drewry s Bluff, Va. ; Wilming 
ton, N. C. 

NOTES. Eight companies were recruited in Chester County, and the others in Delaware. It left the State 
November, 1861, going to Fort Monroe, and thence to Port Royal, S. C. It remained in that Department sixteen 
months, during which it made several expeditions along the Florida and Georgia coast, and was under fire in some 
minor engagements. It took part in the operations about Charleston Harbor, and in the grand assault on Fort 
Wagner, in which affair it was in Stevenson s Brigade of reserves. In April, 1863, it left Fernandina, Fla., and 
sailed for Virginia, where it joined the Army of the James, having been assigned to White s (ist) Brigade, 
Ames s (3d) Division, Tenth Corps. In the fighting at Green Plains, near Bermuda Hundred, May i8th and 
2Oth, it lost 29 killed, 186 wounded, and 22 captured or missing ; total, 237 ; seve"n color bearers were shot, and 
Colonel Pennypacker was wounded three times. The regiment occupied an exposed position in the trenches 
before Petersburg, and lost men almost daily during the siege, in addition to those lost in the fighting at the 
Mine Explosion. It had in the meanwhile been transferred to the Second Division, in which it afterwards re 
mained without further change. Colonel Pennypacker commanded the brigade at Chaffin s Farm, where he was 
again wounded. He led the brigade, also, in its victorious assault at Fort Fisher, where he received another 
serious wound while planting the colors of the Ninty-seventh on the enemy s inner line of works. 



288 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CVIIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDREDTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY -"ROUNDHEADS." 
LEASURE S BRIGADE STEVENSON S DIVISION NINTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. DANIEL LEASURE ; BVT. BKIG. GEN. 



(2) Coi.. NORMAN J. MAXWELL ; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PUISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 
I 

2 

I 




I 

2 

I 
I 

3 






18 

13 

27 

21 

3 

22 
20 
12 
6 

J 9 

20 


4 

!9 

J 5 
28 

21 

3 
2 3 

22 
!3 

7 

22 
20 





* 

2 








I 
22 

17 
20 

t$ 

21 

21 
16 
12 
8 

J 7 
r 3 


I 

22 

I? 

2O 

15 
21 

23 

16 

12 

8 

17 
13 


18 
184 
184 
198 
192 
191 

2OI 
2O2 

181 

82 

1 86 
195 




B . 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


M 




Totals 


16 


208 


224 


2 


183 


185 


2,014 





224 killed = ii. i per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 887 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 29. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Legare s Point, S. C 3 

James Island, S. C 13 

Manassas, Va 27 

Chantilly, Va 7 

South Mountain, Md 12 

Antietam, Md 2 

Jackson, Miss i 

Blue Springs, Tenn i 

Campbell s Station, Tenn i 

Siege of Knoxville, Tenn 5 

Wilderness, Va 4 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 18 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 21 

Petersburg Mine, Va 23 

Weidon Railroad, Va 7 

Poplar Spring Church, Va 5 

Boydton Road, Va i 

Picket, Va., Dec. 13, 1864 i 

Fort Stedman, Va 22 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 



Spotsylvania, Va 44 

Present, also, at Port Royal, S. C. ; Coosaw River, S. C. ; Fredericksburg, Va. ; Vicksburg, Miss. 

NOTES. The Pennsylvania Roundheads proved on many a hard fought field that they were worthy of their 
nom de guerre, and their ancestral namesakes. Bates, the historian, says that they were recruited in a part of the 
State which was settled by English Roundheads and Scotch-Irish Covenanters. Be that as it may, there was no 
stancher stuff in Cromwell s regiments than in the blue-coated line that dressed on the colors of the Hundredth 
Pennsylvania. They were well officered, Colonel Leasure being a man of remarkable soldierly ability, and 
although in command of the brigade most of the time, the regiment was always ably handled. Lieut.-Col. Dawson 
fell, mortally wounded, in the assault on Petersburg ; Lieut.-Col. Pentecost was killed at Fort Stedman ; Major 
Hamilton and Adjutant Leasure fell in the fighting at the Petersburg Mine. Five line-officers fell at Manassas, 
the casualties in that battle amounting to 15 killed, 117 wounded, and 8 missing. At Spotsylvania it sustained 
a loss of 23 killed, 1 10 wounded, and 2 missing ; total, 135. Like all the Ninth Corps regiments its service was a 
varied one ; it made long journeys by sea and land, and fought its battles in many and widely separated States. 



THREE HUNDRED FH;HTIX<J REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
WHEATON S BRIGADE -- GETTY S DIVISION -- SIXTH CORPS. 



(1)COL. THOMAS A. ROWLEY; BRIU.-KN. 
(2) COL. JOS K I ll M. KINKKAD. 



(8) COL. JOHN W. PATTERSON (Killed) 
(4) COL. JAMKS PATCIIELL. 



COMPANIES. 


KII.LKH ANI> l>n ii or WOI;NDM. 


DlKIl OK DlSKAHK, AcriDKNTH, IN PKIBON, &C. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


( ifllcers 


Men. 


Total. 


( >flictT8. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


4 



i 

2 

I 



I 




I 







15 
4 
1 1 

10 

9 

M 
6 

34 
1 1 

7 
16 

14 


4 
IS 

5 

13 

1 1 

19 

5 
6 

34 
1 1 

8 
16 
14 














i 




i 
8 

4 
6 

8 
6 

5 
5 

13 

6 

6 

7 
6 


I 

8 

4 
6 
8 
6 

5 
5 

*3 

6 

6 
8 
6 


17 
201 

.65 
178 
184 
170 
171 
1 60 
198 
140 
.78 

171 

1 66 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 




Totals 


10 


i?i 


181 


i 


81 


82 


2,099 





Total of killed and wounded, 68<) ; total of captured or missing. 140 

K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 

Williamsburg, Va 5 

Fair Oaks, Va 18 

Savage Station, Va i 

Malvern Hill, Va 12 

Salem Heights, Va 21 

Wilderness, Va 48 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 

Cold Harbor, Va 15 



BATTLES. K & M.W. 

Petersburg, Va. (1864) 6 

Charlestown, W. Va i 

Opequon, Va 1 6 

Strasburg, Va i 

Fisher s Hill, Va 2 

Cedar Creek, Va 21 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 2 

Fall of Petersburg 2 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Fredericksburg ; Gettysburg ; Rappahannock Station ; Fort Stevens ; Sailor s 
Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Pittsburg in August, 1861. Five companies went to Washington that month, the others 
following soon after. It occupied winter-quarters near the Capitol, where the time was spent in drills and light 
duty. It embarked at Alexandria in March, 1862, and proceeded with General McClellan s Army to the Peninsula, 
where it took part in the operations before Yorktown, and did some good fighting at Williamsburg. It fought at 
Fair Oaks, in Peck s Brigade, Couch s Division, Fourth Corps, losing there i 2 killed, 47 wounded, and 10 missing. 
At Malvern Hill it made a successful charge, in which Major Poland was killed. Immediately after Antietam the 
division was transferred, and became Newton s Division of the Sixth Corps. General Wheaton commanded the 
brigade in the fighting at Marye s Heights and Salem Church, in which the regiment lost 12 killed, 54 wounded, 
and 103 missing or captured. Nearly all the men rei ; nlisted, and a large number of recruits were received, which 
enabled it to take the field in 1864 with full ranks. The regiment encountered its hardest battle at the Wilderness, 
where its casualties amounted to 163 in killed and wounded. Colonel Patterson was among the killed. Lieu 
tenant-Colonel Mcllwaine lost his life at Cold Harbor, and Major Coleman was killed while leading the regiment 
at Cedar Creek. In the latter action the regiment lost 1 2 killed and 80 wounded. 
19 



290 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDEED AND FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
GRAHAM S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



(1) COL AMOR A. McKNIGHT (Killed). 

(2) COL. WILLIAM W. CORBETT. 



(3) COL. CALVIN A. CRAIG (Killed). 

(4) COL. JAMES MILLER. 



COMPANIES 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


4 
i 
i 

2 
2 



I 



I 

2 





23 

3 
J 9 

21 
2O 
2 7 
21 
21 
28 
21 


4 
24 

3 1 
21 

2 3 
2O 

28 
21 

22 

3 

21 








* 







17 

15 

12 

8 
II 

12 

r 3 

!? 

22 

12 




I? 

15 
12 

8 
ii 

12 

3 
17 

22 

12 


18 

203 
204 
214 

193 
192 

184 
187 
208 
198 
191 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E . 


F . 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


14 


231 


245 





T 39 


T 39 


1,992 





245 killed = 12.2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded 783; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 



BATTLES. K & M. W. 

Fair Oaks, Va 53 

Oak Grove, Va 3 

Chickahominy, Va i 

Glendale, Va 22 

Malvern Hill, Va i 

Warrenton Junction, Va 3 

Manassas, Va 10 

Fredericksburg, Va 3 

Chancellorsville, Va 14 

Gettysburg, Pa 22 

Auburn, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 56 



K.&M.W. 

8 

... 2 

4 



BATTLES. 

Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna, Va 

Totopotomy, Va 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 10 

Jerusalem Road, Va 2 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Deep Bottom, Va 8 

Weldon Railroad, Va., Oct. 2, 1864 i 

Boydton Road, Va 1 1 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 25, 1865 2 

Hatcher s Run, Va., March 30, 1865 i 

Sailor s Creek, Va 2 



Present, also, at Yorktown ; Williamsburg ; Chantilly ; Kelly s Ford ; Mine Run ; Po River ; Cold Harbor ; 
Strawberry Plains ; Poplar Spring Church ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited from the counties of Jefferson, Clarion, and Clearfield. The men were mostly from the 
forest regions, possessing the hardy characteristics and manly traits incidental to mountaineers and lumbermen. 
The regiment left its barracks in Pittsburg in November, 1861. After some hard service in the trenches before 
Yorktown, and some skirmishing at Williamsburg then in Kearny s Division, it faced the enemy at Fair Oaks, 
in one of the deadliest struggles of the war, winning praise from generals and historians alike. Its losses at 
Fair Oaks were large 41 killed, 112 wounded, and 8 missing; total, 161. At Gettysburg, the regiment took 
247 men into action, and lost 8 killed, 115 wounded, and 9 missing; total, 132, or more than half. In April, 
1864, the division was transferred to the Second Corps, the One Hundred and Fifth being assigned to Gen 
eral Alex. Hays s Brigade. In the first battle of the ensuing campaign the Wilderness it lost 38 killed, 
1 16 wounded, and 6 missing. Lieutenant-Colonel Greenwalt was killed at the Wilderness, Colonel McKnight 
at Chancellorsville, Colonel Craig at Deep Bottom, and Major John C. Conser at the Boydton Road. 



THREE. HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
KANE S BRIGADE GEARY S DIVISION - - TWELFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. MATTHEW SCHLAUDKCKER. (2) COL. GEORGE A. coBIIAM, Jit. (Killed); BVT. RRKI.-OKN. 

(3) COL. THOMAS M. WALKER ; HVT. BIUO.-GKN. 



COMPANIES. 


Kii i MI AND DIED or WOUNDS. 


DIED or DINKAMK, ACCIDKNTM, IN PRISON, <kc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Offloera. 


Men 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 
2 





I 




I 






5 

9 

i7 
1 9 
M 

3 

6 

9 
T 3 
13 


2 

16 

21 

17 

1 9 
14 
14 
6 

9 
i4 
3 


I 
I 




I 



I 


* 

M 

16 

14 
18 

21 

22 

M 
I I 

3 

I 2 


I 

5 
16 

14 
18 

21 

23 
14 
12 

13 
12 


2O 

1 66 
1 88 
197 
196 
194 
199 

75 

58 
179 

1 80 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K. 


Totals 


7 


138 


145 


4 


"55 


^59 


1,852* 





Total of killed and *vounded, 549. 



BATTLES. 



K.&.M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K.&M.W. 



Cedar Mountain, Va 21 

Antietam, Md , 33 

Chancellorsville, Va 6 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 

Wauhatchie, Tenn 13 

Ix>okout Mountain, Tenn 3 

Resaca, Ga 5 

Cassville, Ga i 

Peach Tree Creek, Ga 24 



New Hope Church, Ga 9 

Dallas, Ga., May 27,1 864 2 

Dallas, Ga., May 28, 1864 i 

Dallas, Ga., May 29, 1 864 i 

Dallas, Ga., May 31,1 864 3 

Pine Knob, Ga., June 15, 1864 4 

Gulp s Farm, Ga., June i 7, 1864 3 

Grier s Farm, Ga., June 21,1 864 3 

Kenesaw Mountain, Ga 3 



Atlanta, Ga., July 28, 1864 i Sherman s March (foraging) 3 

Present, also, at Manassas ; Missionary Ridge ; Ringgold, Ga. ; Rocky Face Ridge ; Savannah. Ga. 

NOTES. Recruited in Erie, Warren, and Crawford Counties, and organized at Erie in January, 1862. It 
was quartered in Baltimore during the following March and April. In May it joined Banks s command at Harper s 
Ferry, having been assigned to Prince s Brigade, of Augur s Division, in which it fought at Cedar Mountain. The 
regiment was commanded in that battle by Major Walker, its casualties amounting to 7 killed, 74 wounded, and 9 
missing. The division, under General Greene, distinguished itself at Antietam by the tenacity with which it held 
its position near the Dunker Church. The regiment took only 243 men into that action, but lost 26 killed, 76 
wounded, and 8 missing. In March, 1863, the One Hundred and Eleventh was one of ten regiments in the 
Army of the Potomac, especially mentioned in General Orders as standing best in the inspection reports. In 
September, 1863, the corps was ordered to Tennessee, and on October 28, 1863, the regiment fought at Wau 
hatchie, Tenn., where Major Boyle was killed. In the Atlanta campaign its fighting was continuous and severe, 
the hardest battle for the One Hundred and Eleventh occurring at Peach Tree Creek, where Colonel Cobham 
was killed. The regiment marched from Atlanta to the sea, and while in the Carolinas the One Hundred and 
Ninth Pennsylvania was discontinued, and the men were transferred to its ranks. 



* The enrollment includes 308 men, transferred from the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania, in March, I8C5, after the 
ended. 



had 



292 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
IRISH BRIGADE BARLOW S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. DENNIS HEENAN. 



(2) COL. ST CLAIR MULHOLLAND ; Bvr. MAJ. GEN. 
(3) COL. DAVID W. MEGRAW. 



COMPANIES. 




KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 



I 

2 



* 


2 
I 




5 
6 

6 
ii 

J 5 
25 
J 5 
15 
15 
24 


I 
6 
6 

7 
J 3 
5 
2 5 
15 
15 
17 
2 5 







I 









* 

6 

7 
6 

9 

7 

12 
15 

8 
6 

12 




6 

7 
6 
10 

7 

12 
15 

8 
6 

12 


16 

109 
181 
140 
198 

J 93 
144 

181 
186 
141 

172 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


137 


145 


I 


88 


8 9 


1,661 





Tocal of killed and wounded, 528 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 28. 



BATTLES. 



K. &M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K. &M.W. 



Cold Harbor, Va 22 

Petersburg Assault, June 16, 1864 10 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 8 

Williams Farm, Va., June 22, 1864 8 

Deep Bottom, Va 3 

Ream s Station, Va 1 1 

White Oak Road, March 31, 1865 4 

Sutherland Station, April 2, 1865 i 



Fredericksburg, Va 25 

Chancellorsville, Va 2 

Gettysburg, Pa 3 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 13 

Po River, Va., May i o 4 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 21 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18 7 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Present, also, at Mine Run ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Farmville ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Pennsylvania furnished a regiment for the famous Irish Brigade ; it was the One Hundred and 
Sixteenth. It was recruited in Philadelphia in the summer of 1862, and leaving the State in September, pro 
ceeded to Virginia. In October it joined the main army, then at Harper s Ferry, where it was assigned to the 
Irish Brigade, Hancock s Division. It took part in the bloody assault on Marye s Heights, where each man in 
the brigade placed a sprig of green in his cap just before the charge, and where so many of them fell in front of 
the enemy s works. The official reports state that this regiment had 247 men in line that day; their loss was 
7 killed, 67 wounded, and 14 missing; all three of its field-officers were wounded. After this battle the regi 
ment was consolidated into a battalion of four companies, as it had become much reduced in numbers. At 
Chancellorsville the regiment received words of praise from Hancock for gallant services rendered on that field. 
In the spring of 1864, six new companies were recruited, and the old battalion companies were filled up to their 
maximum. Three of the new companies were from Pittsburg ; they were raised by Lieutenant-Colonel Richard 
C. Dale, who was killed at Spotsylvania. From the Wilderness to Appomattox, the One Hundred and Sixteenth 
was engaged in all the battles of the First Division, and proved itself worthy of a place in the brigade. Colonel 
Mulholland, who commanded the battalion in 1863, led the reorganized regiment in most of its battles, and was 
badly wounded at Spotsylvania. 



TllRKK Hi M>Ki:i> Fl(JHTINi I J I . . I M K.NTS. 



293 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. -"(JOHN 

EXCHANGE REGIMENT." 

BARTLETT S BRIGADE GRIFFIN S DIVISION --FIFTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. CHAKLES M. I HEVOST ; BVT. BKIU. HEN. 



(2) COL. JAMES (JWYN ; HVT. MAJOU (iK.s. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIEI> or Worxint. 


DIED OK DISEASE, ACCIUKNTH, I.x I lunox, Ac. 


Total 

Knr. ill IIH ni 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field ami Staff. . 



* 




I 

2 

3 




3 




M 
12 

14 
II 
21 
12 
II 

7 
16 

14 




M 
12 

14 
I I 

22 
14 
M 
7 

16 

17 





I 

* 











9 
7 
6 

M 

18 

9 
7 
5 
14 

12 




9 

7 
7 
M 
18 

9 
7 
IS 
4 

12 


5 

3 
117 

1 20 
123 

I2 3 

I2 5 
114 

128 
149 

3 


C\nin:inv A . 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals . 


9 


132 


141 


I 


III 


I 12 


1,^76 





141 killed ii percent. 

Total of killed and wounded, 502 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 73. 
BATTLES. K.AM.W BATTLES. 



K.&M.U. 



Totopotomoy, Va i 

Bethesda Church, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Weldon Railroad, Va . v i 

Peeble s Farm, Va 1 1 

Dabney s Mills, Va i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Hatcher s Run, March 29, 1865 i 

Gravelly Run, Va., March 31,1 865 i 

Five Forks, Va., April i , 1 865 i 



Shepherdstown, Va 78 

Fredericksburg, Va 14 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 3 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 6 

Spotsylvania, Va 1 1 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 i 

Bowling Green, Va i 

North Anna, Va i 

Present, also, at Antietam ; Rappahannock Station ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Known in the Corps as " the regiment that fought at Shepherdstown." The One Hundred and 
Eighteenth had been in service less than three weeks when it marched on the field at Antietam. It was in the 
reserves there, but in the pursuit succeeding that victory it was given a place in the advance, and crossed the 
river at Shepherdstown Ford, close upon the enemy s rear. Advancing too far without proper support, it was 
attacked at a disadvantage by overpowering numbers, and forced back to the river, where, in addition to its pre 
vious loss, it had to recross the ford under a severe fire. Its casualties in this affair were 63 killed, 101 wounded, 
and 105 missing or prisoners, out of the 800, or thereabouts, who were engaged. Five officers were killed, and 
Colonel Prevost was wounded while waving the colors to encourage his men. This regiment was raised under 
the auspices of the Philadelphia Corn Exchange, which furnished the necessary aid and means ; in addition, it 
paid a bounty of ten dollars to each recruit. The One Hundred and Eighteenth was under a heavy fire at 
Fredericksburg, then in Barnes s Brigade, its losses there amounting to 5 killed, 56 wounded, and 37 missing. 
At Gettysburg, the division was commanded by General Barnes, and the brigade by Colonel Tilton of the 
Twenty-second Mass. During the campaigns of 1864-65 it was in Bartlett s (3d) Brigade, Griffin s (ist) 
Division, and during that time was engaged in all the battles of the Fifth Corps. It was mustered out June ist, 
1865, having received upon its return a flattering reception from the Corn Exchange. 



294 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEENTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
RUSSELL S BRIGADE WRIGHT S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. PETER C. ELLMAKER. 



(2) COL. GIDEON CLARK ; BVT. BBIG.-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PBISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total 


Field and Staff 


2 

3 

i 




i 



i 
i 




ii 

12 

15 

12 

12 
10 

M 

20 

12 

M 


2 
II 

15 

15 

13 
12 

IO 

15 
2O 

3 

15 





I 









* 

6 
6 

4 

5 

12 

6 

9 
13 
4 
6 




6 
6 

4 
6 

12 

6 

9 
13 

4 
6 


15 

"5 

121 

*35 
117 

124 

122 

118 

US 
114 

I2O 




B 


c. 


D 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H 


I , 


K 


Totals 


9 


132 


141 


I 


7 1 


72 


1,216 





141 killed = 11.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 519; died in Confederate prisons (previously included). 21. 



BATTLES. K. &M. W 

Fredericksburg, Va., April 29, 1863 i 

Salem Church, Va 24 

Banks s Ford, Va , May 6, 1863 i 

Rappahannock Station, Va, 17 

Brandy Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 1 8 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Spotsylvania, Va 56 

Hanover, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 4 

Opequon, Va 7 

Petersburg, Va 8 

Sailor s Creek, Va 3 



Present, also, at First Fredericksburg ; Marye s Heights ; Gettysburg; Mine Run; Weldon Railroad; Fort 
Stevens ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Recruited at Philadelphia in August, 1862. It arrived at Washington, September ist, and after a 
month s stay proceeded to Harper s Ferry where it joined the Army of the Potomac. It was there assigned to 
General Calvin E. Pratt s Brigade of Howe s Division. The regiment was under fire at the first battle of Fred 
ericksburg, 1862, but was not actively engaged. In the second battle May 3, 1863 it took part in the 
engagement at Salem Church, where it sustained a loss of 10 killed, 74 wounded, and 38 missing, a total of 122 
out of 432 present for duty. It was at that time in Russell s Brigade, Brooks s Division. In the affair at Rappa 
hannock Station the brigade made a successful bayonet charge, capturing the works, together with a large number 
of prisoners, flags, and cannon. The loss in the One Hundred and Nineteenth was 7 killed, 37 wounded, and i 
missing ; Colonel Ellmaker led the brigade, General Russell being in command of the division. The regiment 
was hotly engaged at Spotsylvania, being one of the picked regiments in Upton S storming party on May loth; 
on the 1 2th it participated in the bloody contest at the "Angle " where Major Truefit and Captain Warner, the 
regimental commandants were killed. The loss at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania May 5th to i2th was 
231 killed and wounded, out of about 400 effectives that crossed the Rapidan. It also suffered a heavy percentage 
of loss in the Shenandoah Valley, its previous casualties having left but few in line. Early in the spring of 1863, 
the regiment was transferred to the Third Brigade, First Division, in which command it remained without further 
change. This division was commanded, successively, by Generals Brooks, Wright, Russell, and Wheaton ; the 
brigade by Generals Russell, Eustis, and Edwards. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
ROWLEY S BRIGADE DOUBLEDAY S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1i COL. CHAPMAN BIDDLE. 



(2) COL. ALEXANDER DIDDLE. 



(3) COL. JAMES 8. WAKNEH. 



COMPANIES 


KILLED AND DIED or WOODS. 


DIED or DISEASE, ACCIDENTS. IN I UISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 



1 




I 




I 


l 
2O 

9 

9 
10 

IO 

16 

7 
6 

IO 

6 


2 
21 

9 
IO 

IO 

10 

16 

8 
6 

10 

7 


I 




I 










I 
IO 

4 
6 

3 

7 
8 

2 

5 
9 
9 


2 
10 

4 
7 
3 

7 
8 

2 

5 
9 
9 


7 
05 

77 
90 

86 

95 

96 

75 

58 
100 

92 




B . 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


104 


109 


2 


64 


66 


891 





109 killed = 12.2 per cent. 
Total killed and wounded, 402 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 18. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Fredericksburg, Va 45 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 29 

Wilderness, Va 4 

Spotsylvania, Va 9 

North Anna, Va 2 



BATTLES. K.JfcM.W. 

Bethesda Church, Va 2 

Petersburg, Va 6 

Dabney s Mills, Va 8 

Five Forks, Va 2 

Salisbury Prison, N. C i 



Present, also, at Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor ; Weldon Railroad ; Peeble s Farm ; Boydton Road ; 
Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. This gallant little regiment sustained a heavy loss in proportion to its numbers. At no time did it 
have a full complement of men, yet it distinguished itself on all occasions by its efficiency. It was recruited 
mostly in Philadelphia, and was organized there in September, 1862. It joined McClellan s Army in October, 
and was placed in McCandless s Brigade, Meade s Division, Pennsylvania Reserves. With this command it fought 
in its initiatory battle at Fredericksburg, with a loss of 14 killed, 1 14 wounded, and 10 missing ; total, 138. The 
brigade, under Colonel Chapman Biddle, was engaged at Gettysburg in the battle of the first day, its operations 
being conspicuous in the history of that day. The regiment marched on that field with only 263 officers and 
men; of this number, 12 were killed, 106 wounded, and 61 missing or captured; many of the prisoners were 
wounded before they were captured. Upon the transfer of the First to the Fifth Corps, the regiment was placed 
in Roy Stone s Brigade, of Wadsworth s Division. It had received no recruits, and entered the spring campaign 
of 1864 with only 200 men. It fought in all the battles of the Fifth Corps, and in October the morning report 
showed only 89 men present for duty. In the spring of 1865 it entered on the final campaign in Coulter s (3d) 
Brigade, Crawford s (3d) Division, Fifth Corps, in which command it fought at Five Forks, and was present at 
the last surrender. 



296 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-NINTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
WHEATON S BRIGADE GETTY S DIVISION SIXTH CORPS. 



COLONEL FKEDERICK H. COLLIEK ; BVT. BKIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


2 
2 
I 



2 
I 
I 



I 

* 




23 

16 
M 

13 

ii 

16 

10 
12 
IO 
IO 


2 

25 
17 
M 

IS 

12 

17 
10 

12 
II 
10 


2 
I 



I 

* 


I 


t 





ii 

18 

7 
7 
3 

5 
6 

M 

7 
8 


2 
12 

18 
8 

7 

3 
6 

6 
M 

7 
8 


16 
130 
126 
116 

97 

9i 
104 

100 

101 

103 

86 






B 


c 


D 


E 


F . 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


IO 


135 


MS 


5 


86 


9 1 


1,070 





145 killed = 13.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 531. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va. (1862) i 

Fredericksburg, Va. ( 1 863) 17 

Gettysburg, Pa 4 

Brandy Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 45 

Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864 2 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 9, 1864 2 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12,1 864 24 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 i 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 6 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864 6 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 9, 1864 i 

Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864 7 

Petersburg, Va., June 19, 1864 i 

Petersburg, Va., June 23, 1864 i 

Fort Stevens, D. C 4 

Opequon, Va 6 

Flint s Hill, Va., Sept. 2 1, 1864 3 

Cedar Creek, Va 6 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1864 4 

Fall of Petersburg, Va 2 

Nov. 1864, Place unknown i 



Present, also, at Antietam ; Rappahannock Station ; Fisher s Hill ; Sailor s Creek ; Appomattox. 



NOTES. Recruited principally in Pittsburg and its vicinity. It left the State September 2, 1862, and went 
to Washington. It joined the army just before the battle of Antietam, and was, soon after, assigned to Rowley s 
(3d) Brigade, Newton s (3d) Division, Sixth Corps. It was under fire with slight loss at Fredericksburg, but in 
the second battle on that field 1863 it was hotly engaged at Salem Church, where it lost ii killed, 54 
wounded, and ii missing. The regiment entered upon the campaign of 1864, in Getty s Division, and at the 
Wilderness encountered its hardest fighting; it lost there 190 in killed and wounded, besides several who were 
missing ; Major Snyder fell from his horse, killed while cheering his men. At Cold Harbor the One Hundred and 
Thirty-ninth took part in the storming of the works, where Lieutenant- Colonel Moody and two line officers were 
killed. In the final and victorious assault on the works at Petersburg, the regiment took a prominent part, and the 
Color-Sergeant, David W. Young, was one of three color-bearers in the army one in each corps who received 
a congratulatory letter from General Grant, complimenting them as being the " three soldiers most conspicuous 
for gallantry in the final assault." Each letter was accompanied by a large sum of money which had been raised 
for that purpose by patriotic citizens. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTIETH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 



ZOOK S BRIGADE CALDWELL S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COLONEL RICHARD P. ROBERTS (Killed). 



(2) COLON EL JOHN FRASKR; BVT. 



Co* PA NIK*. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, Ac- 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 
I 



2 



I 

I 

3 
i 





I 

18 

5 

2 5 
24 

12 

2 3 
19 
2 5 
13 
13 


2 
J 9 

15 

27 

24 

13 
24 
22 

26 

13 
13 






I 












11 

24 

8 

12 

18 
6 

12 

9 
U 
J 3 




l I 
24 
9 

I 2 

18 
6 

12 

9 
14 
J 3 


13 
114 
126 

112 
1 08 
IOI 

116 
103 
129 
109 

IOI 


Company *\ 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


10 


188 


198 


I 


127 


128 


1,132 





198 killed 17.4 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 732 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 28. 



BATTLES. K.A M.\V. 

Chancellorsville, Va 15 

Gettysburg, Pa 6 1 

Mine Run, Va i 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 

Corbin s Bridge, Va 4 

Po River, Va 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 52 

North Anna, Va 3 

Present, also, at Strawberry Plains ; Appomattox. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va i o 

Cold Harbor, Va 8 

Petersburg, Va 14 

Deep Bottom, Va 5 

Ream s Station, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va 4 

Sailor s Creek, Va i 

Farmville, Va 5 



NOTES. The One Hundred and Fortieth sustained the greatest percentage of loss in action of any regiment 
from Pennsylvania. It was recruited in the western counties, and left the State September 10, 1862. It was 
stationed awhile in Maryland, and during the following winter it occupied quarters at Falmouth, Va., having been 
assigned to Zook s (3d) Brigade, Hancock s (ist) Division. On April 28, 1863, it broke camp to march to 
Chancellorsville. In that, its first battle, it lost 7 killed, 28 wounded, and 9 missing. General Caldwell, who 
succeeded Hancock, commanded the division at Gettysburg. Arriving on that field, the division moved into the 
" whirling vortex " of death in the wheat-field where it stubbornly contested the Confederate advance until half 
the division lay dead or wounded on the field. General Zook was killed ; Colonel Roberts, who succeeded him 
in command of the brigade, also fell dead. The loss of the regiment was 37 killed, 144 wounded, and 60 miss 
ing ; a total of 241 out of the 589 who were engaged. Desperate as the fighting had been at Gettysburg, the 
regiment encountered at Spotsylvania an equally heavy loss, and with less men in line. It was engaged in Han 
cock s grand charge on May 1 2th, and in all the other actions of the Second Corps about Spotsylvania, its losses 
there amounting to 34 killed, 126 wounded, and 9 missing. General Miles commanded the division at Farm 
ville, where the Second Corps and the One Hundred and Fortieth fought their last battle. In this final engage 
ment the regiment met with a severe loss ; two officers were among the killed, falling with the goal of a safe 
return full in sight. 



298 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
GRAHAM S BRIGADE BIRNEY S DIVISION THIRD CORPS. 



COLONEL HENKY J. MADILL ; BVT. MAJOK-GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 
I 



I 





I 
I 


* 


I 
12 

J 5 
15 
13 

12 
2O 

19 

I I 

*9 

24 


3 

J 3 

1 5 
16 

13 

12 
20 
2O 
12 

J 9 

24 


2 










I 




8 
3 

10 
10 

14 
6 

2 

7 

5 
ii 


2 
8 

3 

10 
10 

M 
6 

2 

7 
5 

12 


16 
116 

IOI 

98 

IOO 

95 
97 

IOI 
112 
IOO 
IOI 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F . 


G . 


H 


I . 


K 




6 


161 


167 


3 


76 


79 


*,37 





167 killed = 16. i per cent. 
Total of killed and died of wounds, 616. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Fredericksburg, Va 2 

Chancellorsville, Va 62 

Gettysburg, Pa 49 

Auburn Va 4 

Mine Run, Va . . 4 

Wilderness, Va 16 

Spotsylvania, Va 9 

North Anna, Va 3 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

Petersburg Assault 5 

Jerusalem Road, Va i 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Poplar Spring Church, Oct. 2, 1864 2 

Boydton Road, Va 3 

Hatcher s Run, Va i 

Petersburg, Va., March 25 i 



Present, also, at Kelly s Ford ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor ; Strawberry Plains ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; 
Appomattox. 



NOTES. Seven companies were recruited in Bradford County, two in Susquehanna, and one in Wayne. It 
left Harrisburg, August 30, 1862, and active service commenced at once. It was assigned to Robinson s (ist) 
Brigade, Birney s (ist) Division, Third Corps, in which it fought at Fredericksburg, where it was engaged mostly 
as a battery support. At Chancellorsville it charged the advancing lines of the enemy, holding them in check 
until nearly surrounded, when it retired slowly and in good order; its losses were 23 killed, 152 wounded, and 
60 missing; total, 235 out of 419 in action. Its ranks were so reduced by death, wounds and sickness, that only 
198 answered to the morning roll-call as it stood in line, ready to enter the batde of Gettysburg. It fought 
there in the Peach Orchard, losing 25 killed, 103 wounded, and 21 missing, a terrible percentage; Major Israel 
P. Spaulding was mortally wounded in that battle. In 1864, the One Hundred and Forty-first, with its division, 
was transferred to the Second Corps, General Birney retaining command of the division. Though small in num 
bers, the regiment took a gallant part in all the subsequent battles of the Second Corps, its losses being severe 
in proportion to its strength. Lieutenant-Colonel Guy H. Watkins, an intrepid and skillful officer, was killed 
while leading his men in the assault at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. 



TmtEE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY- SECOND PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 

ROWI.KY S r>Ki;\i>K - DOUBLEDAY S DIVISION -- FIRST CORPS. 

(1) Cou ROBERT P. CUMMINS (Killed). (8) COL. ALFRED B. Mct ALMONT; BVT. Buio.-GiN. 

(3) COL. HORATIO N. WARREN. 



CUMI-AME8. 


KILLED AND DIKD or WIU-MW. 


DIKD or DIMEAMK, ACCIDENTM, IN I UISON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


2 



I 




I 



2 



i 


I 
IO 

!9 

1 1 

3 

i? 

10 

22 

J 3 
15 
17 


3 
10 

20 
I I 

3 

18 

10 

22 

15 
15 

18 





* 










8 

3 
9 

9 

8 

7 
9 
7 
6 

6 




8 

3 
9 

9 
8 

7 
9 
7 
6 

6 


15 

86 

97 

88 

84 
92 

97 
94 
89 

IOI 

92 




B 


C , 


D . 


E 


F . 


G . 


H . 


T 


K 


Totals 


7 


148 


55 





7 2 


72 


935 





155 killed 16.5 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 566 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 20. 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Fredericksburg, Va 66 

Picket, Va., Feb. 21, 1863 i 

Gettysburg, Pa 49 

Catlett s Station, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 12 

Spotsylvania, Va 9 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

North Anna, Va 4 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Petersburg, Va 3 

Boydton Road, Va 2 

Dabney s Mills, Va 5 

Five Forks, Va 2 



Present, also, at Fitz Hugh s Crossing ; Chancellorsville Mine Run Totopotomoy ; Weldon Railroad ; 
Peeble s Farm ; Hatcher s Run ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. It took the field in September, 1862, and was attached soon after to the Second Brigade, Meade s 
Division, Pennsylvania Reserves, First Corps. It marched with them to Fredericksburg, taking part in their 
gallant but unsuccessful battle on that field; it went into action 550 strong, losing 16 killed, 182 wounded, and 
45 missing ; many of the latter are missing yet, all of them having been left on the field, dead or badly wounded ; 
Major John Bradley was mortally wonnded in that action. The Reserves were withdrawn from the field in Feb 
ruary, 1863, on account of their severe losses, whereupon the One Hundred and Forty-second was assigned to 
Rowley s (ist) Brigade, Doubleday s (3d) Division. At Gettysburg, the First Corps opened the battle and did 
some of the best fighting on that famous field. The One Hundred and Forty-second held a position in the front 
line and on the left, where it received a hot fire ; its loss was 13 killed, 128 wounded, and 70 missing ; total, 211, 
nearly all of whom fell in the first day s battle, Colonel Cummins being among the killed. In April, 1864, 
Colonel McCalmont, an officer of superior merit, was detailed on special duty ; he subsequently became Colonel 
of the Two Hundred and Eighth, and was placed in command of a brigade. He was succeeded by Major 
Warren, who led the regiment in all the subsequent battles of the Fifth Corps, to which it was transferred in April, 
1864. On joining the Fifth Corps, it was assigned to Stone s (3d) Brigade, of Wadsworth s (4th) Division, a division 
composed entirely of First Corps veterans. The regiment served also in Chamberlain s (ist) Brigade of Griffin s 
(ist) Division, and again in Crawford s (3d) Division, Fifth Corps. 



300 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FOETY- THIRD PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
STONE S BRIGADE DOUBLEDAY S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



COLONEL EDMUND L. DANA ; BVT. BBIG.-GEN. 



COMPANIB 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PKISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 


I 

I 



I 
I 
I 



I 
I 

I 






13 
13 
14 
12 

22 

19 
12 

9 
II 

18 


I 
M 

J 3 
J 5 
13 

2 3 
J 9 

J 3 
10 

12 

18 


I 










I 






6 

24 

9 

10 

*5 

24 

20 
19 

18 

5 


I 
6 
24 

9 
10 

i5 

24 

20 

J 9 
*9 

5 


16 

*43 
181 

J3 1 

S 2 

J 57 
130 

J5 1 

M3 

141 

146 


Company A 


B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


8 


M3 


J 5 J 


2 


*5 


152 


1,491 





151 killed=io.i per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 558 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 49. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Gettysburg, Pa 42 

Wilderness, Va 57 

Laurel Hill, Va., May 9 4 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 10 12 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8-1 8 4 



BATTLES. K. & M.W. 

North Anna, Va 7 

Cold Harbor, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va 12 

Weldon Railroad, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va., Feb. 5, 1865 9 



Present, also, at Chancellorsville ; Totopotomoy ; Bethesda Church ; Boydton Road. 



NOTES. Recruited principally in Luzerne County, in October, 1862. It arrived at Washington in November, 
where it remained on light duty until February, 1863 ; it was then ordered to the front and assigned to Colonel 
Roy Stone s Brigade, Doubleday s Division, First Corps. Although present at Chancellorsville, it did its first fight 
ing at Gettysburg. There it encountered hot work in the battle of the first day, where, out of 465 present, it lost 
13 killed, 128 wounded, and 70 missing; many of the latter, as afterward ascertained, were killed. When the 
brigade was ordered to retire the color-sergeant refused to leave until it was too late, and fell dead while defi 
antly waving his colors in the face of the advancing enemy ; the flag, however, was not lost, but was carried 
safely from the field. In September, 363 recruits were received, which brought its effective strength up to 500 
muskets or more. On May 3d, 1864,11 started on the Wilderness campaign, then in Wadsworth s (4th) Division 
(afterwards Cutler s), Fifth Corps, with Colonel Roy Stone still in command of the brigade. At the Wilderness, 
Lieutenant-Colonel John D. Musser was killed, and the regiment lost 23 killed, 136 wounded, and 61 captured or 
missing; two days later it was engaged at Spotsylvania, where its losses aggregated 16 killed, 54 wounded, and 
3 missing. The regiment fought its last battle at Hatcher s Run Dabney s Mills and in February, 1865, 
was ordered on guard duty at Hart s Island, in New York harbor, where it remained until June 12, 1865, when 
it was mustered out While in the Fifth Corps the regiment served, also, in Griffin s (ist) Division, and in 
Crawford s (y\) Division, and the brigade was commanded successively by General Edward S. Bragg, General 
Joshua L. Chamberlain, Colonel J. W. Hoffman, and other distinguished officers. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING KEGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BROOKE S BRIGADE -- HANCOCK S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. HIRAM L. BROWN ; BVT. BRIO.-GEN. 



(2) COL. DAVID B. McCREAKY : BVT. BRIO.-GEN. 



COM PAN I EH. 


KILLED AND DIED OF Worxus. 


DIED OP DIHKASE, A<X-IDENTS, IN Pmsox, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 


I 

2 

* 

. 

3 
3 



2 
I 

3 
3 




16 
1 1 

3 
3 

2^ 

18 

22 
21 

18 
1 1 


I 

18 

II 

3 
33 
3 
18 

24 

22 
21 
14 





1 
1 





I 








20 

23 
2O 

7 

22 

3 
34 
16 

5 
16 


* 

2O 

24 
21 

!? 
22 

3 1 

35 
16 

5 
16 


15 
181 

138 
140 

5 1 

144 

"5 
65 
140 

121 

146 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


18 


187 


205 


3 


214 


217 


MS 6 





205 killed 14.1 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 651 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), q8. 



BATTLES. K. & M. W 

Fredericksburg, Va 91 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 27 

Auburn, Va } 2 

Bristoe Station, Va. ) 5 

Spotsylvania, Va 40 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va 14 

Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 9 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 4 

Deep Bottom, Va 3 

Hatcher s Run, Va i 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 2 

Sutherland Station, Va 2 



Present, also, at Antietam ; Mine Run ; Wilderness ; ?o River ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Ream s 
Station ; White Oak Road ; Sailor s Creek ; Farmville ; Appomattox. 

NOTES. Six companies were recruited in Erie County ; the others, in Western Pennsylvania. Colonel Brown 
had already served with distinction in the Eighty-third Pennsylvania. The regiment left the State September 1 2th, 
arriving five days later on the field at Antietam. While at Harper s Ferry it was assigned to Caldwell s (ist) 
Brigade, Hancock s (ist) Division, Second Corps. At Fredericksburg it took eight companies into action, two 
companies having been detailed on the skirmish line. The eight companies lost 34 killed, 152 wounded, and 43 
missing; a total of 229 out of 505 in action; the missing ones were wounded or killed. Nine of the line 
officers lost their lives in this bloody assault, and Colonel Brown received a serious wound. At Chancellorsville, 
Major John W. Patton was mortally wounded, and 1 12 of the men were captured at an outpost, having been left 
behind by the retreating army. The regiment fought at Gettysburg in the Fourth Brigade (Brooke s), taking 
part in the famous contest in the wheat field, where, with about 200 men in line, its casualties amounted to 10 
killed, 66 wounded, and 8 missing. During the winter of 1863-4 the One Hundred and Forty-fifth occupied a 
camp, well-built, which combined a neat, tasteful appearance with substantial warmth and comfort. Fresh 
recruits were received and drilled, and it took the field in May, 1864, in efficient condition. A large number of 
the men were captured at Petersburg in June, 1864, which with previous losses left but few in line at the subse 
quent actions in which the Division was engaged. Its casualties at Spotsylvania were 23 killed, 103 wounded, 
and 46 captured or missing. 



302 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BROOKE S BRIGADE BARLOW S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



COLONEL JAMES A. BEAVER; BVT. BRIG. GEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 



7 





2 
I 
I 




15 
14 
28 
2 9 
M 
I? 

J 9 

24 

!9 

*9 




16 
i4 

35 
29 

14 
i7 

*9 
26 

20 
20 


I 
I 




2 











J 9 

3 
ii 

18 

25 
13 

10 

18 
19 

20 


I 

2O 

3 
ii 

20 
25 

J 3 
10 

18 
J 9 

20 


14 
141 
I 3 

133 
148 
122 
121 
117 
141 
132 

135 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


12 


198 


2IO 


4 


I8 3 


I8 7 


i339 





210 killed = 15.6 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 769; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 62. 



ATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Chancellorsville, Va 48 

Gettysburg, Pa 31 

Wilderness, Va i 

Po River, Va., May 10 37 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 29 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 16 i 

Totopotomoy, Va 2 

Cold Harbor, Va 14 



BATTLES. K. & M. W. 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 5 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 1 1 

Jerusalem Road, Va 5 

Deep Bottom, Va 8 

Ream s Station, Va 6 

Hatcher s Run, Va 2 

White Oak Road, Va 7 

Farmville, Va 2 



Prison guard, Salisbury, N. C i 

Present, also, at Bristoe Station ; Mine Run ; North Anna ; Strawberry Plains ; Sutherland Station ; Appo- 
mattox. 

NOTES. Organized at Harrisburg, in September, 1862, seven of the companies having been recruited in 
Centre County. At the request of the line officers, James A. Beaver, Lieutenant-Colonel of the Forty-fifth 
Pennsylvania, was appointed Colonel. After three months of service in Maryland, it joined the Army of the 
Potomac, and was assigned to Caldwell s (ist) Brigade, Hancock s (ist) Division, Second Corps; it remained in 
this division (First) during its entire service. Its first battle occurred at Chancellorsville, where it lost 31 killed, 
1 19 wounded, and 14 missing, Colonel Beaver being among the severely wounded. General Caldwell com 
manded the division at Gettysburg, and Colonel Cross (Fifth New Hampshire), the brigade; the loss of the 
regiment was 19 killed, 101 wounded, and 5 missing. It went into winter quarters (1863-4) near Stevensburg, 
Va., receiving in the meanwhile 283 conscripts and 120 recruits, a needed accession. It was prominently 
engaged at Po River and Spotsylvania, where it lost 33 killed, 235 wounded, and 33 missing; total, 301, 
the greatest loss of any infantry regiment at Spotsylvania. Colonel Beaver, while in command of a brigade, 
was severely wounded at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. He rejoined his regiment just as it was entering the fight at 
Ream s Station, where he was again wounded, and suffered amputation of a leg. In September, 1864, the War 
Department ordered that one regiment in each division be armed with breech-loading rifles ; the One Hundred 
and Forty-eighth was selected by General Hancock as the deserving one in its division to be thus armed. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



303 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-NINTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
STONE S BRIGADE DOUBLED AY S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. ROY STONE ; BVT. Buio.-Gu. 



(2) COL. WALTON DWIGHT. 



(3) COL. JOHN IKWIN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OP WOUNDS. 


DIED of DISEASE, ACCIDENT*, IN PKISON. tc. 


Total 
Knrollmetit. 


officers. 


Men 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 




I 
I 







I 

I 






16 
20 

16 
18 

3 
16 

ii 

*7 
20 

13 




7 
21 

16 

18 

13 
16 

ii 
18 

21 
13 


. 

. 
. 
. 
. 
. 

. 

. 




IO 

16 

14 
16 

21 

1? 
24 

18 
16 

20 




IO 

16 

14 
16 

21 

17 
24 

18 
16 

20 


7 

"34 
146 
136 

125 

35 
144 

1 S 1 
144 

59 
163 


( ^ornn.inv A 


B . 


C . 


D . 


E 


F 


G. 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


4 


1 60 


164 


. 


172 


172 


i,454 





164 killed 1 1. 2 per cent. 

Total killed and wounded, 613 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 60 ; 
included with the killed, 22. 



missing in action 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Chancellorsville, Va i 

Gettysburg, Pa 66 

Wilderness, Va 42 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8 10 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 9, 1864 i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864 5 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 1 1, 1864 i 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864 3 

North Anna, Va 9 

Present, also, at Totopotomoy ; Hatcher s Run. 



BATTLES. K.AM.W 

Bethesda Church, Va 4 

Cold Harbor, Va i 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 6 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 3 

Weldon Railroad, Va 

Weldon Railroad, Va., Dec. 8, 1864 i 

Peeble s Farm, Va i 

Dabney s Mills, Va 2 



NOTES. The One Hundred and Forty-ninth and its companion regiment, the One Hundred and Fiftieth of 
the same brigade, were also known as "Bucktail " regiments, each man wearing a bucktail in his cap in imitation 
of the famous regiment in the Pennsylvania Reserves. The men were recruited in August, 1862, from the forests 
and mountain districts of the State, and proved worthy of their adopted name. Roy Stone, Major of the original 
Bucktails, and an officer of more than ordinary ability, was appointed Colonel. He was, soon after, given a 
brigade of Pennsylvania troops which included the two new Bucktail regiments. The brigade was only slightly 
engaged at Chancellorsville, but at Gettysburg it took a meritorious part in the battle of the first day. It was 
then in Doubleday s (3d) Division, First Corps ; its casualties on that field were 66 killed and mortally wounded, 
159 wounded, and in captured or missing; total, 336. Colonel Stone being in command of the brigade at 
Gettysburg, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton Dwight led the regiment ; both fell severely wounded. In 1864, Stone s 
brigade formed a part of Wadsworth s Division, Fifth Corps. In the battle of the Wilderness May 5, 1864, the 
regiment lost ii killed, 109 wounded, and 95 captured or missing; and at Spotsylvania, 12 killed, 84 wounded, 
and 3 missing ; many of the missing never returned. In February, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Elmira, 
where it remained on duty at the prison camp until the close of the war. 



304 



REGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
STONE S BRIGADE DOUBLED AY S DIVISION FIRST CORPS. 



(1) COL. LANGHORNE WISTER; BVT. BRIO. GEN 



(2) COL. HENRY S. HUIDEKOPER. 



(3) COL. GEORGE W. JONES. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OF DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PRISON, &c. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff. . 





2 



I 




I 






. . 
13 

5 

9 
ii 
ii 

13 
16 
16 

M 

* 




13 

7 
9 

12 
II 

13 
I? 

16 
i4 

t 




I 


* 


* 







8 
1 1 

14 
6 

9 
4 
ii 

12 
12 

7 




8 

12 
14 

6 

9 
4 
ii 

12 
12 

7 


16 

95 
8? 

122 

94 

95 
88 

90 

JI 3 
95 
"3 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E . 


F . 


G . 


H. 


T , 


K. 


Totals 


4 


1 08 


112 


I 


94 


95 


i, 008 





112 killed = 12.5 per cent.* 
Total of killed and wounded, 431 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 38. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



BATTLES. 



K. & M.W. 



Gettysburg, Pa 57 

Wilderness, Va., May 5 14 

Wilderness, Va., May 6 8 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 8 5 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 10 6 

Spotsylvania, Va., May 12 4 



North Anna, Va 2 

Bethesda Church, Va i 

Petersburg, Va 8 

Weldon Railroad, Va i 

Hatcher s Run, Va i 

Dabney s Mills, Va 5 



Present, also, at Fitz Hugh s Crossing ; Chancellorsville ; Totopotomoy ; Cold Harbor. 



NOTES. Organized in September, 1862, as one of the regiments for Roy Stone s Bucktail Brigade. Lang- 
horne Wister, an officer in the old Bucktails, was appointed Colonel. Upon its arrival at Washington the regi 
ment was ordered on guard duty in and about the city. Company K was stationed at the Soldier s Home, Mr. 
Lincoln s summer residence, where it remained on duty as a body-guard to the President during its entire term 
of service, the One Hundred and Fiftieth, consequently, taking only nine companies to the field ; its percentage 
of killed was far above the average, although the number killed was not numerically large. At Gettysburg the 
regiment took 417 officers and men into action, losing 29 killed, 151 wounded, and 84 missing; total, 264. 
Both Wister and Huidekoper were severely wounded in that battle, the latter losing an arm ; the regiment was 
in Stone s Brigade of Doubleday s Division, and fought on the Chambersburg Pike in the first day s battle ; it 
was ably handled by its field officers, and rendered good service. Stone s Brigade was transferred in 1864 to the 
Fifth Corps, and placed in Wadsworth s (4th) Division. In June it was transferred to Griffin s (ist) Division. 
Col. Stone was disabled in the battle of the Wilderness, and was succeeded in his command of the brigade by 
General Bragg of Wisconsin, an able and gallant officer of the famous Iron Brigade. The One Hundred and 
Fiftieth fought its last battle on February 5, 1865, at Dabney s Mills. It was then ordered to Elmira, in company 
with the One Hundred and Forty-ninth, where it performed guard duty at the prison camp until mustered out. 

*Not including Company K, which was on detached duty during the entire service. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIFTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 

AYKES S BRIGADE -- GRIFFIN S DIVISION- 1 n in ( OKI S. 



(l)CoL. EDWAKU J. ALLEN. 



(8) COL. JOHN II. CAIN. 



(8) COL. ALFKEU L. PEAKSON; BVT. MAJOK-OEN. 



COMPANIES 


KILLED AND DIED or WOUNDH. 


DIED of DISEASE, ACCIDENTS, IN PIUHON, Ac. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men 


Total. 


officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 






2 




I 


* 

2 






8 

3 
1 1 

8 
16 

J 3 

5 

16 

2 5 

12 




8 

13 

3 

8 
16 
M 

15 
16 

27 

12 








l 









7 
1 1 

9 
6 

12 
I I 

5 

7 
6 

7 




7 
1 1 

9 
6 

J3 

1 1 

5 

17 
6 

i? 


17 
57 
<56 
MS 

137 
148 

158 
164 

142 

55 
144 




B 


C . 


D 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


5 


137 


142 


I 


ii i 


I 12 


i.5 a 3 





Total of killed and wounded, 519 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), lo. 



BATTLES. K. & M.W 

Fredericksburg, Va 21 

Chancellorsville, Va 3 

Gettysburg, Pa 7 

Wilderness, Va 14 

Spotsylvania, Va 18 

North Anna, Va 3 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 2 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 26 



BATTLES. K.&M.W. 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 6 

Peeble s Farm, Va 8 

Boydton Road, Va 4 

Dabney s Mills, Va 9 

Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1 865 3 

Quaker Road, Va 3 

White Oak Road, Va 4 

Five Forks, Va 9 

Appomattox, Va i 



Present, also, at Antietam ; Shepherdstown ; Rappahannock Station : Mine Run ; Bethesda Church ; Weldon 
Railroad. 

NOTES. Recruited at Pittsburg and vicinity in August, 1862, in response to the President s second call for 
troops. It arrived at Washington in September, and was assigned to Allabach s (2(1) Brigade, Humphreys s (3d) 
Division, Fifth Corps. It was engaged in Humphreys s bloody assault on Marye s Heights, where it lost 6 killed, 
58 wounded, and 4 missing ; the other regiments of the brigade suffered an unusually severe loss. Upon the 
muster-out of the other regiments in the brigade (nine months men), which occurred soon after Chancellorsville, 
the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth was placed in Weed s (3d) Brigade, Ayres s (2d) Division. General Weed was 
killed at Gettysburg, on Little Round Top, while seizing that position with his brigade. In 1864, the regiment 
was in Ayres s (ist) Brigade, Griffin s (ist) Division. It was known as the Regular Brigade, as the Regulars 
were at that time massed in this one brigade. The regiment took a prominent part in all the battles of the 
Fifth Corps in 1864-5, and distinguished itself particularly at the assault on Petersburg, at Peeble s Farm, and at 
the Quaker Road. Colonel Pearson, who was in command of the brigade part of the time, was twice brevetted 
for gallantry, while the regiment received complimentary notice from headquarters. In the final campaign the 
One Hundred and Fifty-fifth was in Bartlett s (3(1) Brigade of the same division. It was in line at Appomattox, 
and was pressing the enemy when the token of surrender was displayed. 
20 



KEGIMENTAL LOSSES IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY. 
BURNHAM S BRIGADE BROOKS S DIVISION EIGHTEENTH CORPS. 



(1) COL. GEORGE K. BOWEN. 

(2) COL. JOHN G. GREGG. 



(3) COL. JAMES C. BRISCOE ; BVT. BRIG.-GEN. 

(4) COL. SAMUEL I. GIVEN. 



COMPANIES. 


KILLED AND DIED OF WOUNDS. 


DIED OP DISEASE, ACCIDENTS. IN PRISON, <fcc. 


Total 
Enrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field and Staff 





I 

3 
i 

2 

I 
T 
I 






2O 
IO 
IO 

13 
13 

5 
5 

22 
IO 

6 


20 
I I 

*3 

J 3 

14 

7 
6 

23 
1 1 

6 







I 



t 

I 

* 





4 
6 

7 
7 
7 
6 

9 

8 

5 

7 




4 
6 

7 
8 

7 
6 

9 
9 

5 
7 


J 3 
126 

122 
112 

T 34 

T 33 
1 20 

I0 5 
117 

106 
"3 




B . 


C . 


D. 


E 


F 


G . 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


IO 


114 


124 


2 


66 


68 


I,2OI 





124 killed = 10.3 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 456. 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Proctor s Creek, Va., May n 2 

Proctor s Creek, Va. , May 13 i 

Fort Darling, Va., May 14 2 

Fort Darling, Va., May 15 i 

Drewry s Bluff, Va., May 16 25 

Cold Harbor, Va., June i 13 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 2 6 



BATTLES. K. &M.W. 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3 33 

Cold Harbor Trenches, Va 3 

Petersburg, Va. (assault) 3 

Petersburg Mine, Va 2 

Petersburg Trenches, Va 1 6 

Fort Harrison, Va., Sept. 29 14 

Chaffin s Farm, Va., Sept. 30 3 



Present, also, at Fair Oaks (1864) ; Fall of Richmond. 



NOTES. The One Hundred and Eighty-eighth was organized in April, 1864, from the surplus members of 
the Third Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery. It took the field immediately with about 900 men, a large proportion of 
whom were veterans who had served in other regiments. After the war had ended, its enrollment was increased 
by an accession of men from the One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania, which had been mustered out, 
and its recruits turned over to the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth. The losses in action of the One Hundred 
and Eighty-eighth fell entirely on its original members, its actual percentage of killed being consequently much 
larger than indicated above. The regiment left Fort Monroe, where it was organized, the Third Artillery 
being there on garrison duty, and joined the Army of the James at Yorktown in April, 1864, just prior to its 
departure for Bermuda Hundred. Fighting commenced immediately on its arrival there, and at Drewry s 
Bluff, a battle fought in a dense fog, the regiment was engaged in a severe contest. Two weeks later, the 
Eighteenth Corps was moved by transports to White House Landing on the York, from whence it marched to 
Cold Harbor, where it participated in the ill-advised and disastrous assaults at that place, losing 19 killed, 144 
wounded, and 8 missing ; five officers were among the killed. At Fort Harrison the regiment, then in Stan- 
nard s Division, took part in that gallant and successful assault. In December, the Corps having been discon 
tinued, it was assigned to Roberts s (3d) Brigade, Devens s (3d) Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. It was mustered 
out on December 14, 1865. 



THREE HUNDRED FIGHTING REGIMENTS. 



;u>7 



FIRST DELAWARE INFANTRY. 
CARROLL S BRIGADE --GIBBON S DIVISION SECOND CORPS. 



(1) COL. JOHN W. ANDREWS. 



(2) COL. THOMAS A. SMYTH ; BVT. MAJ.-GEN. (Klllod). 
(3) COL. DANIEL WOODALL ; BVT. BKIU.-GKN. 



COM PA MEM. 


KILLED ANI> DIED OF WOVNIM. 


DIED or DINEABE, ACCIDKNTM, IN PIUHON, &c. 


Total 
Knrollment. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Field anil Staff 


2 

2 
2 
I 
I 



I 
I 
I 
I 






20 

1? 
15 

18 
1 1 
16 

15 
1 1 

12 
I I 


2 
22 

9 
16 

*9 
1 1 

*7 
16 

12 

13 
II 




I 





I 
I 








8 
1 1 

3 
!3 

15 

*5 

12 

3 
10 

8 




9 

1 1 

13 
13 
16 
16 

12 

3 
10 

8 


16 
249 

74 
197 

196 
228 
214 
214 
206 
179 
189 




B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Totals 


12 


146 


58 


3 


118 


121 


2,062 





Of the 1,000 originally enrolled, 142 were killed -- 14.2 per cent. 
Total of killed and wounded, 578 ; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 24. 



BATTLES. K. A M.W. 

Totopotomoy, Va i 

Cold Harbor, Va 8 

Siege of Petersburg, Va 5 

Deep Bottom, Va i 

Ream s Station, Va 2 

Boydton Road, Va 2 

Hatcher s Run, Va i 

H igh Bridge, Va 5 



BATTLES. K. A M.W. 

Antietam, Md 56 

Fredericksburg, Va 22 

Chancellorsville, Va 9 

Gettysburg, Pa 13 

Bristoe Station, Va i 

Mine Run, Va i 

Wilderness, Va 20 

Spotsylvania, Va 10 

North Anna, Va i 

Present, also, at Auburn ; Morton s Ford ; Po River ; Strawberry Plains ; Farmville ; Appomattox.